Rear ended by a cop

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Tuna Helper, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. GI_JO_NATHAN

    GI_JO_NATHAN Long timer

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    Nice!
  2. Offcamber

    Offcamber Long timer

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    :clap Awesome nice to know the system does work sometimes...I'd have asked for a public apology as well.
  3. Mr_Gone

    Mr_Gone Innocent culprit

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    Justice served. :clap
  4. markk9

    markk9 Been here awhile

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    Officer should not have been able to retire, should have been fired.
  5. feldjäger

    feldjäger Been here awhile

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    I don't think this guy should be able to think he can just retire and this will go away. Metro should keep him from retiring until the investigation is over. then after, if he isn't relieved, he should retire, and be gone already, hell maybe take a MRS Course and buy a bike!:evil
  6. SeaBass

    SeaBass Long timer

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    Who's going to deal with the accidents caused by jackasses dispersing pepper spray into moving traffic now???
  7. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    Did the "victim" and his attorney recieve any monitary settlement, or planning to seek damages?

    If the cop had an otherwise good service record, I think forced retirement is fair and appropriate.
  8. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    I don't think the "victim" deserves anything, unless the bike was damaged, but what happened with the cop, I agree with you!

    Jim :brow
  9. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    I'm asking because I don't understand why he has a lawyer.
  10. duck

    duck Banned

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    Since he was allowed to retire, I'm assuming he'll be getting a nice fat taxpayer funded pension.

    Not saying he does or doesn't deserve it. Just an observation.
  11. Mr_Gone

    Mr_Gone Innocent culprit

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    Without knowing the cop's work history, it's difficult for me to begrudge the guy his retirement/pension.

    Now, if he'd been a complete asshat for the last 20+ years, then he deserves nothing from our taxes.

    If he was generally a good cop who made a grievous mistake on a bad day... then I don't have a problem with "allowing" him to retire.

    I just don't have enough info.
  12. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    Retirement money is a contractual matter. It's earned by long service. Unless there's a specific forfeiture condition specified, it can't be denied. You can fire the guy, but you can't take away something he's already earned.
  13. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I bet he gets a pension, health care, and a new better job.


  14. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    :ear
    FYI, most police pensions are funded during service as part of their compensation. Pensions are administered and paid by the Teamsters, not the tax payers.

    An earned and vested pension can't be denied.
  15. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes

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    ...and I'm sure that early retirement is not merely an opportunity to mooch off the "system". When it's all accounted for, leaving his employment earlier than planned is going to cost him big time. He would still probably get to retire if he was fired and his reputation is shot either way, so at the end of the day, it just means his superior doesn't have to do as much paperwork.
  16. Riteris

    Riteris Dessert Runner

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    The inner Eeyore in me me thinks that motorcyclists in Nevada are going to pay something for the retirement of this cop.
  17. markk9

    markk9 Been here awhile

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    An LEO that understands how to control himself.
  18. arbutus

    arbutus Adventurer

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    Kind of sucks that he just gets to retire but at least he's off the streets. I hope he wasn't in the habit of acting like that. Maybe he had some kind of other stress going on in his life that he was trying to deal with and this pushed him over into asshole-dom. Not an excuse but maybe the cop doesn't normally do this kind of thing. Who knows.
    It was a minor incident, but the cop was totally in the wrong, both in regards to the rear-ending and the intimidation afterwards. I can't believe some people want to blame the rider for part of it. The white car was obviously a potential hazard. He/she was not flowing as you'd expect with traffic - it could have merged over as soon as the motorcycle let some space open up, but it didn't. Looks like it didn't want to slow down too much and was still up in line with the other car's bumper (the car in front of the bike). If the biker had been a car, it would have been showing behavior that was simply courteous and, you could argue, defensive driving. Anyone driving behind a vehicle that is doing what the biker did should be fully aware of that white car and clue-in to the fact that the person in front of you is trying to let them in and/or avoid being sideswiped, and you should prepare accordingly. If you want to tailgate, fine, but be goddamn ready to slam on your brakes. This is driving 101. The cop must have been less than 5 feet off the bike's bumper. Who can't stop in traffic that is going that slowly? What if the biker had been a cyclist?
    This is totally irrelevant but I wonder if the white car saw the cop back there and was being extra cautious not to hit the biker and make sure he/she was doing a nice lane change.
  19. GI_JO_NATHAN

    GI_JO_NATHAN Long timer

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    I agree with almost everything you said, except I think the cop seemed like an old pro at the intimidation thing.
  20. arbutus

    arbutus Adventurer

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    yeah, you're probably right