Practice/peg time

Discussion in 'Trials' started by toro618, Jul 26, 2013.

  1. toro618

    toro618 Been here awhile

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    Just curious, for those of you who compete, how many hours a week do you ride/practice? And what technique(s) or obstacles do you practice on mostly?
    #1
  2. StuInFH

    StuInFH Been here awhile

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    Judging by my results, not enough! :-) Heard an instructor say to practice your figure 8s (on the side of a hill with obstacles in the way if at that level) at least 10 minutes every session. And go over obstacles one class higher than the level you compete at. And exagerate the open legs, bent knees, rearward wt transfer, etc., cuz you will stiffen up in competition and lose a great deal of proper stance. Makes sense.

    Wish I could do 10% of what I know. ;-)
    #2
  3. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    When it mattered to me, I mostly rode all the time. But Tuesday, Thursday sunday worked well to keep on top of my class.( Work out M,W,F.) Two -three hours of hard riding. Practice just a little harder than your class. If you are just starting out, you have to master the basics. New riders usually either want to hop or fly right up the champ obstacles. But if you can not do basic turns and off cambers and transition to either, you will never get up that next obstacle.
    It`s much better to practice just the opposite of what you are good at. I`m just as guilty. I`m almost perfect at any left hand turn, hopping and nose wheelies. Take me right and my skill level drops considerably. So do not always ride the `fun` for your style sections. You have to learn what is hard or awkward for your abilities. Ride until you clean, clean, clean and more cleans!
    Sometimes it is hard to get your riding buddy to agree to practice the same. Ride the sections from the last event that gave you trouble. Or make your own to include your riding group ,but sneak in what you wanted to ride!
    #3
  4. BEEF706

    BEEF706 King of the dumb dab

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    All of this is true, and exactly mt experience at my first trials,
    #4
  5. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    If you are new to trials, the best possible advice is to get hold of a copy of the Bernie Scrieber book, and work on mastering the basic techniques outlined in the opening chapters.

    Most current trials instructional videos seem to be mainly concerned with trick riding techniques, which are about as much use to a beginner as politicians are to the economy!
    #5
  6. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 44 years

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    I like to practice maybe once a week. Curiously, I find I ride better in events if I don't practice right up to them, but rather lay off a while. I don't ride a bunch at events before them, to keep my energy up given I'm 56. And when it's hot, I do not get frisky on the loop, but go into a minimum expenditure mode so I can do bursts of efforts in the sections.

    Practice for me is also watching videos and making mental notes of things to try when I get on the bike.

    Helpful for practice is designing a section that is over my head and riding it over and over until I can consistently clean it. Since I practice alone much of the time, 'over my head' tends to be tight and technical rather than larger stuff like splatters. I wait until I have a riding partner to do those.
    #6
  7. ridenm

    ridenm Long timer

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    I rarely get to practice. I did however learn that daily commuting on my street bike helped my trials riding by doing things like practicing counterweighting and clutch control in parking lots and stop-n-go traffic.
    #7
  8. Rat 1

    Rat 1 n00b

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    Id like to get a copy of bernie's book, but have been told its out of print. And the new books/DVD's are leaning towards more trick stuff..
    Ive been riding for almost 30 years (sheesh..) and just keeping the basics of bike control is what I do in the back yard. I do have a few small logs and wooden pallets as well. Every little bit helps.
    #8
  9. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    Last year cases of Bernies book appeared and they used it for promoting the trials de nation team. Selling for 20-30 dollars. Has to be a few left over!
    #9
  10. cnybetass

    cnybetass Adventurer

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    We have a few Bernie books left in our club for sale .Let me no can get one to you.JR
    #10
  11. DerViking

    DerViking Shred

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    Someone above mentioned figure 8's. I would highly recommend this. Turn um nice and tight, in the driveway, on grass, over a two by four, etc.... I think it is the best, simplest practice you can do. Works all the basics, clutch, balance, steering. Lean way in to tighten the angle.

    I also intermittently ride my bicycle trials bike. Been doing more of that lately. Some things are much easier, like swinging the rear wheel, and some things are much harder. (more or less everything else) I find it helps me refine my balance to hop around awhile. The bike weight is negligible compared to a moto, and so doesn't compensate for small mistakes, making you more aware of them. Plus, in my current fitness, I am breathing hard after 30 minutes.
    #11
  12. mud

    mud I just wander.....

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    I don't get much time riding so most of it is actually at events, when I can make it to them.....

    One thing that was/is important to me is doing figure 8's on a variety of surfaces if you can. I was doing them in my yard on grass with really good traction, the second I got on slippery dry dirt I really struggled (still do, I really have to concentrate).
    #12
  13. Gordy

    Gordy Team Listo

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    The goal is to do things right and then have your sub-concious mind "remember" how you did it. This is the only way to build confidence and let your mind control your actions. Trials, MX or any competitive M/C activity has things happening all at once and incredibly fast so we have no time to think about what we are doing.
    We have to practice over and over and over and over.
    I think this is why Ryan Young says if you don't clean something after 3 times, move on. You certainly don't want your muscle memory to remember how to do things wrong.

    http://sportsnscience.utah.edu/musclememory/

    I have read that this requires constant imput. I really don't think that practice once a week at anything is enough to improve much. You might improve a little but will probably just stay pretty much where you are at. That is a broad statement and there are lots of things like genetics, natural balance, (if there is such a thing), risk taking/risk aversion, basic coordination, and youth that will come into play.

    If you want to improve at golf, you had better play more than once a day and hit balls every chance that you can. Why would something as complex as riding a trials bike be easier to get good at?

    So......here's my story and I'm sticking with it. If you want to improve at trials, you had better be riding somewhere, somehow 2-3 times a week. This can be at a practice area, an event or in your driveway. On the off days, ride your trials bicycle, work on a bosu ball or some other type of balance exercise. When I am healthy, this is what I do.

    Try this for 6 weeks and see what happens! :D

    Oh yeah, one of the most important things is to find a mentor. This person will take you to the next level by watching and coaching. IMO, this sport is impossible to learn by yourself. You NEED someone that understands the dynamics of what is going on and can get that into our thick heads.
    #13
  14. DerViking

    DerViking Shred

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    This is pretty good advice. On the other hand, I have cleaned sections that ate my lunch during a trial. Then i'll ride the section again, and nail it. This may be the lack of angst of competition more than anything. When I am having a shaky trial, I try to remember I am out here for fun, and that it doesn't really matter. Doesn't always work, but worth a shot.

    +1
    The mentor does not need to be a higher class rider than you. In AZ the morning riders check the afternoon. Some have been doing it for 30 years, that is a great deal of experience of a kind. Much of the best advice I have ever had has been from Hillslamer and Todd Roper, two of the most skilled and experienced riders I know, and two who take coaching very seriously, but the offhand comment from a friend checking you can be very valuable.
    #14
  15. thegraydog

    thegraydog 2 wheels X 6 ways

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    What Gordy said. What Motobene said. What Derviking said.

    Because it's what you CAN do after work at home, practice your short game. Just balance, and bump over curbs, and once you are bored with any move, stop a second and then try it. Bump your front wheel into the curb and hold balance with it. Ride up a tree -- Kaylee taught me that!

    Ask Phil Mickelson -- putting is critical!
    #15