R100GS oil change procedure question

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by scottw, May 15, 2004.

  1. scottw

    scottw Steppe Rider

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    Changed the oil today ('89 R100 GS). But when I put the filter back in and re-attached the oil cooler lines, I forgot to put back the two crush rings (one for each line). :doh

    Of course I didn't realize that until I put the new oil in, so now I have to choose between draining the new oil so I can pull the lines and put them back with the crush rings, or just going without. So my first three questions:

    1. Do I really need them in there, or can it wait until my next oil change?
    2. When I do put them back, do they go between the head of the bolt and the oil line, or between the oil line and the filter cover? They fell out quickly and I didn't see where they were in the assembly.
    3. Do I need to use new ones when I put them in? The old ones look fine.

    Finally, a bonus question: My book says in a oil change with filter change and in a bike with an oil cooler it should take 2.75 liters. I figure my bike's capacity might even be a tiny bit higher because I have the oil cooler relocated to behind the fender, so there is a bit more oil line invlolved. So in this oil change I put in about 2.5 liters, ran it for a couple of minutes, and then checked the dipstick. On the dipstick it is well over "full." :huh

    I can always drain some oil out, but I'm curious why it filled up so quickly. I let it drain for a long time (30+ minutes). Should I run it a bit more to be sure it is getting up through the oil cooler? Any ideas? :confused

    Thanks, Scott
    #1
  2. Infracaninophile

    Infracaninophile Finding My Way..

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    Scott:

    They call those the $4K crush washers. Why? Because if you don't get them back in the right place you will destroy you engine thus spending $4K to rebuild it. My bike is a 93 PD and thus slightly different. I suggest you go to your local BMW shop and sketch out a diagram of what goes where. That's what I did. I did the same for my old 74 R90/6.

    Do you have the aftermarket service manual? It has a decent explanation of what goes where.

    On my PD it's a pain in the ass to get the filter out. So, I change the oil every other time w/o changing the filter. I run the engine so easily that I don't worry about the filter that much with 70K miles on the bike.

    Hope this helps. Do NOT start your bike.

    My .02 until a better reply comes along.

    tom
    #2
  3. scottw

    scottw Steppe Rider

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    Wow, that's scary. :eek1

    I figured the worst I'd be looking at would be a leak from the area where the lines connect to the filter cover. I wonder why not having those in place would destroy the engine? It's not like they are keeping any foreign matter out of the oil; they're just crush washers.

    It sounds like I better get them back into place. Unfortunately I am a loooong way from the nearest BMW dealer, so I'll need to get my info from this forum. All my manuals (Clymer and Haynes) say is "put it all back the way it came out." If I knew the way it came out I wouldn't have the problem!

    What about the issue of re-using them? Any ideas on that?

    Thanks, Scott
    #3
  4. Rubber Cow

    Rubber Cow GS Dork

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    Scott,
    I believe that, if necessary, you can reuse the old crush rings. They may leak. The banjo type fittings are designed to work within a very tight tolerance gap. The oil path is essentially kept open by the spacing of those crush rings. Without them the oil path changes.
    That said, the R100GS motor can be operated without the oil cooler.
    In fact, there are oil cooler bypass devices (Touratech, Wudo,) that are designed to be used in the event that you munch the cooler while riding. My advice would be to toss (okay, lay it over gently) the bike onto its left side(opposite the cooler) and remove the lines and at least intall the old washers. Laying the bike on it's side will help you keep some of the oil in the crank case. You may want to remove the battery if you're using the standard open wet-cell, lead-acid type before laying the bike over to prevent an acid spillage.
    I'll get you the oil capacities in a few minutes.
    Cheers.
    Jorge
    #4
  5. Rubber Cow

    Rubber Cow GS Dork

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    Oil Capacity of the R100GS with filter change is 2.5 liters or 2.64 us qt.
    Cheers,
    Jorge
    #5
  6. twowheels

    twowheels Leaving Children behind

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    The 4k washer reference is about the washers around and inside the oil filter itself, not the ones that are between the banjo bolts and cooler.
    You don't have to drain the oil to change out those washers; put down a mat, lay the bike on its (left) side cylinder heads and replace the washers. As long as you aren't overfull with gas, the bike won't leak and you won't waste time. I do that method for adjusting valves and it works great. I also laid it on its side the other day, oh wait, that wasn't for the right reasons...

    Hope that helps.

    AW
    #6
  7. scottw

    scottw Steppe Rider

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    Thanks Jorge and AW. I never thought about laying the bike on its side. That's a great idea. Like AW said, I spend most of my time trying not to lay it down. :nod I have a sealed battery, so that won't be a problem.

    I appreciate the advice. :thumb :thumb

    -Scott
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  8. Cpt. Ron

    Cpt. Ron Advrider #128

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    Yup, the $3000 o-ring is the white one inside the filter cover. If the shimming and compression isn't right, the oil bypasses the filter and no oil goes to the oiling system (all oil in the airheads has to pass through the filter to get to the oil distribution system). And the bypass plate the Jorge talks of is VERY handy. I've used it once for a buddy, and it's currently on my bike.

    Re-install your old crush washers as described above. If the old ones are copper, clean and then heat them with a propane or MAP gas torch to anneal them to allow them to seal better. The aluminum ones don't work that way.
    #8
  9. scottw

    scottw Steppe Rider

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    Thanks for the info Capt.

    I put the bike over on the left side as Jorge recommended (left cylinder onto a cardboard box full of crushed newspaper). Worked great, and I was able to pull the oil cooler lines, reinstall the crush washers (aluminum) and get it all back together with only minimal oil leaking. Ran it for about 5 miles/8 minutes and had no leaks or other issues.

    Capt. Ron: I got the new white o-ring in there with no trouble. At least I think I did. It was in place as I laid the filter cover plate on the side of the bike and the bolts tightened up without any unusual tress, so I hope that means it is seated correctly. There was also a thin metal ring the same size as the white o-ring that slipped into place on the bike before the cover plate with o-rings (white and black) went on.

    I'm concerned about the shimming and compression issue. Is there any way to tell if the oil is or is not circulating correctly, short of the catastrophic method? I'm 95% sure I did everything right, but I don't want to discover otherwise by melting the engine. :cry

    Thanks, Scott
    #9
  10. Gary

    Gary Another Adventure Rider

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    Scott,

    Theres alot of good notes about this on the ibmwr.org tech articles site.

    A couple of notes as I understood them when I had my airhead:
    1) The metal shim that rides next to the white o-ring is to compress the o-ring a little more for a better seal.
    2) the paper gasket on the filter cover is optional and only used if the mating surface leaks. You will get more compression of the o-ring if you do not use the paper gasket.

    I kept the paper gasket on mine as that's the way it was when I got it (88 GS). The one thing that you must be VERY careful of is not to pinch the white o-ring when replacinig the filter cover. I used a little BMW red grease to hold it in place as I wiggled the cover back on.

    Pay close attention to the old o-ring when you change it to "get a read" on how it may be sealing.

    One other thing, I never disconnected the oil lines, just wiggled the plate off, back, and down. Use a long ball-end allen wrench to undo the bolts. You can make a really slick tool by cutting the bend off of the (4mm?) allen wrench and using a 4mm socket to drive it, or you can buy the expensive Snap-On tool.

    I second the value of carrying the oil filter eliminator hose (Touratech). If the cooler gets trashed, you're SOL.

    Gary
    #10
  11. Cpt. Ron

    Cpt. Ron Advrider #128

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    The metal shim goes on before the white o-ring. It is intended to prevent the oil filter end from damaging the o-ring. According to most wise airhead wrenches, the paper gasket is used very infrequently. The best way I've been told to tell is if the metal surfaces between the cover and the engine block both have a machined surface. There are a few instances where the canister (the part the filter rides within) is installed too shallow. The gasket will prevent the white o-ring from being compressed too much (allowing pressure to bypass the filter and thus the major engine damage).

    Lots more in-depth details here: http://www.airheads.org/index.php?Technical Tips
    and: http://home.jps.net/~snowbum/techindex.htm

    As for the oil cooler bypass, I prefer the block off plate versus the bypass hose. If the hoses to the cooler are damaged, the Touratech bypass line won't help. The block off plate eliminates the entire oil cooling system. I don't know who made mine, since it came with the bike. A machinist can make them easily enough, though.
    #11
  12. scottw

    scottw Steppe Rider

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    Thanks for the excellent guidance all. I hearby invite you all for a drink the next time you find yourselves in Ulaanbaatar. :freaky

    In the event your travels don't bring you to Mongolia in the next couple of years, I promise be good for it sometime in the future back home in the USA. :thumb

    -Scott
    #12
  13. Stephen

    Stephen Long timer

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    Just one more note...you don't have to disconnect the oil cooler lines to change the filter. You have to move the filter cover...just....so...to get it out of the way, but once you get the trick, it's simple. If your crash bars have been, uh, used, you might not be able to do it, IIRC.

    Mine always leaked with the alu washers. The parts guy at Lone Star said yep, use these and handed me copper ones. Much better.

    And hell, if I ever make it to Ulaanbaatar, I'll happily buy the beers.
    #13
  14. Motocicletta

    Motocicletta ridetowork

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    Look not to burn the oil lines on the hot headers, BTDT if you choose not to remove the lines from the cover
    #14