Pole Barn Ideas , SUGGESTIONS PLEASE!!!

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by greywolves, Dec 29, 2012.

  1. xtnomad

    xtnomad Adventurer

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    You said POLE BARN, I had mine built by a company out of OLK. that built 342 barns in a year, it is all they do. Mine is 30x50 clear span with wooden truss. Then I had a contractor pour the concrete after the pole barn was built. This is the cheapest route to take, they built the barn $1,000.00 cheaper than I could even buy the materials for and build it my self. If you go this route plan what doors you want and where and if you want utilitys under the slab or enter the side. Good Luck.
    #21
  2. arcanum

    arcanum Been here awhile

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    I can almost guarantee you that a car lift is cheaper than putting in an oil change pit in the floor. Lots of concrete and time,concrete forms,and it is difficult to dig a smallish pit to any depth with a backhoe. I have BTDT on the pit construction.
    If you do put in a car lift, excavate deeper to pour a thicker slab where the lift columns sit. I would even add some steel reinforcing under the columns as well
    #22
  3. muddywater

    muddywater Been here awhile

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    +1
    The pits can be a death trap too. A lift is far more versatile also.
    #23
  4. greywolves

    greywolves Too OLD to be a NOOB

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    THANKS FOR THE GREAT RESPONSE!!

    WON'T build it myself because this is my ONLY shot at this. I know I COULD build a "Decent" building, BUT I think on a onetime shot like this it would be "Cost Effective" to pay some PROS to get it right the first time. You guys know how it is - when you take on just about ANY project for the first time - by the time your finished with it you really begin to get a hang of what you're doing and think " BOY I'd really do a much better job, in 1/2 the time - the NEXT time"..
    I'm 57 - which is WHY - i think I can afford to build one - BUT THERE'S NOT going to be a NEXT time!

    Will pm you with questions my good man and thanks again for all the info!!!!!! :clap
    #24
  5. greywolves

    greywolves Too OLD to be a NOOB

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    THANKS for HELPING!

    BETTER search - I've usually been Googleing pole barn designs etc., Got some ideas for me? .

    Importance of truss designs? Just so you don't have supports in the middle of the floor? You built your own on one so sound like you've got a TON of knowledge on these??

    "Codes" on size only dictates that because I have 3 1/3 acres the county allows me ONLY 2400 sq. ft. of any and ALL outbuildings on my property.

    YOUR RIGHT about "Tornado Land" and I NEVER even thought about a block building. Just ASSUMED it would be too costly $$$$. I think I might have to look into this.
    #25
  6. greywolves

    greywolves Too OLD to be a NOOB

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    YEP,

    Thinking "Pole Barn"

    BUT - ASKING for ANY IDEAS! This is my FIRST time and PROBABLY my LAST time all in one shot. I'm 57 at this point - SO - I'd like to get it as "Right as Possible"!!!!!
    #26
  7. greywolves

    greywolves Too OLD to be a NOOB

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    Yes definitely doing a lift - IF - I've got any $$$ left.

    THANKS!
    #27
  8. KeithinSC

    KeithinSC Long timer

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    Watch for used lifts. I passed on one at an auction. 9000 lb off brand, went for $900. I just installed a Dannmar 11,000 lb two post. A mechanic in town was closing shop. It was 14 months old and I gave $1800. He paid $2500 new. The deals are out there, keep your ears open:ear
    Already came in handy, hung a deer from it for skinning! (also pulled the drriveshaft on my 1/2 ton!)

    Try to plan where it will be located before pouring the floor. Most 2 posts want a minimum thickness of 4.5" concrete at 3000 psi. As suggested earlier, a bit of extra depth where the pillars will be can make it easier. Many will go overkill with 12" footer with rebar or wire. Just make sure there are no cracks or expansion cuts under the pillars. LEVEL and FLAT are critical!

    My posts are about 12' tall, so keep that in mind when planning the building.
    #28
  9. Joetool

    Joetool Been here awhile

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    I'm getting ready to put a Monitor style pole barn in this spring. I have looked at Hansen pole buildings due to the fact that my Dad has a Direct buy discount (10%), but am also looking for companies that build it for you. Hansen will do a kit for around 17,000 that is dropped off at your site(32x32 with a 10 foot door in the middle bay and an upstairs with a 8' ceiling). If any one has any Colorado companies they cou;d recommend, that would be awesome...
    #29
  10. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    As you are talking about the building 1st , then buy the lift-you better be careful with ceiling clearances as IF? you don't know the lift brand,size,etc., then you lack necessary information. Also matters if will be lifting a PU vs. a sedan. As to DIY, I see the practicality of paying a crew but for me the fact we live on teacher retirement checks & spent much income raising 3 sons , DIY makes other things possible, such as travel,expensive hobbies like MC's,etc.. No matter who builds it you are the user & it has to fit your needs such as the lift question I raised. The concrete floor also needs to be considered for certain lift types.
    Some Ag schools have websites with various agricultural building plans. Your county ag agent may have access to some too. Box stores have books with plans but they are out there for free. I did a long truss for the front edge of my sawmill shed to enable long log entry way & I easily found truss designs on the web. I used resorcinol glue and nailed the chip board braces to the material. I live in an area of low labor costs & several truss builders here so they are economical that way too. If you have a tractor for the posts and hire a couple of laborers it's easy to place the posts in one day & frame them in a 2nd day then metal siding in another day. You can but the materials for very close to the same price as a build crew. As for getting it right you see you are the decider on the specs for your purpose anyway-have at it! If you don't have to count your money as we do-get it built & play with your time rather than work. I trade work with a neighbor-I sawed him from my logs an old fashioned corn crib pattern in trade for him helping me saw my logs.
    This spring I'm building a free standing carport which will be a pole bldg. I'll use 4x6 treated poles which may not meet code where you live but work fine & save me $$$.
    #30
  11. tommymerle

    tommymerle advwanabee

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    I built mine by myself and a little help from friends. Cheap was important for me so I went to Menards and got one of their kits. I was pleasantly shocked at how complete it was and easy to build.(I do have construction experience). I would say build it yourself. Everyone should feel the satisfaction of creating their own shelter.
    #31
  12. preppypyro

    preppypyro Been here awhile

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    I got a 40x60 building built last year. It has 16 foot high walls. I decided to get a local place build it for me as at that time I didnt have the time to do it. After taking pictures of every step and talking to the builders quite a bit, I wish I would have built it myself. It didnt take these guys long at all.

    I didnt get concrete in my building yet as I have to research slab floor options in the extreme cold we can have here, and the fact that I love the in floor heat.

    I think the total cost for my building was 24000, and about 9000 of that was strictly labour.

    I dont know if I would have done it differently either, but for me cost was a factor. When I had compared a pole shed to a stud frame, the stud frame was going to end up being almost twice as much when it was fully completed.
    #32
  13. chollo9

    chollo9 Screwed the Pooch

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    My .02

    36x48 main enclosed space with 12x48 shed roof along one side, 2300 sq. ft.
    concrete inside, optional under shed roof
    6x6 posts on 12' centers (but clearspan across interior space--your codes may vary)
    (I like a short course of concrete block for foundation, but walls can be built on pad)
    frame interior walls between posts
    trusses

    windows, doors, plumbing, electrical, . . . think about it a lot--it will be hard and expensive to do some things later, easy now.
    #33
  14. scooteraug02

    scooteraug02 Dog Rancher

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    #34
  15. greywolves

    greywolves Too OLD to be a NOOB

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    Hey Chollo9!

    WHY those dimensions? Enquiring minds NEED to know!

    Thanks for the ideas!
    #35
  16. greywolves

    greywolves Too OLD to be a NOOB

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    WOW, I've never seen anything like these. I can't put a car lift in those containers BUT I like the idea.

    You see folks on "American Pickers" using these to store stuff but I've never seen them used like this. This is WHY I asked the question here. DIVERSITY! They talk a lot about diversity at WORK but don't really mean it but I do. EVERYBODY has a whole DIFFERENT set of life / learning, etc. experiences that THEY alone bring to the table that helps them to think differently about EVERYTHING!

    "I" don't want to reinvent the wheel SO that's why I'm asking for ANYONE and EVERYONE to help me out!

    THANKS for the ideas :clap!
    #36
  17. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

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    [​IMG]

    If you heat with wood, you've gotta love this!

    Wood is under cover, backed up to a steel wall that can't be infested by carpenter ants (or worse) - it's brilliant!

    One thing I wonder about these containers though - do they trap humidity and become rot and mold factories?
    #37
  18. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    simple solar ventilation fans could solve that issue... i've considered the shipping container route in the past. that is a neat setup, for cheap...
    #38
  19. greywolves

    greywolves Too OLD to be a NOOB

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    How much $$$ for a shipping container these days?
    #39
  20. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    40' 2.5k-3.5k depending on location. you could call your local container rental company and ask if they want to sell any....
    #40