Radio control nuts

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by RC Pilot, Apr 15, 2009.

  1. FPGT72

    FPGT72 Long timer

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    That is what I was thinking, I have a sand scorcher and rough rider and they are all very closed up.....not the originals but the Re-Re's. Sand scorcher is half built and the rough rider (or whatever they called it) is still in the box.

    I just can't decide on how to paint the body.

    If you are into this older Tamiya stuff you should check out Tamiya's site, I bought the rough rider silver ed. for under $200 direct from Tamiya....while the LHS wanted over $400 for the same car....but then it is a horizon shop like most LHS are anymore so don't expect a deal there.

    I really need to get back to work on that thing....I really want to do something like this for some reason

    [​IMG]
  2. gots_a_sol

    gots_a_sol Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Well I'm sure that was painful.

    <object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/ocqB6_y71xE?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/ocqB6_y71xE?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="560" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>


    And this looked very expensive

    <object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/zSHYpM1JDKE?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/zSHYpM1JDKE?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="560" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  3. Zoul

    Zoul No Comment

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    Kind of reminds me of this:

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  4. RC Pilot

    RC Pilot Shut up and fly!

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    If you look at other vids from sccmas, it is not surprising they have collisions like this. I may be wrong, but from what I have seen, they have very little field control.
  5. XpressCS

    XpressCS Must. Have. Lumens..

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    What "chance" do you speak of?? :huh

    I have dozens of Lipo packs sitting in my basement right now.
  6. a65l

    a65l Wise guy, eh?

    Joined:
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    So... been working on this for just over a year now. It's technically a rebuild, but not really, as I used a single square frame from the original plane and built the rest new. I'm trying to have it ready for our Mid Atlantic Dawn Patrol comning up in October... but school starts tomorrow and that's gonna put a major crimp in my work schedule... Anyway, pics show the fuse sitting on its gear for the first time, the wing on the fuse prior to building the wing struts, the wing on its struts, the sheeted wings and the completed landing gear assembly... The last two are the first one on the day of it's maiden, and then about 15 seconds after the maiden takeoff. You can see the frame I reused lying undamaged in the middle of the wreckage.

    BTW, it's a Fokker D8, 1/3 scale, built from Ron Weiss plans and a kit cut by Camden Kit Cutters. Been fun but I had to clear out the garage in order to have room to lay it out on the table...

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  7. Jimmy the Heater

    Jimmy the Heater Dirt Farmer

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    Eastern Washington State
    Another happy RC day. The friend on RC Groups that was going to send me a Tactic TTX404 for buddy boxing surprised the hell out of me and sent me a brand new TTX650!

    Between my friends that I've met through motorcycles and now the new ones I've met because of RC, I feel damn lucky :freaky

    [​IMG]
  8. FPGT72

    FPGT72 Long timer

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    Kingsville MO
    I have packs sitting in the basement as well....but none are charging.

    The chance is letting a pack get low and then recharging it....the chance is charging in anything that might let the magic smoke out. The chance is trusting your chargers.

    Personally I have had no problems at all....and I started with lipos before they got popular...taking apart scanners to get the batteries out then building 2 cell packs and flying my GWS tiger moth on them....but I do respect what they can do. I have on the other hand blown up 1400 packs in days gone by....as in kaboom....remember everything ran on sanyo batteries....then Panasonic brought some in....1700 I think. that was about the time I quit racing....battery wars.
  9. XpressCS

    XpressCS Must. Have. Lumens..

    Joined:
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    I keep mine at a storage charge of 3.85V/cell. My chargers have never failed me yet...
  10. Saget

    Saget Not quite a full house

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    Somewhere near Seattle

    15 seconds??? WTF happened? Hoping you have better luck the second time.
  11. biggziff

    biggziff Funk Soul Bruvah

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    Whoa....ya..wha' happen?
  12. merickk

    merickk Living Folk Tale

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    Looks like he zigged when he should of zagged. :dunno
  13. XR650L_Dave

    XR650L_Dave Long timer

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    lemme guess, ailerons or elevator was reversed...
  14. merickk

    merickk Living Folk Tale

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    That should of been checked before maiden :dunno But I've had aileron servos that checked out find on the ground, but once under load had 2 different travel rates/distance which causes bad things to happen :lol3
  15. Saget

    Saget Not quite a full house

    Joined:
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    Somewhere near Seattle
    For my latest project I wanted to design & build something different. Presenting the BFD, or Big F$#%ing Delta.

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    7' wingspan, 8-1/2 lbs with battery. 1300 sq. in., for a trainer-like wing loading of just 9.5 oz/sq-ft.

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    The fuselage is balsa & ply. Wings were cut from blue styrofoam insulation with spruce spars and a dowel leading edge. The wing panels plug in so I can get it in my car.

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    NTM Prop Drive 50-50 580 KV motor with 100 amp ESC. Notice I have the battery in the center of the fuselage, which proved to be a huge mistake. More on that later....

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Under the nose is a removable hatch, giving me a place to mount a camera with an unobstructed view. That will come after a few more test flights.

    And here's proof that it actually flies.

    <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oWXD75H-PS8?feature=player_embedded" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="360" width="640"></iframe>


    Now, about that battery location. I thought I had the CG location figured out before the first flight. I even built a 1/4 scale hand-launch glider to confirm it. I was wrong.

    I was just taxiing around in the back yard getting a feel for things. I had no intention of flying it yet (which is why I don't have video, dangit). Suddenly the breeze caught it and lifted it off the ground. I immediately knew it was tail heavy, since it was about 10 feet up, pointed straight up and nearly stopped!

    No room left to try a quick landing, all I could do was add throttle, shove the nose back down, and try to keep flying. It was BADLY pitch sensitive, going from straight up to straight down with the slightest elevator input. Even worse, turning would throw it into a spin. I managed to keep it pointed mostly skyward and gained some altitude, then walked across the road to the shooting range where I had more space.

    After nearly spinning it in 4 or 5 times, I figured out the throttle was working against me. By throttling back to an idle I could keep it mostly under control. I was able to make some very gentle turns and get it back for a scary but uneventful landing. Not a scratch!!

    The video above was the 2nd flight, with the battery all the way forward. The CG moved forward about 2 inches. Now it flies like a dream instead of a nightmare.
  16. a65l

    a65l Wise guy, eh?

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    So I'll fill you all in on the whole sordid story. I bought the plane off a radio control website with the initials R.C.U, if you don't know it already. They have a buy/sell section, and I thought the plane was a good deal for the size plane and all. Sight unseen, I might add, other than the pictures. Well, when I got it, as usual for me, there were multiple things I didn't like. I was rushing a little bit, trying to get some flight time before a big event we were having. I could never get a straight answer out of the guy I bought it from if he had flown it or not. I'm guessing not, given the results of my first flight.
    Anyhoo, I fixed what I didn't like, and modified a few things, but really wasn't overall happy with the plane. It's a big boy, 112" wingspan and the plans call for a flying weight of 26-28 lbs or thereabouts. This one was, I would guess conservatively, about 24 pounds. It was 24 pounds because the builder decided that it was better to not use the heavy and relatively pricey spruce and aircraft grade ply the plans called for and instead use Balsa wood and light ply. The next part is important. Of the same dimensions.

    Let me repeat. Of the same dimensions.

    Now, I'm not one to talk down other builders and hobbists. I don't know everything, and I'm certainly not qualified as a master aircraft builder. The guy I got this plane from had built qutie a few more planes than me, and as a matter of fact one of my club members had one. It was very nicely built, tight secuure joints, straight, fairly solid. But me, just me, if I'm going to substitute wood of, well, lesser strength in high stress areas, I'm going to increase it in dimension. I know balsa is strong wood, but if the designer calls for spruce of a certain dimension, I've gotta believe he knows what he's talking about.

    Anyway. So I fix this and I fix that, and leave a couple things because, gosh darn it, he must know what he's doing, right? And let's not forget, I checked the CG as well, and wound up adding almost 4 pounds of lead to the nose to get it to hang level at the reccomended balance point. But that's OK too, I have another airplane that balances well behind it's CG point, and it flies fine. So maybee he did fly it like that, and likes it that way. Who knows. I don't, and I do like my warbirds to be right on or slightly nose heavy, especially on the first couple of flights.

    Now I've got to talk about the wing attach method, because that's what failed. The Fokker D8 uses two sets of struts each side of the plane to hold the fuse to the wing. The fwd. struts are a tripod arrangement that bolts to a single point on the wing. The aft struts are single struts that bolt to the wing aft of the fwd struts. Convention would say that when bolting fairly important joints like that one would use either a block of hardwood, drilled and tapped, and a suitably long bolt, or a "T" nut with a bolt as well. The builder had, instead, installed a piece of 1/4" aircraft ply at the mount points, then drilled and tapped that to accept the bolt. I discovered this bit of engineering genius when I attached teh wing for the first time, and the bolts wouldn't tighten. Further, the foward struts (tripod arrangement, remember) consisted of three pieces of wire. The main wire was one piece from the bottom of the fuse to the bottom of the wing, where it fitted through a hole in a piece of angle aluminum. This was my failure point. Turns out that I should have put a wheel collar on that piece of wire before I tried to fly.
    Now, I did see this as a potential problem, but with the plane on the ground I moved the wing around as much as it was possible to, and picked the plane uip by the wing, and did everythign I could to determine if a wheel collar was needed there. I never saw the wire move, so I figured I was good.
    So, back to the maiden flight. AFter range check and multiple runs around on the ground, including a shutdown where I rechecked all the bolts and wires and wheel collars and control linkages, we were off. The takeoff was nice and straight, the engine seemed to make enough power, but just as it lifted off and passed out of ground effect I saw the wing "cock" to the left. The plane started to turn left, I applied corrective controls and it responded, at which time I started thinking about landing. I think I was starting to ease into a right turn when the wing seperated completly from the fuse. The fuse, of course, turned into a lawn dart. Good thing the ground at the field was soft, even though the prop broke I don't think the engine suffered any damage. The wing just fluttered down to the ground, unfortunately landing on a wingtip.

    The moral is, and my lesson is, if you think it's wrong it probablly is. I have to wonder, though, if that plane had survived it's maiden flight how long it would have lasted. We tend to toss the WWI planes around a bit, scale stuff and all that, and I don't think the wing spar would have survived it's first loop. Not to mention the fwd. upper struts were simply screwed into balsa! stringers. Oh, and the horizontal stab was all 1/4" sticks. That thing spans almost 24".

    This one I'm building is gonna come out heavier than the original, but that's fine. I'm pretty confident it's going to be under 30 lbs ready to fly, and at that weight it should do fine.

    I've got a funny story about control reversal too, and it's the reason I always check the controls three times before takeoff....
  17. XpressCS

    XpressCS Must. Have. Lumens..

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    Awesome! Want to build me one? :clap:rofl
  18. Jimmy the Heater

    Jimmy the Heater Dirt Farmer

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    Eastern Washington State
    Now that is one huge RC plane! Damn! Very very nice work there.
  19. FPGT72

    FPGT72 Long timer

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    That sucks....I am heartbroken when I crash a foam plane. Last one was I flew my 1400mm P51b into a tree. I fly in the front yard and am just having trouble with depth lately....I think it is some new meds. I am still putting back together one of the electrifly WWI planes...those are nice little planes for what they are.
  20. biggziff

    biggziff Funk Soul Bruvah

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    Took my youngest daughter and the Ural up to the RC field last night. Our club is one of the oldest on the east coast and is fortunate to own over 100 acres of land high up on a hill where we maintain 2 runways (grass) and several buildings. Last night was one of the last Pylon races of the season so we offered to help as cut judges. The last time I raced it was with my Scat Cat and things have changed a little bit since then. Most of the planes were V tails, but everything else was the same. Many of the guys who fly in the club are older...retired...60s. Some are fantastic pilots and others...well...not so much. In the second heat we watched "Bill" lose track of which plane was his and proceed to auger in wide open. It was not pretty. I didn't take any pics, but I am going to dust off the Scat Cat, renew my AMA and head up for the last 2 races to see if I can't shake things up a little. There are 2 guys, one much older than myself and one younger that generally run 1-2 in the series. I'll either auger in like Bill or end up in a mid-air with one of these guys...which would cause me to build a new Pylon racer and as we all know, it's all about the equipment. :)