Raleigh, North Carolina to La Ceiba, Honduras

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Be Gone For Good, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    Great. I guess I will definitely have to pack something to do for that crossing. :-) Do you by any chance remember which crossing you used for your crossing? My goal is to get to the Honduran border with enough extra time so we can just relax for however long it may take. Thank you for the heads up because I definitely will have to maintain my patience as some of these borders are crossed.
    #21
  2. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    I don't plan on moving quite this quickly but I am so glad to hear it is possible. Oh and "shared sex" motel? Does this mean we have both sexes at the motel or is sex the payment? I just need to let my wife know if this is the currency of the area.
    #22
  3. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    Thank you so much for this. Not to disregard the very real experiences that informed the previous posters but this aligns a bit more with my general attitude about travel. I lived most of my life in Chicago and routinely heard from my friends out of state how scary it must be to live in the nation's most dangerous city. I knew on a visceral level that the occurrences in my city were terrifying but I also knew that with just a little awareness almost all of it could be avoided. If the State Dept were to write a report about chicago it could easily discourage travel from one of the greatest places in the world. I didn't want to use that same rubric to deny myself any other country's experiences.

    I understand Mexico and CA can be dangerous but so can Chicago or Detroit or New Orleans but I am still going to go. I am doing my best to jam on spanish right now so I can at bare minimum understand just how much trouble I am in at the moment...

    I appreciate the offer to hit you up further for info and I will definitely take you up on that offer if you don't mind in the future.
    #23
  4. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    I'm not 100% certain, but I'm pretty sure, after checking my notes, that it was this crossing: from Tuxla Gutierrez to Talisman. https://www.google.com/maps/place/T...2!3d16.7516009!4d-93.1029939?hl=en&authuser=0

    It's a fairly rural area. I'd imagine that on most days, traffic across the border moves fairly quickly, but the day that I chose was not fast at all.

    Jamie
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  5. WhicheverAnyWayCan

    WhicheverAnyWayCan Deaf Biker

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    LOL ok maybe I wrote bad :p

    Staying at sex motel can be easier since each room has a private garage allowing me to leave my stuff on moto and just go up to the room and rest for the night. I spent two nights in 2 different sex motel in C. America.

    Parking at sex motel. The first time I stayed I was alone then second time with a riding buddy. Only thing I took to my room was the bathroom kit.
    [​IMG]

    Some sex motel charge by a hour which can get pricey but some charge by night. Be aware that once you check in, you can't just leave to explore the town or whatso. The first one is because when I got to town at 4pm, major of motels and hostels were booked due to festival so I rode out of town knowing I can find sex motel because they are usually seen before you get to the town or when you are getting out of town. :)
    #25
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  6. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Be Gone For Good , was that a question about the Honduran border specifically ?
    The notoriously slow and inefficient border crossing into Honduras as Jamie describes sounds as if he is writing about the EL AMATILLO passage from east end El Salvador . That one is always a massive mess of bureaucratic rubbish and waiting , while the so called helpers pester you .
    There are other crossings into Honduras which are much more efficient and speedy , particularly so at the Florido Copan entry from Guatemala and the Corinto crossing farther north is not too slack usually.

    In order to avoid getting stuck till a late dark hour with the border process your most sensible approach would be to arrange your riding day to do each and every border crossing starting at an early hour before noon. Do not try to set up your day to show up at a border in afternoon and risk getting bogged down .
    Do not try to do two border crossings in one day . Figure that the border will be the prime activity for that day.
    :imaposer every hotel and every motel on this planet can be categorized as a sex hotel , unless somebody can provide proof that no such activity EVER happens on their premises . With all the suburbs around US cities , do we call all of them sex suburbs, it must happen, seeing all the kids around ? :rofl
    These fancy "moteles de paso" are not brothels , it is a question of BYOB , but it is none of my /our business whether the couples that drive in or step out of taxis are married ...-to each other or anybody . If you know the details ....you have been asking :jack On the other hand there will be the odd inner city hotel where there may be a knock on the door at a late hour with an offer you can refuse , just leave the door closed and politely but firmly tell them to go away.

    Even at a full night the rates at these modern , clean well maintained "short stay motels " will be not higher than a motel in the USA, probably less, somewhere around $25- $35 . Timed rates are usually set in blocks of four hours.
    If you know one of these motels is charging by the time block you can make it work in your favour , they will have vacancies . Make your restaurant visit and sight seeing in town last until later in the evening and then you can check in at one of these motels for two blocks , an 8 hour period . This will let you get a good night of sleep ,secure bike parking and you can leave around sunrise. If you ask for a full night rate at a late hour they may actually not set a block-rate price , negotiate, ask for a lower price .
    If you booked a room and paid for the full night and you decide you want to still return to some part of the city center there is no reason why you can not do that - just make it unmistakably clear to the desk that you are going on an errand and that you WILL be coming back to your room . They will let you back in . But do you really need to , or want to ride around in the city very late into the night ?
    #26
  7. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    This thread has been super helpful for coming up with plans and we have our first meeting under our belts now. Our preliminary planning looks kind of like this.

    Brownsville to Tampico, Tampico to Vera Cruz, Vera Cruz to Villahermosa.

    From there we are planning on crossing into Guatemala at El Ceibo...

    After that we are still very much up in the air for the time being. There are still going to be a few opportunities to get our "planning committee" together. I have jumped into research pretty heavily these days so we can get a head start on finding desirable stopping points along the way. It looks like most of Mexico travel will be straight down 180.
    #27
  8. aesull

    aesull n00b

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    Are you planning to take your bikes over to Roatan? I'm doing so in October for a couple of weeks and am just wondering if you've researched what company to use. In 2016, I used Island Shipping to take a car from the mainland to the island, and I suppose I'll do that again with motorcycles if needed. They did what hey said they'd do, for about $140. Just wondering if there's an equally or more efficient option anyone knows of. Would be nice to be able to go with the bikes instead of taking the ferry or plane.

    EDIT: I spoke with a few friends on Roatan who say the ferry will take a "limited number" of bikes across. Can't believe I never took the ferry once in the years I lived there.
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  9. WhicheverAnyWayCan

    WhicheverAnyWayCan Deaf Biker

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    Be Gone For Good, ride safe and have fun!
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  10. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    aesull,

    I received this message from Oblio who is on site in Roatan and has some incredible advice. This is the way we are planning on going to get across. He also has a gorgeous place just next door to Anthony's Key if you need a place to stay for a couple of days.

    "You can put your bikes on the ferry: http://roatanferry.com/. It's about $30 per person and $40 per bike, one way. I've done this twice.

    Going from La Ceiba to Roatan, you also have to pay an exit tax. I forget how much it is....$5 or something. When you pull through the entrance to the ferry terminal, the guards should direct you to the little building where you pay this tax. Once you have that, proceed to the ferry dock/building. Don't pull into the parking lot where everyone else and the taxis are. Instead, keep riding another 50 feet or so to the open gate in the chain link fence on the left. This is the cargo area. Pull your bikes right in there and park. There will be guys working there and they'll direct you to the window where you'll pay for the bike's transport. You'll need your exit tax receipt, passport and proof of ownership/registration of the bike. If you have copies of everything that will save some time but they'll still want to see originals. They'll give you some paperwork which you'll take back to the guys in the cargo area. You'll buy your personal ticket for the ferry inside the terminal. Do that after you get your bikes taken care of. Oh, and don't upgrade to first class. It's not worth it.

    Stow as much gear as you can on the bikes so you don't have to lug it on the ferry and through security. But make sure everything is locked on the bike and take the keys with you. There is a tall guy that works the cargo area that speaks English well. He almost looks white. Talk to him and he'll make sure everything gets handled appropriately. Tip him $5 or so for his help, especially if he ends up translating for you at the cashier window, like he did for me.

    When you arrive on Roatan. Try to get off the boat and to the cargo pickup area quickly. The line forms fast. People and businesses ship all kinds of goods over on the ferry every day. As you enter the taxi area of the terminal, hang a right and you'll find the cargo area. Have your paperwork ready to show the attendant.

    The next time I put my bike on the ferry I'm going to ask the cargo guys if they can put the bike inside, instead of strapped to the back lower deck. The lower deck makes for a cool snap shot, but your bike gets coated in salt water mist. If it does, make sure you go to a car wash as soon as you get to Roatan. I learned the hard way just how destructive that salty mist can be if ignored.

    September is slow season so getting a room should be easy. I have a vacation rental on the north side if you're interested: https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/3469250. I don't recommend camping on Roatan. It's dangerous, hot, and buggy - especially in September.


    Give me a shout and I'll show you around! I rent snorkel gear, kayaks and paddleboards as well as teach freediving too."

    [​IMG]
    #30
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  11. aesull

    aesull n00b

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    Your friend is a really helpful person - that's some detailed info right there. Thanks a lot for passing it on! And yeah, I'd also suggest a few fresh water baths for the motos while there - that salty air is always working to destroy anything metal on the island (including my two cheap Chinese motos, my former house, etc.).

    Thanks!
    #31
  12. WhicheverAnyWayCan

    WhicheverAnyWayCan Deaf Biker

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    #32
  13. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    I didn't even think about it until I reread the message but I am hoping to have a pretty solid cover available too. Thank you for highlighting that issue.
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  14. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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  15. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    We are less than a week away from our leaving date for the big Honduran trip and time is flying. My hope is to get a few videos out over the next couple of days to show you all the packing and prep we have done for this trip. It takes quite a bit to travel by bike anywhere let alone across borders. We also have a new logo for BGFG and we are going to show it off here first.

    [​IMG]Without further ado, here is the new logo. We used a site called Logo Design Guru to get more than 100 different designs from freelance artists all vying for our grand prize. It is an amazing way to work with artists and I would suggest you use them if ever you need a logo created. Let us know what you think.

    We have planned our route but with the recent storms and flooding in Texas we might have to revise a little bit on the fly. We are excited to announce our first stop will likely be somewhere in southern Alabama. Our goal is Mobile with a fallback of Montgomery. If you are in the area and have a place for us to stay please send us a message. We will bring the beer. From there we are shooting for Austin on the second night so we can have a clean shot at the border for our third day. The weather and damage in Texas may force us to reroute but our hope is we will be able to keep the schedule pretty tight. If everything goes well, we will be leaving the US before noon on the third day. We will have our GPS updating the website all along the way if you would like to follow along or even send us a message. We will answer anything we can during our stops.
    #35
  16. SkizzMan

    SkizzMan aka SkiddMark ;^)

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    Sjoerd and others have covered a lot here already. Sjoerd and I disagree only about MX180. I think it's a suck route when you can ride the Sierra Madre range south for the price of a few added hours. There are some good coastal roads in Mexico but 180 is not one of them. Just my dos centavos.

    Anyway, go to the thread "Is Mexico Safe?", page one, and read through Tricepilot's post compiling Mexico travel wisdom. Digest it thoroughly. Many riders contributed to it. Reading a good Ride Report, or two, will also be useful.

    So you already know your trip will involve learning a very different way to ride. That's good. Topes, road signs, left blinker rules, flashing high beams, implied suicide lane.......there's much to learn. This is where Sjoerd's counsel is critical. Forget that guy riding 650 miles/day down there. Yeh, I've done that, too. But that's not good advice to give a newbie rider popping his México cherry. You'll be far better served easing into it, giving yourself time to learn, avoiding mistakes from fatigue, budgeting time for the unexpected. It's supposed to be a vacation, right? If 500 mile days feel about right in the States (for example) then 300 mile days will be roughly the equivalent in Mexico, energy-wise. If you clutch out at 8:00 am and get off the road by 4:00 pm you'll find that with fuel stops, meal breaks, wrong turns, lower average speeds, etc., you'll be doing well to log 300-350 miles/day unless you're slabbing the cuotas all day. And that's if nothing goes wrong like flatting, mechanical failure, diarrhea, whatever. I suggest trip planning for no more than a 300 mile daily average once you've left the US. That might not seem like much but it's a good average for planning given an inexperienced rider on a smaller bike.

    Suggest you route through Tennessee-Arkansas-Texas and stay off the coastal regions due to recent weather. That makes Laredo or Reynosa good choices for crossing. I favor Colombia Bridge for ease of crossing. Or Anzalduas bridge at Reynosa.

    ¡Buen Viaje!
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  17. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    Thank you so much for all the advice and resources. I am still very much in the thick of it as far as planning and revisions. We are definitely still a go for Saturday morning but the exact route is up for grabs. Hopefully, Google maps will have some suggestions as we go. We are very much looking forward to taking our time once we hit Mexico. We have planned for a lot of extra time and luckily there is plenty to see if we choose to slow down even further. I am hoping to be able to update you here as best as possible but if not please be prepared for a full ride report upon my return.
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  18. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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  19. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    #39
  20. Be Gone For Good

    Be Gone For Good Been here awhile

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    #40