R45/64/80ST Rev Counter

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by igormortis, Mar 27, 2012.

  1. igormortis

    igormortis Cafe Reise

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    How do I get into this? The back unscrews, but I want to get behind the glass to clean it. Looks like the only way is to prise away the bezel - was hoping I wouldn't have to do that.

    [​IMG]

    Uhh... R64?? Must've fat-fingered that one...
    #1
  2. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    Yeah, the only way in is through the front. Be careful with that bezel, I'm not sure if they're available new any more, and yours actually looks pretty nice.
    #2
  3. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    If you must go into it, put a big hose clamp around the outside of the bezel and tighten it. Then go around and around and around the back side prying up the back edge little by little to avoid stretching the metal any more than necessary.

    Reinstallation is the reverse of the same process.

    Can't take credit for this trick - learned it on here from someone. Worked well on my speedo.
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  4. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    I have been into a couple without that hose clamp trick. Thanks a bunch! I learned a new trick! I will be real surprised if it doesn't help from the sound of it.
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  5. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    Glad that trick helped you guys out. If you don't support the outer edge while uncrimping, the bezel bulges out rather than unbends. You'll still be able to crimp it back on, but it won't be as tight and won't look as good with those ugly bulges. :wink:
    #5
  6. igormortis

    igormortis Cafe Reise

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    Thanks for the tips!

    I’m in two minds about doing this now. I’d like to get in there, but don’t wanna compromise weather-tightness either. Not that confident that I can re-crimp without it getting ugly.

    What are you guys using for the prying?
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  7. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    I want to say that I used a paint can opener - its been long enough that I can't recall for sure. But I know that was one of the first tools I reached for to start off. But then again, I have a couple of purpose-bent screwdrivers and ice picks that I may have employed getting the edge started. (If you ever need to bend something to shape, heat it past red hot then let cool slowly after bending. If needed you can always retemper by heating again to dull red and quenching).

    And yep, it was Wirespokes I got the clamp trick from - I had mental blank trying to remember who it was.
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  8. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    My 'prybar' is a modified screw driver. Took a few tries getting it right - it has to be sharp enough to get between the crimp and the housing, yet shaped in such a way that it won't cut it as it's being lifted. You also don't want the edge of the uncrimped bezel to have a bunch of ripples - that doesn't look good either.

    Sometimes those bezels are on so tight it's impossible not to slip - but it will all be invisible when the gauge is mounted, so not that big a deal.
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  9. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    Robert, you and I think alike about lots of tools and processes - and I'm just a hack amateur. But we make the tools to suit the jobs.

    And when shaping metal it is all about stretching and shrinking and how much you want to do/can do of either process. My smallest (cross) peening hammer is maybe 2-3 oz. Then again my biggest cross peen hammer is about 4 lbs. I don't even want to list all the English and metric hammers in between 10 lbs and 2 oz. :D Sometimes the work even calls for a drift to direct the blows from that 2-3 oz hammer (this whole paragraph is meant for general consumption, BTW)

    The neat thing to me is that one sometimes needs a certain amount of metal working skill in order to practice certain other machine repair skills. You have to get to it to fix it kind of scenario. Edit: And you need to develop a certain amount of tool making skill to support those first two.
    #9