Powder coating my junk

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by sailah, May 23, 2013.

  1. 9Dave

    9Dave Bazinga!

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Oddometer:
    13,526
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    Nice work, Pete. A great resource to have around.
    #21
  2. wsmc831

    wsmc831 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    lol I was going to say the same thing. I usually just sand and wipe down, but too much prep is better than not enough. It's a fun hobby and pretty easy until one starts to get in parts that don't fit in a normal cooking oven.
    #22
  3. mudvaynedude122

    mudvaynedude122 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2013
    Oddometer:
    51
    Location:
    Florida
    I would kill to have a shop like that in my area. I didn't even know such a thing existed. I dont think I would spend any time at home. Great work on the powder coating.
    #23
  4. anonny

    anonny What could go wrong?

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,761
    Location:
    Beautiful Revelstoke BC
    See how many coats you can put on 1 piece without flocking, I paid a small fortune for my equipment and cant get 2.

    For great candys you need a bare minimum of 2 coats.
    #24
  5. mudvaynedude122

    mudvaynedude122 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2013
    Oddometer:
    51
    Location:
    Florida
    Which gun are you using and what is your grounding setup like? I am able to do 3 coats with my $44 Craftsman gun and a grounding rod setup, aiming to do 4 coats on a sign I am making later this month.
    #25
  6. Cat Daddy

    Cat Daddy Cob Artist

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    837
    Location:
    Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
    The most I've done is 9 coats.

    This bike frame is three coats. White base, apply stencils, maroon and orange mid coats, then peel stencils and clear top coat.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I've done a ton of these jobs. You're looking at body work, and then 3 coats on top of that.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    There's 9 coats total on this tank. Lots of body work.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #26
  7. Cat Daddy

    Cat Daddy Cob Artist

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    837
    Location:
    Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
    This is four coats total. White base, apply star stencil and mask, red, then blue, them clear vision top coat. The ceramic on the pipes is NIC Cerakote.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Lots of candy reds and blues. I like doing the bling.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    White inside for visibility, then black outside. Yellow lids with clear. Tie downs on lid black to match then riveted back into place.

    [​IMG]

    Engine cases. The masking will wear you out.

    [​IMG]

    Powder matched to Kawasaki Concours blue. I did a bunch of these crash bars for local Connie nuts.

    [​IMG]

    For people who say powder is too thick and obscures details. This is a bmw frame I did for a member on here. It does not cover details if you lay it on with a reasonable build thickness.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Same bmw. These were a beating getting them slick. They outgassed real bad.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #27
  8. anonny

    anonny What could go wrong?

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,761
    Location:
    Beautiful Revelstoke BC

    I am using an PBTP ES03 setup with separate copper clad ground rod(s) Ive had as many as 6 connected together and still no dice on multiple coats.
    #28
  9. josjor

    josjor Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,023
    Location:
    The largest geological formation in the U.S.A.
    Cool stuff. I do metals sculpting and have always wanted to mess with one of the home powdercoat kits from Eastwood.

    But I have to say, given the thread title I was initially going to come here and recommend Gold Bond.:D
    #29
  10. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,823
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap
    haha

    I powdercoated my Husky TXC swingarm yesterday. I had to leave it in the shop to cool overnight, pics later. It looks like it came out awesome.

    I scrubbed it down and dried it off. Sandblasted it. Scrubbed it with Greased Lightening. Offgassed it in the oven at 450 for 25 minutes. Sandblasted a couple spots again. Recleaned it, dried it. Shot it with Harley textured black, baked 380 for 20 minutes. Really happy with how it came out.
    #30
  11. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,823
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap
    CatDaddy, your work is just fantastic.:freaky

    Would you be willing to share the steps on how to get a good candy finish? I'd like to do a frame this winter, but I also know it's how you make a living.

    Couple other questions...

    What's the deal with hot-coating? If I am drying something off in the oven, what should the part temp be before I can shoot it? Is it desirable or does it even matter?

    I thought you couldn't do bodywork under pc?

    Is clearcoating as simple as it sounds? Can I bake the color on, let the part cool down to X degrees and then shoot clear and rebake? Do I adjust the bake times knowing that I will clear coat?

    Can you do exhaust coatings with a normal powdercoating setup?

    Thanks:D
    #31
  12. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,823
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap
    [​IMG]
    #32
  13. Cat Daddy

    Cat Daddy Cob Artist

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    837
    Location:
    Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
    As far as temps for coating, I shoot everything dead cold. If you shoot at any elevated temperature, you're gonna get too much film thickness. That's a sure fire method to a bad finish, is hot flocking. Take those frames for instance, if you shoot them hot, the head tube and other thick areas will stay hot longer than the thin sheetmetal sides. So as you apply your candy, you're gonna get too much powder on the hot areas and less on the thinner, colder areas. That's gonna be a guaranteed heartbreaker when you crack the oven door open in half and hour to see your final product. All of the thicker areas of the part will be a darker shade of candy than the thin ones. Splotchy....

    I do not do any high temp powder work. The product just isn't durable. All of my exhausts are Cerakote ceramic. That is a liquid product which I apply with a paint gun like normal paint. It's such good stuff, I can't rave enough about it.

    I did the exhausts on my own Royal Enfield and my TW200 last year to keep first hand tabs on durability in the long haul. It has not been disappointing. I love ceramic coating.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Clear powder is applied exactly like normal colored powder. You apply your color, cure, let cool down to room temperature, apply clear and cure again.

    I use clear on any two tone job I do to smooth the transition between the colors. I do a lot of stencil work on my two tones job. First, apply a base color and cure, then vinyl decals, apply second color, cure, pull decals off to expose the underlying base color, then clear the whole deal to smooth out the transitions.

    Bodywork is no problem at all. Use JB Weld for a filler or Metal-2-Metal body filler (by Evercoat). Block sand, fill, sand, fill as needed. Then KL primer over it all and block sand some more. Then color.

    I warn you though, a candy job can get real sketchy over bodywork. It's by far the biggest challenge in the craft. The filler doesn't have the same electrical conductivity as metal so you can easily get thin spots where the powder isn't even thickness across the entire part. That leads to splotches and subsequently a trip into the stripper tank to remove it all, and a complete redo of all your body work for a second attempt.
    #33
  14. Cat Daddy

    Cat Daddy Cob Artist

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    837
    Location:
    Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
    Two things I forgot to add.

    1) the high temp tape sold by powder supply houses is pure unadulterated steaming donkey shit. It lifts, and it shrinks under heat which will pull your powder edges with it as it cures. I use either Oracal sign vinyl or aircraft composite tape. The aircraft tape is super stuff. I have a source where I get it due to it being out of date. The FAA won't allow any out of date tape in any aircraft shop so it gets thrown away frequently. I don't have any such prejudices with expiration date and am very happy to use it. Barring having an inside source like I do, you can get it from aircraft supply houses that cater to home built aircraft guys.

    2) powder. NIC prismatic is the only place. Forget PBTP, Powder 365, Columbia etc. get it straight from the best. Yes, they are a bit slower as they make every batch of powder fresh when you order it. That will delay your order for 2-3 extra days, but its worth it. Price is comparable to the other places mentioned above. They have something like 6500 colors nowadays. Look at the gallery section of NIC Prismatic website. That's where you'll see the front runners in custom powdercoating displaying their work. I've got a few pictures of my work on there, but basically those guys make me look like a chump with my work compared to theirs.
    #34
  15. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,823
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap
    Great thanks. I've done very little coating but I want to do more. Your stencils are sweet.
    #35
  16. anonny

    anonny What could go wrong?

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,761
    Location:
    Beautiful Revelstoke BC

    I bought some body solder from Eastwood that's supposedly good for 450f that's conductive, haven't tried it yet but hope it will work as a filling alternative.
    #36