Riding at night. In the rain.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Marvey, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. olebiker

    olebiker Old buzzard bait

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    Thank God they changed that forecast. I dunno if they messed the numbers up or what. Still gonna be cold but more like what we are used to minus 23C.
    We used to heat the battery up cold batteries have little juice.
    #81
  2. matkal

    matkal Assault Commuter

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    Rode home tonight in possibly the worst conditions for keeping you face shield clean: Wet roads, lots of mist kicked up from other vehicles, not much rain to wash it off. The Raincoat performed beyond my expectations! Even at low speeds in mist it kept my FS clear. Wow! I purposly got behind the most misting trucks I could find, still worked. At high speeds(70-80mph), behind a SUV, FS stayed clear. This stuff is the shizz.

    Can't wait to try it in a downpour!

    My only question: How long does a packet last after it's been opened?
    I treated my FS and my wind screen and used less than half of the sample.
    #82
  3. themenz

    themenz Long timer

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    Matkal, first thank you for the great review! May I post that on my website?

    If you fold and paper clip the opening, Raincoat should last for 5 months or more. I have a couple of pouches that have been opened almost 7 months and they are still soft.

    I would squeeze the remaining product towards the bottom. Then tightly fold the opening a couple of times, then use a paper clip to hold the folds closed.
    #83
  4. matkal

    matkal Assault Commuter

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    Post away! :deal

    Thanks for the tip.
    #84
  5. matkal

    matkal Assault Commuter

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    No down pour tonight, just light rain.
    If you ride in the rain, get some of this stuff :bigok:
    You won't be disappointed.
    #85
  6. matkal

    matkal Assault Commuter

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    No down pour tonight, just light rain.
    If you ride in the rain, get some of this stuff :thumbup
    You won't be disappointed.
    #86
  7. beemer boy

    beemer boy Oh no, he's gone Asian

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    Lemon pledge works very well. Cheap, and available everywhere. It is used by bush pilots in Alaska to keep the rain off of aircraft plastic windshields. With any wind at all the water just flies off as the surface is now waxed. I use it here in Thailand as well. The trouble I have here is light rain, where cars I am following throw up a light combination of dirt and rain that make for smeary visors. I always carry water, and stop once in a while to clean it pouring water on it. If you just rub it with your glove while underway, in essence you are sandpapering your visor, with expected results.....
    I also agree with some of the posters here. If you are riding at night in the the rain, your odds of an accident go WAY
    up. I know, because I live in a tropical country ( endless rain ). And when though bad planning I ended up riding at night,
    I also ended up with a lot of close close calls. I ended up one time riding into Phnom Penh at night in heavy rain, on a two lane road with heavy local traffic. I was amazed that I made it alive..........
    #87
  8. Wreckchecker

    Wreckchecker Ungeneer to broked stuff.

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    I ride in the night & rain to get home from work regularly. With the reflectors on my 'Stitch and helmet, I'm lit up like Las Vegas, though.

    But at night,
    In the rain
    With a monsoon season, no less,
    With Thai roads that have few lights,
    With Thai traffic?



    You win!

    btdt & :eek1
    #88
  9. Moving Pictures

    Moving Pictures Sir Loin of Biff

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    That, actually, is why I have a bicycle-oriented water-bottle holder on my left, right on the crashbars (as per the pic below.) I use that to wash crap off my visor. Handy during bug season when some particularly large and particularly juicy insect meets its demise somewhere just above where my left eye is supposed to look.

    [​IMG]
    #89
  10. wibby

    wibby BrotherFromAnotherMother

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    Also works quite well for tailgaters
    #90
  11. matkal

    matkal Assault Commuter

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    Good idea!
    #91
  12. jimrockford

    jimrockford Banned

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    As a evening year-round commuter in a region in which it rains a bunch,
    I encountered two problems with rain at night.

    One, the fog. I got a helmet/shield with one of those little snorkel
    things that fit over nose and mouth. That is effective when it fits
    correctly. Except at stoplights. Another bonus was a double-layer
    face shield. I think they were for snowmobile riders because this
    one scratched too easily and didn't last long. I hear they also make
    heated shields for snowmobile folks.

    But none of that really mattered when it was raining and oncoming
    cars' headlights hit the wet road. That was big problem number two.
    In that case, I couldn't see squat. And that was even if it had
    stopped raining and my faceshield was dry and clear. If the
    road was still wet, the oncoming lights killed my sight of the
    road. Maybe it is something peculiar to people in their
    mid-forties? Anyway, I resorted to mounting a flat beamed fog lamp.
    That helped quite a bit. My fear was hitting a piece of firewood. Never
    saw one. More likely was a deer carcass. Saw those. Never hit one.
    #92