Riders with disabilities

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Geology Rocks, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. Geology Rocks

    Geology Rocks Believes in Bigfoot

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Out looking for Bigfoot
    Just curious if there are any other riders on here with disabilities? Have you had to make any modifcations to your bike? Do you have a handicapped plate for your bike? If it was a newer injury did you notice any specific difficulties in riding from before to after the injury?

    I cant give up riding and will do what I need to do in order to ride.

    I hope others still get out and ride!
    #1
  2. Offcenter

    Offcenter On The Road Again!

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2012
    Oddometer:
    291
    Location:
    Northern New Jersey
    #2
  3. Valker

    Valker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2003
    Oddometer:
    358
    Location:
    Pampa, Texas
    My son lost his left foot about 7 years ago. He rode a LOT before and has ridden tens of thousands miles since. He or I would be happy to correspond about any issues.
    #3
  4. the_sandman_454

    the_sandman_454 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Oddometer:
    430
    Location:
    Coleman, Michigan
    A friend of mine whose left arm is paralyzed was able to modify the controls on a couple of bikes to work righty only with significant success.

    I'm sure you can find a combination of modifications to allow you to do it. Worst case, such as if you can't balance the bike when stopped, there's always a hack, trike, or that funky Can-Am reverse trike thingy.
    #4
  5. Offcenter

    Offcenter On The Road Again!

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2012
    Oddometer:
    291
    Location:
    Northern New Jersey
    When you come up against those negative people, ignore 'em.
    If you can't ignore 'em, show 'em the video!!

    .....and let us know how you make out, pics of what modifications you
    come up with, etc. !!!!!
    #5
  6. HappyRiding

    HappyRiding Luddite

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,737
    Location:
    Purgatory
    I had a spinal injury two years ago that effected my left leg. I had little feeling in my left foot, no use of my calf muscles and partial loss of my thigh muscles. I was and still am not able to push off of my toes when I walk or push the bike upright off of the sidestand.

    I started riding my small DS bike first until I got where I could find the shifter without looking and then started riding the WeeStrom. I can only tippy toe the Wee so I have a few issues that wouldn't exist if I could flat foot it. One of the biggest challenges was figuring out how to mount and dismount since I couldn't stand on my left leg and pivot. Once I started mounting from the "wrong" side, I was a new woman. Still, I have to be extremely careful about where I park. If it is leaning to far onto the sidestand, I don't have the umph to push it upright. I am pretty slick about using my body weight to tip the bike to the right until my right foot finds the ground most of the time. I have had to solicit help several times when I had "parking issues" but that is usually when I am riding with someone who stops somewhere that I wouldn't if solo.

    My bike was good therapy for me mentally and physically. It gave me real goals. Riding my bike I am not that "woman with a limp." I was a solid rider before and I am a solid rider now. I haven't really made any modifications to the bike although having a lower and lighter bike would have been nice on many occasions. The PITA thing that persists is not being able to "feel" neutral when I shift. Luckily, there is an idiot light on the bike to tell me when I have found neutral.

    After two years, I am finally starting to see a little progress to my nerves healing. I can tell hot from cold on a part of my foot and my calf muscle is beginning to fire again. I have hopes of all being good as new some day but for now I am happy to have what I have.

    Where there is a will, there's a way.:thumb

    Sara
    #6
  7. GHO100

    GHO100 Crazy George

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,106
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    I'll just leave this one here:

    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/54484262?badge=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/54484262">HEAL Clothing Doug Henry GoPro Video</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/dbstudios">DB Studios</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>
    #7
  8. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    6,630
    Location:
    the hills
    We have a customer who was paralyzed from mid chest in a scuba diving accident. He's one insistent headstrong mofo. Rides a custom made small block Chevy powered trike. We've been sorting out the issues (someone else built it) for the past few months. It's actually a nice ride.

    It started with him bringing it in so we could lower it a bit so he could get on/off unassisted. Then installing a fuel tank,trying to fix a barely operating rear brake. Now it's back for some fixes from a hit and run that left him with a broken femur. Tough fucker he is.
    #8
  9. LngRidr

    LngRidr Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    181
    Location:
    Colbert, GA
    #9
  10. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    9,330
    Location:
    Delaware Ohio
    Years back when I was working at a dealership we had a kid who rode a rough looking Virago 750 circa 82, who had no right arm (gone from the shoulder). He did it no problem, clutch, brake, throttle on the left side.. There is currently a one armed flattracker racing AMA Pro-Am races.

    We also did an 89 Gold Wing (reverse proven after a year on the market) set up with a side car using integrated braking and hand shifter (he got impatient, I wanted a pnumatic or electric selenoid shifter) for a T6 paraplegic. I set up the single hand lever braking for the three calipers, he had the sidecar builder set up brackets in the sidecar to hold his broken down wheel chair. He could pull himself up on the seat, the would pop the wheels off the light weight chair, tucking them in the sidecar, then collapse the chair and fit it in the car too. The tonneau cover snapped down over the sidecar seat area and off he went. Rode all over the country with that rig.

    I also saw a sweet shifter set up a Gold Wing rider did using his on-board compressor. He pressurized the engine guard tubing, had the compressor set up to switch on and off at given pressures. He then had a pneumatic/electric shifter set up that operated off the clutch disengagement switch. He had a dual pole dual throw switch (I think that's the right designation) that would work the upshift when flipped up and downshift when flipped down. It was seriously trick. I just wish I'd have taken a closer look when I had the chance. Of course there are now kits used by chopper guys who want to do away with cables and levers.

    Just some of what I've seen and helped with to let people know it is out there.
    #10
  11. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    9,330
    Location:
    Delaware Ohio
    #11
  12. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    6,630
    Location:
    the hills
    This is Earl "Lefty" Roloff. A riding friend of the old man. Dad said" the fucker was faster with one arm dammit!" Forgive the quality it's a photo of a photo.


    [​IMG]
    #12
  13. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,545
    Location:
    The Badlands (of NJ)
    I was just watching the GlobeRiders' video on R1200GS.

    One of the sections was on Mike Paull's GS, equipped with an EZS sidecar. Despite missing a leg, Mike participates in (and, I believe, guides) many exotic adventure tours.

    Mike's bio from their site.
    #13
  14. RVDan

    RVDan Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,746
    Location:
    Abbotsford British Columbia Canada
    I rode with a damaged right knee for a long time. I walked with a cane, it was excruciatingly painful to put weight on the knee while bent, straight leg it wasn't so bad.

    Riding was easy, I did adjust the rear brake pedal a bit and I wore short boots so I could move my ankle to push the brake instead of moving my whole leg like I used to, but it was less painfull to ride than it was to push the brake pedal in the car. Swinging the leg over took a bit of time to figure out an elegant way to get on, once figured it was no worse than how I would fall into the car and roll out of it.

    The worst part is stowing the cane. I used an adjustable aluminum cane so I could collapse it and just layed it across the bars, the brake line and cables held it reasonably tight against the windshield, it never went anywhere.

    Yes I had a handicap placard that I hung off the bar end. I got questioned a lot about it, especially on good days that I went out without the cane.

    Thankfully I've healed enough that the doctor would no longer sign the form letting me use the handicap spots :lol3
    #14
  15. Chris618

    Chris618 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    842
    Location:
    Troy, NY
    I believe Mike Martiri of GMD Computrack NY fabbed up an electronic kickstand with wheels on both sides of the bike that would deploy with a button when a rider would come to a stop. I am not sure if the rider was paralyzed or an amputee.
    #15