Riding up the loading ramp

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by alvincullumyork, Feb 3, 2014.

  1. jmq3rd

    jmq3rd .

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    I do a little of both. I only had an issue riding up once, on a DR650 with mud covered tires. Back wheel slid of the side halfway up. If tires and ramp are both dry, and the ramp is already in place when I pull up to the truck, I ride it up. If I have to get off the bike to get the ramp out, I push it up. At my house I can get the tailgate less than a foot off the ground. I just bounce the front wheel up with the dirt bike, and use 1/2 a folding ramp for the street bike.

    I do have 2 fail stories, in addition to my getoff -

    1 - My brother rode his V-Strom into the back of his F150 for several years (not that often though). First time into his new Tundra, he didn't get it stopped quick enough and broke the back window (which is one of the fancy roll-down ones).

    2 - When I was younger my father used to stop at the car wash on the way home from dirt riding. We would jacknife the trailer, unload the one from the bed of the truck, then wash the bikes on the trailer, then the unloaded bike, then jacknife the trailer again and load up. He rode it up one and only one time at the carwash. Wet wooden ramp + soapy wet tires are not a good combo.


    When pushing the bike up (or unloading), I put it in gear, engine off. Release the clutch halfway up and then move into the bed (or down to the ground), pull the clutch back in, and finish. No step needed. Then again, I'm kind of a big boy, so balancing a Kawasaki Versys with one hand while climbing into a truck isn't that big of a deal. If you only weigh 150lbs, it might not be quite as easy.
    #21
  2. k-moe

    k-moe Long timer

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    :nod
    Every one of those bikes would have cleared if nobody was sitting on them.

    Quick tip: Park with the nose of your truck in the street, and use the slope of the driveway skirt to your advantage. In most cases you'll lose a foot of height at the truck bed, and reduce the ramp angle.

    Better tip: Buy a trailer
    #22
  3. mongox

    mongox ARRRRGH!!!

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    Trailer
    #23
  4. crazyjeeper

    crazyjeeper Been here awhile

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    I usually ride them up. I use a tri-fold ATV ramp that is nearly as wide as the tailgate. It is a bit short though so I have to put the back wheels of the pickup in the gutter to lessen the height. I tried the whole wood plank thing and it was probably the scariest thing I've ever done so I'll stick with my big wide ramp.
    #24
  5. gravityisnotmyfriend

    gravityisnotmyfriend Long timer

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    You could do like this guy. If you keep it on one wheel, you wont bottom out. It'd take a bit more speed for a truck bed, though!

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/E0BSoV_Kltg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    #25
  6. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    Well may be not my "Worst" but I bumper carry anyway.:evil

    The few times that I have needed to load it in the truck I just picked it up a wheel at a time with a friend 420 lbs /2/2. Not so hard.

    awesome vid:clap
    #26
  7. Ceemack

    Ceemack Adventurer

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    Agreed...the driveway is your friend. The angle between the ramp and the bed won't be as steep.
    #27
  8. Offcamber

    Offcamber Long timer

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    When I have to do it I find a hill I can back the truck up to and load the bike as level as possible....One ramp for the bike one ramp for me to walk along side it....
    #28
  9. Pantah

    Pantah PJ Fan from Boston

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    Good thread with lots of tips. I've always towed a trailer, which is the easiest solution (particularly with a ramp door). But recently I bought a F150 and hauled a couple bikes to my place in AZ. I was wondering how I was going to get the Ducati out by myself. I have an 8 foot aluminum folding ramp that is 18 inches wide. It's a long step off the tailgate too, so I would need something for a step.

    It turned out no biggie using the slope of the driveway with the rear wheels in the gutter. Probably would need help re-loading, though. I have a 300lb dual sport that I'd like to try riding it up, but I could probably roll it up myself if I can find a slope to use.

    I'd buy another trailer, but then I'd have to store it somewhere. Hopefully the ramp will suffice.
    #29
  10. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Just like he said. As level as possible and 2 ramps. Tho I can ride my quad on and off with never a problem, just the thought of doing it on my F650GS shrinks my nads!:eek1
    #30
  11. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    I drilled a hole in the middle of my ramp and one in my tailgate. I stick a bolt thru for a pin.
    #31
  12. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    They make arched ramps so the bike is at less of an angle at the top.
    #32
  13. scottrnelson

    scottrnelson Team Orange

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    I used to ride motocross bikes up a 10" wide 8-foot ramp into an old F-150. Then one time I went to do that and the bottom of the ramp shifted over so that the front wheel made it up, but the rear was still on the ground. I got off of the bike without dropping it, rolled the front wheel back off of the tailgate onto the ground, and pushed bikes in from then on.

    I rode a Ducati Monster M900 up that ramp a few times too. After once feeling the urge to put a foot down when half-way up I quit doing that too. I just powered into the truck bed rather than dropping the bike, but it was clear that I was taking a chance doing that.

    A few months ago I had a flat rear tire on my big KTM and needed to get it up a ramp and into the back of the truck belonging to the local shop to go get it fixed. It's heavier and more awkward than any other bike I've owned, so I was having a tricky time powering it up the ramp while standing to the side of it. After the ramp shot out the back once, we tied the end of the ramp to the bumper and I let the guy from the shop get it in there. That was another case of the front wheel ending up on the tailgate.

    It seems to be a lot easier to get a 250 pound MX bike up a ramp than a 500 pound adventure bike.
    #33
  14. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    there was a time many years ago when I would ride a bike up a ramp into a trailer or truck

    no more, I have learned from witnessing the failure of others that it is not a good idea
    #34
  15. Hawk62cj5

    Hawk62cj5 2 Cheap 4 a KLR

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    I ride mine up and in to the back of the truck or van ,I have a full width 6.5 long ramp with grip tape on the rungs wand secured to the vehicle with chains. Never no problems .
    #35
  16. gravityisnotmyfriend

    gravityisnotmyfriend Long timer

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    Well I know that.

    You know that.

    The poor saps in that video clearly don't.

    My previous house had a nice steep ditch next to the road. If you put the back wheels of a pickup at the bottom, the tailgate just about touches the ground. I could drive little bikes on to a truck with it, but it'd take a 3' ramp for heavier bikes.

    My current house has a nice steep bank next to the road. It works just as well. The downside is that you have to park your truck sideways on a public road to load anything.
    #36
  17. Onederer

    Onederer Crunch Nugget

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    Some people like to make things harder than they really are.

    The guy on the custom bike at 1:00 jacked his arm up pretty bad.

    This doesn't work for most people either:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=82kZ94fskaY
    #37
  18. jeffjones

    jeffjones "offroad shit"

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    http://www.readyramp.com/ got one of these back in 08'ish...
    best money ever spent @ dealer cost prices anyways...

    loaded everything with it up to a goldwing. doubles as bed extender is bonus.
    depending on what truck I have i'd just use slope of driveway or any dry ditch/hill around to make it the easiest possible slope.

    dirtbikes get pushed up the ramp till the front wheel is in the bed a few feet then I step up on tailgate and roll it in the rest of the way.

    heavy bikes I usually bring another cheap steel harbor freight ramp and use it to walk up while using bike power to bring it up readyramp
    #38
  19. Montague

    Montague UDF Adventurer

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    Geez, that is about the dumbest thing I have ever seen filmed. What did he actually think would happen when he put it in gear and twisted?:eek1

    PS. I note the dog took off just before the fun began, probably the highest IQ of the bunch!
    #39
  20. steveWFL

    steveWFL Long timer

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    I just ride right up, no matter my dirt street or ADV bikes.



    [​IMG]
    #40