Riding with cruisers.. I want one!!

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by damasovi, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. cycleman2

    cycleman2 Been here awhile

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    I second this, especially if you are going to do any 2 up.

    Shaft/belt or whatever final drives are a matter of personal choice. You really can't beat a shaft for low maintenance, and you did mention something about less than ideal roads. Belts don't like sand & gravel.
    #21
  2. BryonLewis

    BryonLewis Been here awhile

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    Started off for the first year on a v-star 650 custom, great bike I liked it a lot. Although with my size it was a little too underpowered to do two-up. I sold that and got my self a B-King. The B-King is a great bike (way too much power for anyone) and I found myself missing the cruiser style after 3 years I've kept the B-King and now added a VTX1800C to the stable for two-up riding. The VTX also has way more power than is ever needed.
    #22
  3. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    I like your style man! I am under 200 lbs with all the gear.
    I think the Vstar has like 31 hp vs 33 from the KLR and the vstar weight more, about 80-100 lbs, right? and confort.. ok I have not riden the v-star but have seen many people enjoy it, and I really enjoy the KLR up to hour 10 then it gets to be too much, but after 10 hours on the bike, is there a bike that let's you ride better? and I am thinking being fit goes a lot longer than been a couch potato (like me)

    Thanks for the info, I do appreciate it!

    Wow a BMW for around $6K? that would be nice, but the seat would be an issue? would have to check.

    I remember sitting on a 1800 vtx and it was not for me, to big, expensive and too heavy, it was wrong almost like a GSA...

    Thanks

    Damasovi
    #23
  4. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

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    Dont listen to anyone on here. Find what fits YOU, ride it and love it. I dont care what it is..... find what YOU like and ride it.

    A safe cruiser to get might something like a Shadow. Dead reliable, smallish and they still look fantastic. Then decide where you want to go from there.
    #24
  5. Noobie Doobie

    Noobie Doobie Born to Noob

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    I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the Triumph America/Speedmaster.

    I bought one new a couple of years ago for $7500, because it has many of the traits that you desire: not expensive to buy or maintain, fairly low curb weight of 550 pounds, one of the best handling cruisers available, chain drive (if that's considered desirable), 28 inch seat height, much more comfort than my BMW F650, it's not a Harley clone, and it has plenty of chrome!

    YMMV
    #25
  6. theloop

    theloop Been here awhile

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    Fly out to Michigan and bring 4 grand, and I will pick you up at the airport. You give me the 4 grand, and you can ride this back:D
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  7. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    The VTX1800 is just too big and heavy, and does not have such great performance. If you are going to ride on nothing but long straight roads with a high speed limit all day, it's fine (other than the mileage) None of the big cruisers make nearly as much power as you would think. Used to be the top of the cruiser displacement scale was 1500cc, and my Vulcan 750 would outrun them all. The stock Suzuki Intruder 800 would easily outrun the 1400. Bigger does not always mean faster, at least not enough to matter. If you want a performance cruiser, consider the Honda Valkyrie. It's big, but has a 1500cc SIX cylinder engine instead of a huge lumbering v-twin. It is basically a cruiser version of the Goldwing. The 1500 Goldwing btw is a LOT faster, more comfortable, and handles better than any of the mega cruisers. Actually check out the specs and 1/4 mile times on some cruisers. You will be surprised at how little difference size makes. One place size (and weight) do show up is in a parking lot, or around town. Those beasts are just non fun at all in slow speed maneuvers. And they are definitely not for dirt or gravel roads. And belt drives, as nice as they are on the street, do get torn up fairly quickly by gravel.


    I have sit on a cruiser (750cc) for over 1000 miles, only getting off a couple of times for a few minutes, without any real pain. I had a lot more gas stops, but I just pulled up to the pump, stuck my card in, and filled it up without getting off. I did have a riders backrest, which makes all the difference on long rides. You can also strap a duffle bag or sleeping bag to the passenger seat if riding solo for the same thing. Something for back support. On a cruiser, if your legs start to hurt after a while, switch to the passenger pegs for a change of position. That helps a lot, and is always something I do on long rides. I even left the passenger pegs on my XT225, which at my size is completely incapable of carrying a passenger, just so I could use them on longer road rides.

    Sadly the new breed of cruisers are just not as good as the older ones comfortwise. My Vulcan 750 is a 1985 design. Other great older cruisers are the twin shock Virago 750 and 1100 models, the Suzuki Intruder 800 and 1400 (despite it's displacement, the original 1400 is not a huge heavy bike like the VTX1800) and the Honda Shadow 1100 Spirit. The Honda VLX600 is also very comfortable, though it may actually be too small. And as someone mentioned, the Triumph America and Speedmaster are decent cruisers. And while I don't like them as much as the older ones, I don't think I would have any issues with any of the modern cruisers up to 950cc. I always go for cruisers with higher bars. Some modern cruisers have what are called "beach" bars, which are too low and too wide to be comfortable. The whole concept of a cruiser as far as comfort goes is NOT having to lean forward. My Vulcan has the most comfortable bars of any cruiser I've ever had. Most cruisers have standard bars which can be changed, though that can involve changing hoses and cables and doing rewiring depending on how big the change is.

    I am not exactly a couch potato, though I do spend to much time sitting at my desk on the computer, but I am absolutely not one of those fitness types that go to the gym every day. And I have fairly severe arthritis and fibromyalgia, and am still comfortable on a cruiser or scooter.

    A cruiser should feel a lot like your scooter. You sit upright, feet in front like sitting in a chair, and you should be able to reach the bars while still having plenty of bend in your elbows. That's the basic cruiser riding position. From there it is just a matter of finding the one with the best fit for you.


    Honda VTX1800:
    1/4 mile 12.1 sec
    top speed 134 mph
    hp 95
    weight 774 lbs


    Kawasaki VN750:
    1/4 mile 13.2 sec
    top speed 120
    hp 68
    weight 483 lbs

    Within a second in the 1/4 mile, top speed over 100 does not matter with a cruiser, neither does actual hp, it's performance that counts. But look at the big difference. VTX1800 is almost 300 pounds heavier. With me on it, thats almost exactly HALF A TON

    Oh, and for those who like comfort, but not the cruiser look, check out the new Honda CTX700.
    #27
  8. Murphy Slaw

    Murphy Slaw Long timer

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    Kinda chilly up there, ain't it?

    :huh
    #28
  9. Tilter

    Tilter Been here awhile

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    I would look at:

    R1200r
    Moto guzzi griso
    Honda cb1100

    I think those bikes will give you what you want from a cruiser but also satisfy you I. Other ways as well.
    #29
  10. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    No doubt that is what the OP wants, but it would be dumb to post here asking for opinions, then not consider them.
    #30
  11. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    Comparing cc's doesn't tell you a lot about how much usable power a bike has. A XR650 or DR650 or DL650 or Versys is much different from a V-twin cruiser engine. People I know who have started on mid-size crusiers invariably end up trading for more displacement within a year or 2.

    I know you said you prefer to buy new, but given you really don't know how you'll like it, why not save some $ and buy used first to see how it suits you?

    The 900cc Vulcan, V-Star 950 or 1100, etc. are cheap and plentiful in the used market, and after few 1000 miles, you'll know more regarding how a cruiser works for you, and what size and characteristics suit best. The big depreciation was the original purchaser's loss, so if you move on, it shouldn't make a big hole in your bank account.
    #31
  12. SloMo228

    SloMo228 World Class Cheapass

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    I've always liked these:

    [​IMG]

    It's a cruiser with a sportbike engine, basically. They actually handle fairly well for a cruiser-type bike, too. It's not a huge touring bike, probably more comparable to a Sportster and other middleweight cruisers. I still wish Honda hadn't killed if off. :cry

    They've been out of production since '04 so you can only buy used, but that also means they're not too expensive either.
    #32
  13. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    these bike would also make a great bike, but now we are going in a sector that may be small (in physical size not hp) and it may end up been as much room as in the KLR. I would livo the CB1100 if I do that then I have to considere the FZ6, FZ8, & FZ1 that have good seat areas and a lot more power than I need for my 60-70 mph Sunday's ride 2 up, of course I then can forget the wife and ride faster solo!

    Thanks for this input, and I will continue to read and ride (if possible) all the bikes that are available to me,

    Cheers

    Damasovi
    #33
  14. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    I think a picture was intended to appear here. what was it Slomo?

    Damasovi
    #34
  15. fifthcircle

    fifthcircle Beer Knurd

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    I read the original post and skipped to here...


    I have had a V Star 650 (1999). Took it to Sturgis, and rode with my two buddies that had Shadow 750's. All were ok bikes. The v star was not bad on the highway, but after about 70, it was wrapping out pretty good. I did hold it at 85mph for the better part of an entire day (550mi) coming home from "THE RALLLY". Overall, it was a fun bike for around town, and on the shorter trips. If I were going for a cruiser to be on all day, I would get a bigger displacement bike...even with the added weight.

    The v Strom (650) was my next bike. I had it from 2004 to this year. Sold it about a month ago :cry It was a great all around bike. I have been on a ride or two with some cruiser guys, and was bored out of my mind trying to ride as slow as them. I have taken it to Colorado, and over 4x4 mountain passes, and then back home on the interstate all day. It could haul two people and light luggage for trips if needed, or even be muscled through wide singletrack. Best all around bike that is out there IMHO. There are nicer bikes for a lot more money, but the cost of a new strom and it's abilities are VERY hard to beat!!

    Let's just make sure you have one thing straight.
    The Strom is NOT a KLR cruiser! I always felt it was a sport bike crossed with a dirt bike. You will want to go faster and farther than the cruiser guys. You will see a dirt road, and think "what's up there?" and they cruiser guys will be wanting to head to the next bar. :lol3 I could get on my DL and burn a tank of gas before feeling like I could use a break (220mi), and I didn't need a long break. Any cruiser, I needed a break after 100mi.

    If you want a cruiser, get a cruiser. If you want an ADV bike, get the DL. If you want more dirt than street, keep the KLR. If all your friends are riding cruisers, maybe get a cruiser.... It is usually more fun to ride what your friends are riding. (I got a DL and made new friends :deal:lol3)
    #35
  16. PNWRR

    PNWRR not fragile

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    No mention of Victory Motorcycles? They are big, solid bikes but the weight feels nice and low. Used can be found for very reasonable cost.

    [​IMG]
    #36
  17. fifthcircle

    fifthcircle Beer Knurd

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    Good point. If I were wanting a cruiser, I would be looking at the Victory line. I like the looks of most of their bikes.

    Specifically, the Judge:
    [​IMG]
    #37
  18. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    Thanks for the input, I should say I love bikes in general, so I am thinking of having something totally different, but I am a cost analysis type of guy, and the smooth no vibes motor of the DL has been calling my name for several years now, life just gets in the way. This bike I have ridden as fast as 120's and two up is no issue (not at that speed, I do not want to do it).

    And yes I too have driving and got bored when trying to go as slow as the cruisers specially in the fun twisties or the speed bums they keep slowing to pass... I don't get it! lol!!

    I will continue to read guys! thank you

    Damasovi
    #38
  19. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    These two brands I did not include since I had forgotten they existed.

    The victories are much bigger bikes and more (a lot more) money brand new, but I have never really look at them since they are (or look) too heavy.

    The triumph is something different, all Bonnevilles are worth comparing them here... size, engine and enough mods possible to make it mine. So I will add this ones too to the list!

    Damasovi
    #39
  20. fifthcircle

    fifthcircle Beer Knurd

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    I've got it.

    Triumph Scrambler :deal

    Might not be a good two up touring machine though.

    The quiet buzz of the DL's twin is really nice on a long day! There really is something to be said about riding a quiet smooth bike. There is also something about a less than quiet bike, and smashing it through the gears. :D

    I think you need to make a list of pro's and con's for each bike on what you are going to be doing with it. You will have to compromise somewhere, and you need to figure out exactly where you are willing to compromise. I did this when I got the strom. This time, when I sold my strom, I went the opposite way and bought on lust. :wink:
    #40