Rider Fatigue ??

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by johnny rehab, Feb 27, 2007.

  1. johnny rehab

    johnny rehab n00b

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    I need some insight . I bought a 650 gs last spring and im looking to take a trip . The need to know is just how long can I ride . Word around the camp fire is 300 miles 6 hrs per day. Any suggestions.
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  2. jehu

    jehu ∩HƏſ

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    It's up to you.
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  3. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

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    I would say that's the minimum. I can do 5~600 mile days on my ST1100 with out much fatigue. Different bike though.
    I've found a lot of it is just doing some long days and getting used to the feeling.
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  4. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

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    i've done long rides with other guys on 650's although never done a long day myself on one... we did ten 500 - 800 mile days in a row on the alcan, and there were two 650 gs's... i would easily do 1000 miles and probably more on a 650gs... shit... did 1500 in just over a day on my 640 ktm... it's all about your personal comfort though
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  5. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

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    I think it more depends on you than the bike. Once you're used to long distance riding, I don't see any reason why you couldn't do a thousand mile day on the F650. It's a comfy bike.

    You just have to get your system down...don't try to ride too fast, take short breaks every hour, drink lots of liquids, etc.
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  6. johnny rehab

    johnny rehab n00b

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    Hey thanks for the help .I never dreamed that you could ride that kind of distance . And still be safe and comfortable .
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  7. iridefar

    iridefar Been here awhile

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    I have done several Iron Butt rides. On the ST1100 I can go 1000 to 1300 miles per day no problem. On the Gold Wing I can do 800 to 1000 (more gas stops). I have done IBA rides on a VTX1800C with no problems. But the F650GS tires me out after about 600 miles. There is little wind protection and it gets blown around more at interstate speeds, so you are working harder to ride it. But that is what makes it even more fun to ride (in my opinion).

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  8. murgatroid42

    murgatroid42 Great Adventurer

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    Get some good gear. Try it on and make sure it fits. A comfortable helmet, jacket, pants, etc. will keep out the wind and elements, and makes riding far less tiresome.
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  9. SinFrenas

    SinFrenas banal leakage

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    earplugs. spandex drawers + gold bond powder. lots of breaks. astronaut naps (rest stop table, gear on, gloves under helmet, 15 min.). loads of water + emergen-c powder. sheepskin seatcover. etc.

    imho, riding fatigue isn't cumulative. after 2 hrs. and your legs and back are killing you, have a break. 15 min. off the bike and you're good as new.

    thus, with an early start, 600 mile days on a dualsport are no sweat. many do much more. ymmv; have fun!
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  10. Jeffro115

    Jeffro115 Redemption.

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    You gotta get out and do a 'dry run,' i.e. practice ride. Set up a loop that will let you travel whatever distance you plan on doing, but close enough that you can cut it short if need be. I'd say be no more than 2 hours away from home towards the later end of the trip.

    Riding that distance in practice is the only way you'll really be able to find out how far you can go.



    I've put in a few 600 mile days on my V-Strom. So I thought it wouldn't be too bad when I tried it on my XR.


    I'll never make that mistake again.:deal :lol3

    All the vibration and wind really took it out of me through this trip. I was way more tired than I thought I'd be. Plus, at higher highway speeds, I ended up making two more gas stops than I thought I'd have to, which really killed my time and planning.


    Having the right gear helps (don't forget a rainsuit) but the only way you'll know how you'll feel at the end of the day is by putting a long day in the saddle.


    Good luck!
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  11. Jeffro115

    Jeffro115 Redemption.

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    P.S. earplugs are almost mandatory on a long trip. You'll feel a lot fresher when you aren't as exposed to the constant noise of the wind flying by.

    I also take some Advil with me, and later in a ride on a long day, just when I start to feel a bit sore, I take them. That seems to help me continue to be comfortable and enjoy myself a bit more.

    Enjoying the ride is part of the trip. Be comfortable and do whatever it takes to stay warm and dry.

    If you're tired or sore, a short break to get a candy bar and a cold drink goes a real long way. A short walk can work out fatigue and stiffness like you wouldn't believe.



    A Camelbak or some way to sip something to drink while riding is a big help too. It's easy to get dehydrated on a bike, even when it isn't that hot outside.
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  12. wmccs

    wmccs Adventurer

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    It depends on what kind of roads your riding, and what kind of elements you&#8217;re facing. The answer to your question will be different for every individual. Monitoring fatigue level is paramount. No one can tell you how long is a safe distance to ride. If you ride from Los Angeles to the Oregon border on Interstate 5 your fatigue level will be very different than if you took Coastal Highway One instead (Highway one would be my choice).

    I destroyed a FZ1 and nearly killed myself because I wasn't paying attention to my Fatigue level. Pay close attention to how you&#8217;re feeling. Stop, and get off the bike frequently. Even five minutes off the bike can queue you into your fatigue level.
    #12
  13. Don Gavino

    Don Gavino Michigan Catracho

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    I am planning the same sort of thing. I want to be in Manhattan for 4th of JUly. I am planning a straight run from Midland, MI leaving at 4:30 am on a DL 650. The pipe dream is to be downtown by 4pm. I may spend the night after crossing into NY from Canada though. I definately getting a sheepskin butt pad, I have a Camelbak and will be eating Snickers and taking walk breaks. There will be probably be some Painaids in there too.
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  14. PacWestGS

    PacWestGS Life Is The Adventure!

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    Can't say how many miles, yur body will tell you. But six to ten hours a day in the saddle is possible. How many miles will that be - depends on the road and speed. Interstate plan on an average speed of 65 mph (this includes running very fast but making gas, piss, and food stops) If, secondary roads that average might be down around 45mph.

    Start out small, build up over each day, and PLAN to finsh small again.

    Don't forget to enjoy the trip - blasting past everything to make time/mileage is not the best way to travel.

    Don't push yurself when you get stupid - bad things usually happen quickly.

    Have fun
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  15. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    The one thing that I find that will tire me out very quickly is riding in gusty winds. The noise and buffeting off of a poorly fitted windscreen will quickly fatigue you. Surprisingly a shorter screen that leave your head completly exposed is better than one where the wind is constantly being battered about by wind coming off the screen..
    #15
  16. Jacob Mayer

    Jacob Mayer Knee Dragger

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    Comfort is the key, IMHO. If the bike doesn't fit you, or you're wearing crappy, ill-fitting gear, you won't last two hours. Pain and discomfort are very fatiguing.

    Case in point: new, my K12RS killed my butt and back after less than 100 miles, and my poor-fitting helmet (the only one that came close at the time - I have a big, funny shaped head) gave me a big red dot on my forehead. Now, with a saddle, risers, excellent Arai helmet, and good gear, I can pull over 1000 miles in a day.

    As others have said, seamless, synthetic underwear is a good idea as is avoiding denim and other cotton materials -- you either end up frozen 'cuz you sweated in your gear then got cold, or you get a wicked case of monkey butt from all the sweat and irritation on a hot day.

    Much depends on the roads you'll be on, But, if you're comfortable on the bike, avoid excessive caffeine and heavy meals, take breaks, and stay hydrated there should be no reason you can't double your original 300 mile estimate.

    Good luck! :thumb
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  17. 2aRover

    2aRover Been here awhile

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    Agree with those who suggest a practice day.

    Doing high miles also requires that you like to ride, and that you like to ride your specific bike. I love my old Land Rover and make interstate trips in it frequently. It is NOT the quintessential hgh-speed traveler, but I love it, love driving it, and enjoy talking to people at fuel stops. My Tiger is much better at high-speed touring, but loving to ride it makes any discomfort (minor:evil )worthwhile. Get off hourly, stand on the pegs, drag your metal toe covers on the pavement, and drink lots. Save sporty sections for the morning hours when you're fresh. Doing them when "velocitized" or at the end of the day can be a real trick.
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  18. sachiwilson

    sachiwilson Been here awhile

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    I've done two Iron Butt Association Saddlesore certified rides on a Honda 599 with no fairing, so you should be able to do nice long days on your bike too.

    I wrote up this page for my friends to use when they prepared for upcoming rides - feel free to use it. I link to the Iron Butt Association's Archive of Wisdom, too, so you'll get all the good dope at once. :nod
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  19. ecujim

    ecujim Adventurer

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  20. NJ Moto

    NJ Moto Long timer

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