Riding up the loading ramp

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by alvincullumyork, Feb 3, 2014.

  1. Velocibiker

    Velocibiker Adventure Antagonist

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    To alleviate my fear of riding on/up a ramp, I just laid the ramp (2x10 wood board with those bolt on aluminum bits) flat on the ground and rode over it a few times. Once my confidence was there, it was really easy since the only difference was a bit of an angle. I had/have ridden over & through much narrower and higher single track than that board. Just needed to convince my brain it was no worse. Stand up. Feet on pegs and just tractor it up & in. Never did acquire that skill set of letting a bike roll backwards while I was still on it. Always ended up walking it out of the truck or trailer.
    #41
  2. Mesjr

    Mesjr Been here awhile

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    I used to ride my dirt bikes in the truck on a 8-10 inch wide arked ramp all the time, never had a incident . Had a buell I took to dealer for service and when I went to pick it up I already had the ramp in place , guy said give him a min to get a couple guys to help load it , I looked at him and said I don't need help . Hopped on and rode it in the truck 4x4 ford diesel . Grabbed the straps ands inched it down without ever getting off . The look on that guys face was priceless . I thought nothing of it at the time. Took a few years off riding and wouldn't do it now , I don't ride enough . I rode almost every weekend and sometimes after work , was really comfortable on a bike .
    #42
  3. gravityisnotmyfriend

    gravityisnotmyfriend Long timer

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    That guy at 1:00? His arms were fine. He got a classic case of "knocked da fuck out".

    Check out the guy on the right at 10 seconds in. Same thing:

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Kw1xcuygxGE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    #43
  4. jeffjones

    jeffjones "offroad shit"

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    then you need a trailer to haul the ramp with you?:rofl

    That thing is huge.. does it fold up more then just the obvious middle? makes bike loading easy I bet, but size would be an issue unless its just one bike in the back..

    maybe there is 3 sections to it??? what brand/model???
    #44
  5. willis 2000

    willis 2000 neo-quixote

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    i saw a guy coast a pursang down a skinny aluminum ramp, stop, fold out the kickstarter, ride off on one wheel without a dab
    if ya wheelie into the bed, there won't be a clearance problem
    #45
  6. Tuna Helper

    Tuna Helper Rawrr!

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    Ramp up onto the trailer, then ramp from the trailer to the bed.

    I always either push it up if I have to, or walk alongside in first gear if possible. I've only had one incident, I was unloading from a trailer and using some HF ramps. The ramp was upside down so the flanges would act as a guide and hopefully keep the wheels from rolling or sliding off. Only they didn't. Just about when both wheels were on the ramp I let go of the brake to let gravity do it's thing, and halfway down the front wheel rolled over the lip and off the ramp. Not so much of a big deal, it was about a foot off the ground and I kept the bike upright, but the ramp was taco'd.

    I've backed the truck up to a ditch (a good ditch and the tailgate will be just about level) and rolled them in and out, I've pulled the tailgate off and used it for a ramp. (prepare for paint damage) When I bought my Buell the guy had it loaded in the back of his truck, then I backed mine up to his and we rolled from one to the other.

    Ir you could find a hill and a ramp.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1C8CdWrkIQ
    #46
  7. GordoS

    GordoS Pawn in game of life

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    Risk management as the Air Force calls it. The consequences of having my 1200 GS,or even my 450 XCW, fall if I were riding it up a ramp trumps any convenience of riding it up.

    I have both a single skinny ramp I bought as my first ramp because it was all the store had, and later got a ramp that is full width of the truck bed. There is room to walk beside the bike with the large ramp. Even then, I have ended up with a trailer because it is just easier to maneuver bikes around when you can step on and off the trailer.
    #47
  8. jeffjones

    jeffjones "offroad shit"

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    by risk management standards you shouldn't even be riding the motorcycles at all.
    #48
  9. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    I wiped out once doing that. I was riding an XL250 up a 6" ramp, and went too fast. I got on the brakes once in the truck, but wet tires and bedliners don't go well together. Ended up laying the bike down, with my shin on the sharp peg, giving me a 2" gash to the bone. I still have a nice scar to prove it.

    The best one I watched was a seasoned logger with a chain saw strapped to the back of his XR600. Just as I slowed to ask if he needed help, he gives the bike a little throttle, and it coasted nicely up the narrow ramp as he walked beside the truck with one hand on the seat, the bike stalling just as it came to the front of the truck bed. He looked at me like "what would I need help for?" You could tell this was his daily routine. :brow
    #49
  10. achtung3

    achtung3 Long timer

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    Looking into the barrel of a gun. Never a good idea.:huh
    #50
  11. Sp4rks

    Sp4rks Been here awhile

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    Bike is 220lbs(if that) with a full tank of gas ready to ride. I push it up one of those wide ramps from Harbor Freight.
    #51
  12. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    220 LBs you don't need a ramp.:lol3
    #52
  13. dwayne

    dwayne Silly Adventurer

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    We often load our bikes on frozen lakes, when not riding we wrap the wheels with carpet/heavy duty canvas liners to prevent dulling the screws we use when ice racing, they look a little like tire warmers. A set of tires runs $800 and the truck box would dull the screws without liners and the screws would destroy the truck bed. There is NO traction for the tires and very little for boots, even the bed of the truck is slippery. Surprisingly, despite effectively turning our wheels into chainsaws then riding them on ice, most injuries occur loading the bikes.

    I mounted a cheap 1500 lb ATV winch to the front box rail on the truck and hook the cable to a foot peg. Slow, controlled loading made easy.
    #53
  14. toy4fun

    toy4fun GET out of the way

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    Please please please JACK UR TRUCK UP WAY HIGH its very usefull:evil
    #54
  15. BCOffRoad

    BCOffRoad Adventurer

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    I push my dirt bike up a dual ramp while walking beside it on the ramp. For larger bikes, under power in first gear, smaller bike get manhandled in. I always leave the bikes in gear when backing them out so I can drop the clutch if the front wheel starts sliding on the way down the ramp.

    I used to ride up the ramp. No problem after a ride when I was fully comfortable on the bike. Different story first thing in the morning with a cold bike, cold body, and pretty much no gear.

    I used to make my sister load her bike by herself all the time (in case I was ever incapacitated and she had to go get the truck, she would have practice). One time she loosened a strap too quickly and the bike fell, knocking her out of the bed of the truck, except for her leg that was pinned. Another time as she backed the bike down the 'ladder' type ramp the front tire started sliding (she didn't have it in gear) and she stepped through the ramp, bike fell on top of her, general bad scene (wish I had that on camera). Despite some pretty major scrapes and bruises, and a big dent in her shin, she was still up for the all day ride we had planned.
    #55
  16. Falconx84

    Falconx84 Lurker

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    If necessary, I trailer my bike... Built in ramp and only a couple feet off the ground. Very easy to do solo.


    I'm surprised no one mentioned (lack of) head room when loading into an enclosed truck like uhaul or similar.
    #56
  17. BossMaverick

    BossMaverick Been here awhile

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    Steep ditches will make almost any ramp useable. Even backing up to a curb or steep driveway is better than nothing.

    I've also found that small dealers or shops can be pretty good about letting you use their permanent style ramps as long as buy something now and again.

    IMHO, trailers are the easiest.
    #57
  18. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away

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    That's been our approach. Make it as straight and level as possible with adequate ramp width (or extra boards) for putting the foot down. The object is to get the bike up as easily and safely as possible, not demonstrate your riding/loading skills (or lack thereof).
    #58
  19. BossMaverick

    BossMaverick Been here awhile

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    Exactly. Even being able to do it right 97% of the time isn't good enough when you consider the cost of cosmetic parts and/or paint.
    #59
  20. Spaggy

    Spaggy Long timer

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    We used to use a steep ditch and the endgate from my old ford beater as a ramp.
    #60