Removing truck wheel with locking lug nut

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by arcanum, Aug 6, 2013.

  1. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,989
    Location:
    Baking in AZ
    ^^^THIS^^^

    I have done it countless times. I will use 6 point or 12 point, English or metric. Whatever doesn't fit but can be hammered over the lock. Beat it on, impact or cheater bar them loose.

    Chisels are bad, they tend to work the stud loose. Hit it wrong and you can bend the stud, stretch it, loose the interference fit to the flange and have a nut stuck to the stud and the stud spinning in the flange. Now you have big issues!

    There are special sockets, I find the hammer a socket over the bolt works better then the special tools. I have even installed (and torqued no less) locking lugnuts with the hammer a socket in place trick. No reason to get any more complicated then that.
    #21
  2. arcanum

    arcanum Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    317
    Location:
    Arcanum OH
    I tried drilling thru the tin cap and using the acetone/ATF but still no go. It was not really a corrosion issue anyway, but badly distorted threads.
    What was the most efficient thing to do [in my opinion] was to start with a sharp 1/8' drill bit and drill the stud to the base of the threads and then use larger and larger bit sizes until I had at at a half inch. They came right off with a socket and breaker bar very easily.
    I did break off a drill bit. I then had to drill two extra holes outside the broken bit, split the nut and stud, and get a ball shaped grinding stone to grind away the whole mess down to the wheel surface. Took an extra hour,but i saved the wheel.
    The tin covers convinced me that I made the right choice. I figured that it was better to lose some studs to drilling that were crap anyway and that made it easy to get the lug nuts off.
    I cut the stud remnants off square, used penetrating oil and heat and then pounded what remained of the stud back thru the wheel hub. I was able to use a spacer and the impact wrench to seat a brand new stud in the wheel hub without removing the axle Thank you Jesus!

    Not saying my way was the best way,but just wanted to add some info to the mix. Thanks for your help and especially Troidus,whose method I chose to make the repair.
    #22
  3. slowpoke69

    slowpoke69 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Oddometer:
    606
    Location:
    So. Jersey
    I've done this many times, no need to buy or rent something.
    #23