refused entry into peru at arica/tacna border

Discussion in 'Americas' started by mfbx8ds6, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. mfbx8ds6

    mfbx8ds6 Adventurer

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    I acquired my bike in Santiago off a fellow tourer who had brought the bike down from Colorado. The best solution we came up with for the transaction was with a legal authorization stating I have permission to travel in all the countries between Argentina and USA.

    Arrived at the arica/tacna border last friday (heading for peru) and was refused entry as the bike is not in my name. Told there was a chance on monday so slept at the frontera for three nights (great fun - although was amusing when I asked an official for a cigarette and he can back a minute later with an entire pack of previously confiscated cigarrettes). This morning somebody made a call but unfortunately it was another no.

    The border guard said mine was a common problem and I swear ive read elsewhere that other people have had a similar problem. Just wondering if anyone had any information that could help me or could put me in touch with someone who has been in the same situation.

    Is it worth trying another border? Am I going to have to completely bypass Peru i.e. mission it through bolivia/brazil/venezuela - is this even possible?
    #1
  2. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Bolivia, Brazil, Venezuela is doable but you could run into similar problems. The problem is that each day, with different border officials and different points of entry, the rules can change. One day you get in, the next you are denied.

    IMO, its always worth trying another border. You could always try the Bolivia border off the Paso Jama road near San Pedro de Atacama (no aduana, only migracion), go up through the SW altiplano where there is a very remote aduana post on the road to the big mine, cross Bolivia all the way to the north at Lago Titicaca, then attempt to re-enter Peru near Copacabana. I'm not suggesting that you skip aduana in Bolivia as your bike would be in the country illegally, but it is definitely possible to do along that route. Since the SW altiplano of Bolivia is so remote, you may even be able to wait to attempt to check your bike in with aduana when you arrive at Uyuni. Many travellers check their vehicles out of Bolivia in Uyuni, then ride the 3 or 4 days across the altiplano to the next border. I beleive that you have to do this if you are going to use the Ollague border from Bolivia to Chile.

    However, I'm not sure what they would do in Uyuni if they decide there that your bike is not allowed in the country. My guess is that it would work itself out as its not like you dont have any documentation at all.

    These borders see quite a few moto travelers so maybe they will let it go. At more remote borders, it may be possible to talk the officials into writing you a permiso for the bike, but obviously its something that you need to handle with kid gloves because you never know who you are dealing with. Its worth a shot at least. There are many possible things to try.

    If you can at all get the new title sent to you in your name that will make things quite a bit easier, but I realize that you may not have the time to do that.

    Suerte!
    #2
  3. Johnnydarock

    Johnnydarock Been here awhile

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    Crash is right. It may work once or even twice but you have many borders to cross between Chile and the States and will have to deal with this at every border unless you have someone back in the States help you get the right paperwork. In the mean time you can try to alter your paperwork before you get to the border. I had a job a few years ago and had to get a vehicle from Los Angeles to Cancun and was given the wrong paperwork by the fleet manager and could not get into Mexico when they checked the VIN. So I crossed back into the States and went to a copy shop and whited-out all the wrong info and typed it back on a copy...then copied that a few times to make it look a little fuzzy and I was back at the border in two hours...and got through....no problem. Trick is you have to have the same type on the entire document...but if you're a sneaky shit like me...I'd give it a try.

    John
    #3
  4. bones_708

    bones_708 Been here awhile

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    Is money tight? You also don't say where you are based out of. Anyway if it were me I would contact a title company in my home state and have then get me title in my name. I don't know how quick fed ex works to there but it should only take an afternoon for a title company to get everything taken care of. Worst case since it's a Colorado title get it transferred there into your name. Mailboxes can be rented for an address and title doesn't need legal residency.
    #4
  5. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Guess he must have figured it out? :dunno
    #5