Rear ended by a cop

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Tuna Helper, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. bloochdog

    bloochdog Itinerant jackass

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    Good point.:clap.

    Wet road, night, giving car ahead wide birth. Rider was acting responsibly.

    The LEO seems to be the type that has trouble with apologies.
    #61
  2. Midnightventure

    Midnightventure -

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    I have watched the video several times now and I can't believe anybody that is impartial would think the rider was at fault. The car on the left was clearly going to come over eventually.
    #62
  3. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    That's the way I see it. The rider may have been slightly timid, but prudent is the word I would use.

    The cop however...

    Jim :brow
    #63
  4. b1pig

    b1pig Been here awhile

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    officer was a dick. undisputed.
    officer rearended bike. undisputed.
    officer should be cited. undisputed.
    rider's actions as a contribution? disputed.

    what i'm getting at, is that the traffic was flowing. even slowing to allow the car over to merge, why the heck would anyone come to a complete and abrupt halt? the car was signalling a lane change, but had NOT crossed over the line. sure, i would have slowed so as not to be in the driver's blind spot and to give clearance, but i sure as heck would not have stopped when there was no need. i'm sure that all of you know the value of being aware of what is behind you as well as what is ahead and to the side.

    HAD it happened and i was investigating it, YES i would have cited the officer. on top of that ticket, he'd be getting his own little blanket party for making the rest of us look like asses. while most of us value our stuff too much to intentionally risk damaging it, others dont have that same value. thats where i'm going with the fraud statement. people are out there doing this. i've witnessed it first hand as the investigator. while it doesnt change what we as law enforcement does ON the scene... what we observe can affect the outcome later on. i'm not biased towards the officer because i'm one. i'm not biased towards the rider because i'm one. i am and will remain unbiased. what i've given is my observation of it.


    i'll just say this. i could end up any day on a ride with any of you. in any case, drinks for all and we'll be merry. we all have our opinions and we're all entitled to them. like me or not, i hate to see any of you guys end up under ANY car. ride safe and avoid the actions depicted in the video. right or wrong, at fault or not, better riding could have prevented it from happening the same as if the officer had not been as close.

    ride safe, guys.
    #64
  5. A-Wind

    A-Wind Andreas RD07a

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    I don't see either how this could be the rider's fault.

    He might have been an inexperienced rider and maybe a bit too cautious, but that is no reason to be rearended, especially by a trained professional driver.

    Courts hold commercial drivers to higher standards and I think it only fair to ask for Law Enforment to be held to the same standards.

    The officer should have recognized the situation and adjusted his driving accordingly.


    I was wondering about that too.

    In California (I assume in other States as well), after an accident, it is illegal to decline to exchange insurance information.

    So I think it would have been proper to ask for the Officer's information.
    #65
  6. Tonk

    Tonk Broken Adventurer

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    Why can't things like this be handeled in a responsible, respectable, professional, humane way. Here's the situation....

    Rider gets hit by tailgating cop but no real damage done (in this case).

    Cop approaches rider and says.... "I apologize for hitting you, are you OK?"

    Rider, seeing that he and the bike are fine says.... "I'm OK."

    They talk about the accident and exchange info if need be and move on.

    I know getting rear ended is a very serious and dangerous event and many riders have been hurt or killed by this. I'm sure this rider (and myself) learned a lot from this accident and will be a better rider in the future due to this experience. The cop also learned a lesson and will probably stop dicking with his cell phone, computer or wiener in the future and pay more attention to traffic.

    Some mandatory anger management for this cop wouldn't hurt either.
    #66
  7. b1pig

    b1pig Been here awhile

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    :clap
    #67
  8. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    :deal Well said, and how this "should" have played out.

    Jim :brow
    #68
  9. Flashmo

    Flashmo Whatever...

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    Deprivation of Rights under Color of Law.
    Title 18, U.S.C., Section 242.

    This is the Federal statute that fabrication of evidence is prosecuted under, including a fabricated report dealing with a minor traffic accident. Fabrication of evidence, of any kind, is a violation of a person's Fourth Amendment Rights.

    It also applies to extortion (as does the Hobbs Act). The motorcycle rider was extorted into "forgetting" the incident happened, under official threat of receiving tickets.

    With the right lawyer pushing on this, it could turn very wicked for the officer very quickly.

    At the least, the officer will most likely lose his job as this was criminal conduct. The city will probably want to distance itself and make a small settlement payment to the rider to prevent a civil action as well.
    #69
  10. SlowRoll

    SlowRoll One Day Closer To......

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    The cop is a Captain. Somehow, I don't think he's going to be penalized beyond the paid vacation.

    I've been rear-ended several times in a car (not on a bike yet). Once, my vehicle was totaled. The other times it was a minor damage or no damage bump.

    So, I've been conditioned to react in these types of accidents. I would have definitely gotten off the bike to check for damage. Even with a slight bump I know my FJR would have sustained damage.
    #70
  11. vivo

    vivo Adventurer

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    It does not matter WHY the biker stopped. The fact that the cop claims he could not stop that fast because of the way the biker applied his brakes is admission of guilt! He MUST be in control of his vehicle at all times and he MUST follow at sufficent distance to allow him to stop without crashing into the rear of the vehicle in front.

    Had the officer said he was sorry he bumped the biker instead of becoming aggressive it would be a non issue.

    I would like to see that officer suspended. I'm also pleased his face is known to the general public.

    It doesn't seem like the bike was traveling very fast. Not being able to stop your cruiser from 20 miles per hour isn't expert driving to say the least.

    Vivo
    #71
  12. H e a d N o r t h

    H e a d N o r t h (take the high road)

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    I've been struck from the rear on a motorcycle. In reality, I became aware of screetching sounds with just enough time to blip the throttle and get most of my bike out of the way.
    After the contact, I got off the bike, ascertained the damage (none, really), and nodded to the driver (who, by the white of his face and with his family yelling at him had clearly learned he needed to pay closer attention). Satisfied all was well, I toodled on my way with a good 'close shave' story.

    I agree, the incident in the video should have been a similar 'non-event'.

    But the officer's actions made this something much more significant. I'm the last one to make a big stink out of something minor, but Flashmo nailed it on the head a few posts back with the 'Deprivation of Rights' stuff.

    With an attitude like the one the LEO displayed, he needs some serious edumacation on civil rights! Which probably means escalating the issue by legal means.
    #72
  13. farmerstu

    farmerstu Been here awhile

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    cop needs to booted. period. not because he had a little accident,not because he wasn't paying attention. because of his obvious attitude problem. imo. a cop should never ever swear at or around a citizen. they should always be able to keep there emotions in check on the job.i 'm not saying it's easy.i would not be able to. but some cops need a refresher course on what the job is. protect and serve,not harass and intimate.
    #73
  14. Tepi

    Tepi Been here awhile

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    uhhuh... :D (ok, its nypd, but... just saying)
    #74
  15. farmerstu

    farmerstu Been here awhile

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    if only that were the prime directive.
    #75
  16. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    Are you so sure about that?

    I'm not defending him, there's no dispute he effed up,
    But he's a cop in Las Vegas, not Mayberry.
    Day in and day out he is dealing with the worst in human nature in a city that is a real armpit, there has to be an emotional price to pay.
    I'm not so sure booting him is the best answer, and the whole media/lawsuit fiasco does nothing more than line the pockets of a lawyer and crybaby at the tax payers expense.
    #76
  17. duck

    duck Banned

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    Actually the "fiasco" as you call it just might make other LEOs who engage in such behavior think twice about how they treat the citizens they supposedly serve.

    And, from news reports Iv'e read, no lawsuit has yet been filed by the "crybaby."
    #77
  18. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    Perhaps, but I have to question the judgment and motivations of someone who handles an issue like this by posting on utube rather than reporting it to the propper authorities in a responsible manner.
    #78
  19. Josephvman

    Josephvman I'm the Decider

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    Especially a cop! 100% cops fault, period. I thought the rider did a good job of controlling himself given the circumstance and the fact that the cop flat-out threatened him to cover his own ass. I doubt the rider has any recourse, but the fact that the entire motorcycle world knows that this cop is an idiot is some consolation. Hopefully his name and department will get out there. I don't understand why he couldn't just take responsibility for his lack of attention and be a stand-up guy instead of hiding behind the badge. Makes all cops look bad, and the vast majority of them are good guys doing a difficult job with very little reward.




    #79
  20. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    It's a bit more difficult to sweep it under the rug when it's on Youtube.
    #80