Riding a bike is as dangerous as fighting a war

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by chasssmash, Jun 26, 2013.

  1. glasswave

    glasswave Been here awhile

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    No, I am not a troll. I was just pointing out that calling statistics useless lies, pretending they don't exist or rationalizing that they don't apply to oneself is rather callow.

    I never stated that riders cannot manage (I don't think control is a good word here) the risks associated with motorcycling and behave in ways that lessen them. In fact, I state quite the opposite. "I am happy to have [statistical information], because it allows me to assess the risks and act in ways to eliminate or minimize them." Also, in my first post I actually enumerate several risk reduction strategies.

    It seems as if you did not even read my post completely before replying to it.

    Again, I never indicated that it was mere superstition that motos attract thrill seekers. OTH, to imply that only the foolish end up in serious accidents and thus become part of accident statistics is simply naive. Any review of face plant, motorcycle accident reporting or making a serious investigation into the stats will reveal that it is quite common for experienced, well trained motorcyclists to be seriously injured of killed in accidents that involve no fault of their own.

    While it's good to hear that you ride carefully, your anecdotal story has nothing to do with what is plainly evident in the statistics and your insinuation that because you ride carefully, only others risk serious accident is pretending to be oblivious of the facts.

    This is very true, although I hope you are not implying that I am not the one who stated that I bought a convertible to reduce my exposure to the risks of motorcycling, I am not. That said, any review of accident injury stats will reveal that the likelihood of serious injury or death in and accident is much lower for seat belted drivers in modern cars than it is for motorbikers.

    And 'how do you know this?', probably because you read it in an article quoting a statistical study.

    I engage in many "risky" activities (whitewater kayaking, backcountry skiing, mountaineering, motorbiking in developing countries...etc.), but I certainly don't ignore the risks of such activities or pretend that the risks/statistics don't apply to me. To do so would be simply ignorant.

    To be purposely nescient does nothing to improve the quality of one's life.
    #61
  2. Paebr332

    Paebr332 Good news everyone!

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    Bravo in the use of nescient. I thought I was the only person on the interwebs who used it.
    #62
  3. MacNoob

    MacNoob piney fresh

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    I had to look it up. Hopefully I can remember it when necessary.
    #63
  4. glasswave

    glasswave Been here awhile

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    I've always had an impulse to become somewhat of a sesquepedilian when in retort to a critical reply. :lol3:lol3
    #64
  5. duck

    duck Banned

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    Personally, I don't get why some people have an aversion to riding at night. Not that I've researched it but are there any (damned) statistics that show riding at night as being riskier?

    I think riding at night is awesome and really enjoy it.

    MY opinions on the risks of riding at night:

    1) Deer and other critters seem to be more likely to be willing to commit vehicular suicide at night. This is the thing I worry about most riding at night.

    2) Other vehicles. I think, if you have decent headlight/aux lighting, that it's less likely to get SMIDSY'd by a cager. That said, it is probably more likely that other road users may have some alcohol in their bloodstream.

    3) Have good lighting and don't outride it. I try to get as much light as I can as far and wide down the road as possible to mitigate risk. (Without blinding oncoming road users or the mirrors of the guy in front of you.)
    #65
  6. Pantah

    Pantah PJ Fan from Boston

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    Actually you are a troll, and nobody wants to read your entire posts. You should take a course in efficient writing and learn how to curb your arrogance...:deal
    #66
  7. jordan325ic

    jordan325ic Been here awhile

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    Without reading the book or it's sources.

    There is a vast number of support personnel in Afghanistan that are not exposed to combat. "Fighting in Afghanistan" gives most people the impression of soldiers on patrol, which is far more dangerous than being a non-combat support personnel.

    A large majority of the American motorcycle population use motorcycles only to engage in more risky activities (bar hopping or thrill seeking). This skews this death-ratio upwards from what this more risk-adverse (mature adventure riding) population experiences.

    I have no doubt that the statistics are mathematically accurate, but they do not give an accurate depiction of reality.



    My motorcycles are my only form of transportation. I am a mature, conservative adult rider with no accidents or speeding tickets on a bike, but that doesn't mean I'll live forever. If I am tired, if I am late for work, if it is raining, if I am angry, if it's 105 degrees outside, if I had a (single) beer after work, if it's 30 degrees outside, I will be getting on the bike and riding because that is what I love to do. The preservation of life is not the primary goal of living. I accept that death will catch up to me no matter what I do. How do you want to die?
    #67
  8. glasswave

    glasswave Been here awhile

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    Just saying something does not make it so. If you don't want to read my posts then don't.
    #68
  9. BCKRider

    BCKRider Been here awhile

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    I gave up night riding several years ago, and frankly would like to give up night driving which I find discomfiting. On the bike, I found it much harder to maintain my intended line, to tell whether the change of pavement ahead was a patch or a pothole. Old vision (I'm now 66) is not as good as younger vision - even corrected by good glasses. And, depending on where you ride, there is also the possibility of more deer or drunks.

    Certainly not telling anyone they shouldn't ride at night - but observe how you feel. When the danger vs pleasure quotient tilted the wrong way, I quit that part of riding.
    #69
  10. toy4fun

    toy4fun GET out of the way

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    ok guys i read this blog so i don't have to look up words, oh yea to look at the fantastic pictures also.:lol3
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  11. glasswave

    glasswave Been here awhile

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    At least one study that I have read (the Hurt report which is very old) reports darkness being corollary to increased accident risk. I don't recall what the MAIDS report had to say about it. Lighting systems, brakes etc are much better now, so maybe things have changed somewhat.
    #71
  12. Auto-X Fil

    Auto-X Fil Been here awhile

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    People have a lot of problem with the phrase,

    "Motorcycles are extremely dangerous."

    Perhaps a statement more reflective of the state of things would be,

    "Motorcycles are extremely unforgiving."
    #72
  13. Rango

    Rango Phaneropter

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    Living is extremely dangerous. No one has ever survived so far!
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  14. Aj Mick

    Aj Mick Been here awhile

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    I've yet to come across a micronort. They sound a bit scary. Do they eat people, or just kill for fun.
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  15. Aj Mick

    Aj Mick Been here awhile

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    Nicely put.

    I have been riding to get around since 1969, and have seldom owned a car.

    I got a a couple of speeding tickets in the early seventies. In early 1976 I was knocked off my bike by a fast moving car as the driver pulled in after overtaking the car behind me.... "I didn't see you," he said. His fault, but had I been more aware and better positioned on the road i could probably have avoided the accident.

    Since then the post above could equally apply to me, and sums up my point of view.
    #75
  16. chasssmash

    chasssmash Banned

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    If only you could be sure you died in a bad crash:-)

    I'm the same as you in so far as I.ride daily and it's basically my main means of transportation. Still it's nice to live.in reality and know the real risks of riding.

    It won't stop me- I just don't like deluding myself
    #76
  17. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

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    In an urban area, I would have agree with that except for make it a little less.....

    what credible source are we talking about?
    #77
  18. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

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    and what if you're fighting in Afghanistan on a motorcycle?

    :scratch
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  19. Dastard

    Dastard Just another guy

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    Didn't read through the whole thread, but there have been periods of time that more military members were killed on motorcycles than were killed in combat in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Granted, in the same time frame, more military members were killed in non-combat situations than combat situations (vehicle rollovers, heart attack etc)

    D
    #79
  20. Mat

    Mat Long timer

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    I do like to read his posts, they are usually quite well thought out and offer an interesting perspective (which I agree with sometimes, and sometimes not).


    As an aside, relevant to the discussion, what is defined as "fighting in Afghanistan"? Just being there or actually fighting with guns blazing, being shot at? Or just being in Afghanistan? As a Western soldier, afghan soldier, Taliban, suicide bomber, civilian, who exactly? They all have vastly different mortality rates.

    It is a dumb comparison, if you ask me. Then again Dakez already said what had to be said a few pages ago :freaky
    #80