Reynolds "Ride Off" bump stops?

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by More_Miles, Jul 13, 2012.

  1. More_Miles

    More_Miles über-n00b

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    Hey all!

    After having the centre stand on my '83 RT self destruct (tops mushroomed and egg shaped holes) I acquired a Reynolds "Ride Off" stand. Frankly I have no intention of ever "riding off" the stand. What I want to know is if I'm nissing something. The stand, as installed, comes nowhere near the rubber bumper stop the stock stand used. It's resting against the rear cross over exhaust pipe. Am I missing a part?

    Just a couple observations from fitting it in the shed last night.

    1. Getting the bike on the stand requires less effort. In fact I can do it with by stepping on the stand alone if I work at it
    2. Getting the bike on the stand involves less drama. With the stock stand, the bike was jacked so far up in the air, when it passed the "tipping point" there is no way to avoid having the full weight of it smash down on the lugs and end of the stand. At least I can't figure out a way to do it.
    3. Getting the bike off the stand, like getting it on the stand, is much more drama free. You don't have to try and push it "uphill" as much.
    4. Tire changes are going to be a bit (more) of an aggravation.
    5. The bike seems more stable on the stand. This may be a non-point as I've never had the bike fall over on the centre stand. Just a moment, I need to find some wood on which to knock....
    I know that people seem to either love or hate these stands. We'll see what my long term decision is once I figure out if it's *supposed* to sit against that exhaust pipe!
    #1
  2. Boxerworks

    Boxerworks g00b

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    Your original stand was probably just worn out. Nobody thought to maintain that critical part much like the sidestand on these bikes. The reynolds stand is merely a gimmick stand IMO. They were cheaper than a new centerstand, like a brown sidestand. im told they were made for CO motor cops who wanted to "ride off" in pursuit of revenue not serious riders who ride in varying conditions/terrain. If you like the results great but if u want anything to change u will have to customize to suit you.
    If you have never experienced a proper centerstand on your bike you dont know what your missing. l will also go so far as to suggest that half of all damage to RT models resulted from use of cheap owners buying cheap aftermarket stands... Then the future owners never knew any better. Many airhead riders never knew a stand on one of these bikes in proper working order so folks kept replacing worn out stands with inferior parts for the sake of cheapness.
    There are riders who do benefit from these stands. Elderly injured and weak riders. I have only come to this conclusion after a few hundred thousand miles of Airhead riding experience...:muutt
    #2
  3. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    ...hows it going?! I had a R Ride off on my /5, my first airhead. Man, I loved that thing. Never had a bike that I could put on the centerstand as easy as the reynolds. But I was missing the springs, and had to make my own out of several different trials springs. I highly doubt you'll be able to source any part for that stand. I will say that my centerstand on my ST has always bumped on the collector. I bet you could make something using rubber corks as bumpers, and be able to keep it away from the crossover. Good luck!!!
    #3
  4. 100RT

    100RT Long timer

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    I have a Reynolds on my 81 R100RT and love it!. I have used that stand for many thousands of miles and many years with no problems at all. The only down side is if you need to remove a wheel you need a coupld short pieces of wood to raise it up. When I fully packed for a camping rally I do use the "ride off" advantage.

    The most important thing is this, Reynolds made many variations of that stand and they have model numbers stamped on them. You have to use the proper stand for your bike. Look for a number at the top near the mounting holes. Usually a number like 328 etc. I had to make my own bump stop.
    #4
  5. crazydrummerdude

    crazydrummerdude Wacky Bongo Boy

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    Holy crap.
    #5
  6. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    I take exception to this.

    On the other comments, I recently posted these in another Centerstand Thread. My modification is not a ride-off stand, but adds a similar cross-bar to the stock stand. Note the extra rubber bumper so that the bar clears the brake lever. "HTH"

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=19055326&postcount=34

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=19056650&postcount=36

    Hell, is this a yet another variation on the tire/oil/battery thread?????

    :lol3
    #6
  7. Horsehockey

    Horsehockey A GPS? Huh?

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    +1. Matt Richards at Boxerworks: Business Strategies 101: Don't insult the potential customers to their face.
    #7
  8. Boxerworks

    Boxerworks g00b

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    in my own defense i did say this is my opinion. I'm not insulting anyone here. and I know i don't post on here enough for my opinion to matter much...

    Fact. Reynolds products(and most aftermarket accessories period ever) were made to compete with stock parts based on price(some people call that cheap)... performance is usually an after thought when it comes to lower price alternatives based on my experience. a Reynolds ride off is the equivalent to a stock stand as MAC mufflers are to OEM Zeuna mufflers. They for the most part do the job but compared to stock they are largely considered cheap...er alternatives and usually pale in performance :deal Note a stock centerstand for a 81-84 Airhead costs $350 and you can still scare up a used Reynolds for $50 if your lucky. when new a Reynolds was about 1/2 what a stock one cost.

    Now the 81-84 Airheads had center stands that MANY riders complained about. They worked just fine and in a variety of conditions, they just required more effort to deploy and retract than the older generation Airheads. AND stereotypically many riders who purchased these Airheads which were approximately double the cost of the Japanese equivalent new the buyers were were usually more "experienced" they often had ailments (like injuries and age) working against them so many bikes got things like Reynolds ride off stands to accommodate the more "seasoned" rider.

    And modifying a bike with extra bumpers or corks just to accommodate some accessory sounds plain CHEAP to me...

    Didn't try to come off like a jerk, I'm lying in bed eating antibiotics hoping I'm well enough to make the MOA rally:sick
    #8
  9. Horsehockey

    Horsehockey A GPS? Huh?

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    This not serious, cheap, elderly and somewhat injured rider (if aging a** and wrists qualifies for that) is departing at 0400 tomorrow on a 3k mile trip on his 37 year old airhead. At every gas stop and at the end of every long day, my back thanks me for having a Reynolds.

    Hope you're feeling better soon. Don't forget your camelbak on the Sedalia trip.
    #9
  10. More_Miles

    More_Miles über-n00b

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    Hey Jenna! How's things? Can't complain here. Not riding as much as I want, nor fishing nor canoeing. Something about having to work for a living unfortunately.

    Actually I got the bushings and springs, even though I already had new bushings ready to go. The interesting thing was that the springs with the Reynolds I got are exactly the same length and shape as the springs with the stock stand. I ended up just reusing the stock springs as they were already dangling there.

    About what I expected. At least when in the shop, I can use the motorcycle jack. As for when I'm on the road, I'm sure I can improvize something from the ditch debris or even do like you and carry a couple blocks.

    Additionally, I didn't intend to ignite a neo-oil /tire thread ( I use slippery, liquid oil and round tires for what it's worth! :D) and I will admit my ignorance on the physical aspects of airhead handling. IS there a way to elegantly and gently put an RT with all that extra weight up on the centre stand? There is no air head "community" around here. In fact as far as I know, I am the only one who rides one. So there is no one for me to ask "just how in the hell do you DO this?" The guy I bought the bike from just heaved and let it crash. About as elegant as a tornado in an anvil factory.

    That said, I also have a "new-to-me" stock stand that just arrived. I'll probably put it on in a week or two to just compare.
    #10
  11. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    Nah, ya didn't. You're a newcomer to the Insanity and unless you're used to them, R-bike centerstands are a PITA. I've had mine forever and a day and I don't know no better... :D

    Matt- no sweat. Most of us read 'tween the lines... :D
    #11
  12. DaveBall

    DaveBall Long timer

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    I have continuously owned at least 1 RT since 1979. I learned how to use the stock centre stand a long time ago and actualy find it very easy to use. If your getting a crash, then you have a problem with either the mounts or the top of the stand is badly worn. I was taught the procedure back around 1975 by a little slip of a girl that had an R75/5 with a full fairing and a set of Craven saddle bags, fully loaded. Once I practiced a few times, it just was so easy and simple.

    To deploy correctly, you would first push the centre stand down with the tab, then move your right foot to the back of the foot of the stand. Once you have your right foot set, then put your right hand on the grab handle and left on the left handlbar. then pull back and up with a smooth motion, while pressing down on the rear of the foot of the stand. It should just roll right up onto the stand. It does take a little more effort than the Reynolds Ride-Off, but as far as I am concerned, I prefer it. I have had both. I think the trick is all in the way you use the right side of your body. Right foot pressing down and right hand pulling up and back. I have been doing it so long, it is hard to actually analyze it in my head.

    If you are getting a "crash" when the stock stand gets over centre and gets to it's "sitting" position, then the stops on the stand are usually worn out. This is a common issue that has been noted many times over the years. This is usually caused by not deploying in a smooth method and trying the jerk the bike back onto the stand. This eventually pounds the stops and makes the stand go too far past centre. This can be fixed. There used to be a procedure with pictures somewhere on the web. Can't remember where at the moment. If I find it I will post a link.
    #12
  13. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    Yeah, putting an R-bike on the centerstand is a process not unlike throwing someone on the ground with Judo. It's all in leverage and smoothness.

    Look a couple of posts up (post #6) where I posted a link to a couple of pics-- that has a "proper" stop rebuilt. The "angle" of the centerstand with the ground should be 7-8 degrees from vertical...
    #13
  14. Rucksta

    Rucksta SS Blowhard

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    I ride off my stock stand and can deploy the stand one handed with bare feet.
    Either the front or the rear wheel is clear of the ground making wheel work easy.

    What's the deal with needing a replacement?
    #14
  15. More_Miles

    More_Miles über-n00b

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    I guess you folks from the land down under are tougher than us folks from the Great White North! :evil

    Even with the knackered, worn out stand, I never had a real problem getting the bike onto it. Getting it off the stand was always more chancy, especially loaded. The contact points on the stand, where the frame lugs stopped the rotation of the stand, were battered way out of shape. Also, years of no lube had destroyed the bushings and caused the holes in the stand to go oval. So what would happen, bringing it up on the stand, once past the point of no return, the stand would extend a little to far, causing the weight of the bike to "fall" from a greater height on it, smashing the ends of the stand a little more out of shape. The next time that would happen, it would fall a bit further, hitting a bit harder, rinse and repeat. So at one point the stand was so far ahead I couldn't lift it "uphill" enough to get it off the stand. I had to lay the bike over on it's side in the parking lot to put the stand back up! :eek1

    At this point, my own stupidity comes to the fore. I took the stand off, and took it to a local welder. He repaired the ends of the stand and gave it a coat of paint. Everything was fine for a couple weeks until it missed the lugs one day! The bushings were shot (I didn't know they were supposed to have flanges as mine didn't!) and the top of the stand spread apart. So once again, over it went and the stand was put up. I bent it back into shape, but it wouldn't stay. About a week later, same thing. Take it apart and really LOOK at it and I found that

    1. the bushings were shot
    2. the holes where the bushings ride were shot
    3. I suspect that I had weakened the metal in the stand by having it welded
    So, new bushings were acquired, as well as a second hand Reynolds as well as a second hand stock stand. And thus begins my adventures in centre stand experimentation!
    #15
  16. wirewrkr

    wirewrkr the thread-killer

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    All I can add to this is that I strongly recommend that be it a stock or Reynolds, Don't ride off your stand.
    If you must, just keep me in mind when it's time for the thread inserts.
    Oh, and for you post 80 bike riders, no such luck. Worse case scenario, I am replacing the entire lugs on an inmates GS frame.
    #16
  17. Solo Lobo

    Solo Lobo airhead or nothing

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    I had a ride-off on my first R100RS... it was always fun to watch the bike "walk" across the parking garage floor away from me as I had it warming up while putting on my helmet... this was with the choke on and the bike idling around 2K
    #17
  18. Schlivitz

    Schlivitz Mercury Freefall

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    Mine walks around too but I deal with it. Here in East TN I'm always parked on a slope. I keep meaning to rap some hose around the base or something like that. But when I have time to spend with my Airhead I usually just ride it. I do like the Reynolds. Much less drama than stock. But how much f'n service does a centerstand require? Not that it really matters for me. My bike self-lubricates most of its lower extremities.
    #18
  19. blaine.hale

    blaine.hale Long timer

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    I heard the Reynolds could potentially damage your frame center stand mount points if you actually use the "ride off" feature.
    I had one on my bike when I bought it and the tabs for CC mounting were twisted and stripped out completely. It's much more likely that it was years and years of abuse from a PO but I got that Reynolds off in a hurry. Also, I remember some silly person getting on my bike to try it on for size and accidentally bumping it forward a bit, rolling it off the stand...I wasn't about to have that.
    Long story shot...I have a free Reynolds in my basement for anyone in the Atlanta area :lol3 (it doesn't have the springs or those rings to mount the springs to the frame...so really it's scrap metal.)
    #19
  20. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    :lol3
    #20