Riding with cruisers.. I want one!!

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by damasovi, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    at one point I tough Mexico was the place for small cc bikes, but as I research, small here means 125 and under, so in the BIG 250 cc class there isn't much. From Honda there is the twister, a nice standard 6 speed bike, cool one, the Rebel is gone! and replace with the 125 cc V MEN.

    Suzuki just introduce the INAZUMA = GW250, and it is the only 250 standard or cruiser they offer.

    Yamaha... has the YBR 250, also a standard the natural rival to the Honda Twister and yamaha GW250. And also offers the Vstar 250

    Kawasaki mmm nothing

    And there are the million and one brands from ChiMex (China+Mexico) but those are not even worth mentioning.

    Too bad the TU is not available that is a sleek, cool looking bike!

    Damasovi
    #81
  2. ZZ-R Rider

    ZZ-R Rider Captain Fantastic

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    Wow, the Honda Twister 250 looks almost identical to the handful of Brazilian-spec Titan 150s we have as part of or MTP Training fleet!

    [​IMG]
    Twister

    and the Suzuki Inazuma 250 is pretty cool looking too!

    [​IMG]
    Inazuma

    Why wouldn't you consider either of these if they are available in Mexico? I am sure they are both excellent Bikes! I know from having Ridden the Titan 150, that it is a very comfortable, easy to ride motorcycle and can imagine that the Twister with the extra 100cc's is even better!
    #82
  3. MariusD

    MariusD Been here awhile

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    That new suzuki looks mighty interesting, but it's still not a true cruiser.

    I had an experience yesterday that keeps me standing by what I said earlier in this thread. A friend asked me to run his honda crf230 for a couple of weeks since he had barely run it lately. I reluctantly agreed, and actually got to appreciate the nimbleness and mpg of this bike. It really does get it done in the city. I rode it for 2 weeks and yesterday got back on my m50 800cc cruiser. I felt like I had to relearn to ride for a few minutes, but then I got into it and just cracked the throttle, HOLY COW! I don't remember this bike having this kind of "FU" power! I couldn't believe how fun and exilarating this bike is and yet still nimble! I got to work all amped up and remembered why I love this bike so much and also thought of this thread.

    I have 3 bikes at the house at the moment:

    Honda crf230
    M50
    Victory Hammer

    The only one that truely makes my day on my way to work is the M50.

    I still bielive that if you want a TRUE cruiser that is light and fun, the 800-950 class can't be beat. But If your definition of cruiser includes stuff like that suzuki in the post above, then there are a ton on other options, no doubt.
    #83
  4. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    Well the Twister is a great standard bike, that I think of as the Monster for the poor, how ever you get 23-26 hp, it has a 6 speed transmission and a great looking bike. It has the same motor as the Tornado but tune differently, and obviously it is smaller than the Tornado.

    The suzuki you have there is not the GW250 (Inazuma) you show the B-king a big, fast, heavy scale down from the Hayabusa, this is the Inazuma:
    [​IMG]


    Notice the single front disc (instead of the 2). and 2 instead of the 4 cylinders. Still a nice looking one.

    The twister was my next bike, in December 2011 I was going to buy one, but the scooter Beat appeal more at that time, if you go to the beginning of this thread you will notice that I mention 2 up as something I was interesting, now I have almost erase that from my list of likes... so the twister is on the plate again... Got to raise the money!

    Damasovi
    #84
  5. ZZ-R Rider

    ZZ-R Rider Captain Fantastic

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    My apologies on the previously posted, erroneous Inazuma pic ... am not familiar with that model as we don't have it here in Kanuckistan ... when I Googled "Inazuma" that was one of the pics that came up ...

    Look, if your interested in 250cc Cruisers, do one better ... Go look at a Suzuki Savage/S40 ... 250-size with a 650cc motor ... great Bikes and better in every respect ...
    #85
  6. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    I do not know where Kanuckistan is, I only found this:
    [​IMG]

    I do not remember why I rule out the s40, something... I do not remember, so next time up in San Diego I will look for it, maybe it was the price or something.

    Thanks

    Damasovi
    #86
  7. ZZ-R Rider

    ZZ-R Rider Captain Fantastic

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    LOL!!! Your map correctly shows Kanuckistan ... we share a continent with you and our American friends! :)
    #87
  8. BryonLewis

    BryonLewis Been here awhile

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    That is a little to small to be a B-King, that is the GSR600 also known as the Baby B-King. It has a detuned GSXR-600 engine with more midrange. The king has much larger rear tire and the side pods are huge.
    #88
  9. jdgretz

    jdgretz Looking for new places

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    I have the Honda Shadow 750 ADV Loaner bike.

    [​IMG]
    Loaded and Ready by jdgretz, on Flickr

    While primarily a Sport-Touring kind of guy (the Norge is my primary and favorite by a long shot) I found the shadow to be relatively comfortable over long distances. You can see the cross country trip here if you're bored. This bike is not fully forward controls but not standard either. There is a version of the 750 that has pretty much standard controls that would be pretty nice.

    [​IMG]

    I normally start looking for gas somewhere around 140/150 miles and have done as much as 169 miles on a tank of gas (huge pucker factor on that one) and put 3.9 gallons of gas in a 3.7 gallon tank.

    The bike is capable of running all day at 70-80MPH but is much happier at 65-70, and is respectable 2-up. I'd be tempted to put a back rest on it if I was doing a lot of 500 mile back to back days.

    Dirt?

    [​IMG]

    Yep, it can do it. (BTW, that is from inmate Frederic_Shifter's romp around the Western US last summer with the lovely Laurane).

    The newer Shadows have a shaft drive rather than a chain, and, at least with the older models, the bigger motors have hydraulic valves rather than the mechanical ones on the 2003.

    If you get up to the LA area for a couple of days, come by and borrow the bike. Put some miles on it and see what you think.

    jdg
    #89
  10. JerryH

    JerryH Long timer

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    I could make the typical comment, like "where's the bike?" but that is what everybody else would do, so I won't. Yes, these bikes can go almost anywhere, and I'm glad someone else also finds them comfortable over long distances. They are the perfect long distance touring bike for solo riders who don't want, or can't afford a full dress touring bike like a Goldwing, Harley Electra Glide, or BMW. (Or does BMW even make anything but SPORT touring bikes?
    #90
  11. jdgretz

    jdgretz Looking for new places

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    I will say that I completely understand highway pegs now. Definitely needed about that third 500 mile day to stretch the legs while in the saddle.

    jdg
    #91
  12. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    bump:evil
    #92
  13. JerryH

    JerryH Long timer

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    The Honda Twister and Suzuki Inazuma both look like sport bikes to me, but with somewhat more sane ergonomics. I am still waiting for the Suzuki GW250 to show up in the U.S., the local dealer said it might be a long wait. Right now I'm just enjoying riding my Vulcan 750 and Zuma 125. Both are very capable and comfortable machines. I think I may just ride the Vulcan until it wears out or blows up before I consider a new bike. It has been my favorite bike by far, so good I bought 2 brand new ones, and would buy a third if they still made them.
    #93
  14. Tom-Nor

    Tom-Nor Wannabe Adventurer

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    I have owned a V-Star1100 and i loved it.
    Its air-cooled wich looks nice but are not a good thing if your stuck in trafic.
    Lot of the chrome is plastic:waysad
    I see that you think that big cc = higher speed, wich is not the case for crusers.
    If i went at 75mph it feelt like my head wher gone get ripped of, but biger cc gives you a lot more tourq that makes it funn to go from 20mph to 55mph.
    Its not somthing i can put words to but the pure feeling of the tourq just puts a big fat smile on your face:wink:
    I would rather buy a nice used v-star1100 or any 750+ cruser then a new 250cc.
    Ofcourse thers nothing wrong with buying a 250cc :)

    But i love the looks of Triumph Speedmaster wich is an Triumph American sport version.
    [​IMG]
    #94
  15. mogwai

    mogwai humorless prick

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    I like the mid-sized metric cruisers, but would insist on an aftermarket seat and back rest.
    #95
  16. JerryH

    JerryH Long timer

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    The Vulcan 750 has what is basically a sportbike engine. It makes about 68 hp, has a 9000 rpm redline, tops out at 120 mph, and does the 1/4 mile in just a hair over 12 seconds. It will cruise at a GPS 80 mph all day long only halfway to redline. It's also small, lightweight, and has very conservative steering geometry for a cruiser, so it handles very well. Both Harley and Victory have made attempts at "sport cruisers", but I think the Vulcan 750 beat them to it by about 15 years. I like the looks of the Triumph Speedmaster, it has the same engine as the regular Bonneville, which means it may be a bit down on power. But to me, acceleration and top speed are not a major issue, what is is a bikes ability to cruise on the open road comfortably at freeway speeds day after day without being overstressed.

    I find the stock Vulcan 750 seat to be extremely comfortable, but a riders backrest will make a major improvement in comfort on most any cruiser.
    #96
  17. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    cool!!! thanks for the advices!!

    Damasovi
    #97
  18. JerryH

    JerryH Long timer

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    #98
  19. ka5ysy

    ka5ysy Doug

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    Jerry, there was something else wrong with your bike. No generator or regulator setup shorts out its "excess" power to ground, and does not run at maximum load unless there is something drawing that current. Generators are rated for a maximum current load and do not deliver more current than is demanded. I have a 48KW generator for my house, and the maximum load it ever delivers with everything in the house turned on is about 33KW by design. It simply idles along most of the time when running. If I only plug in a 100 watt bulb to it, the bulb will light up and the generator is only delivering 100 watts to it, not 48KW and 200+ amps.

    My BMW R1200RT has a 720W alternator, and it only runs about half that load with the accessory setup I have.

    I would bet that the stator had something shorted and was frying the regulator. I had a similar problem with a Kohler lawnmower engine, and it was a bad stator. It even burned up the external wiring harness when it shorted out internally.
    #99
  20. JerryH

    JerryH Long timer

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    You are correct for alternators and generators, as used on cars, and the '88 and up Goldwing, and for portable gas powered generators, but not for motorcycle STATORS. At idle their ouput is usually low, sometimes so low that prolonged idling will drain the battery. But at higher speeds, they run wide open. There is no output control on them. Their output is not based on load like a car. Excess current is shorted (or to quote the manual, "shunted") to ground, through a resistor in the regulator/rectifier. The R/R is a heat sink, and will normally handle the heat caused by this. But on the '85 Goldwing 1200 LTD, which is fuel injected, the stator is a whopping 500 watts, and it is putting out 500 watts at all times when engine speed is high enough. A carbed Goldwing only puts out 350 watts. Now, while I consider this a stupid design, it is the way most motorcycle charging systems work. And with lower output stators, it is not usually a problem, other than generating to much current, then disposing (wasting) it as heat. But the R/R on the LTD simply did not have the capacity to handle all the current that was being dumped into it. A larger capacity R/R would have solved the issues I was having with it (R/R overheating, getting so hot it actually set the insulation on some wires that were touching it on fire) it is still a really dumb design. Most motorcycles continue ton use this design today. You will find few (I only know of one) motorcycles where the alternator field output can be controlled.

    It looks like from your user name you are an amateur radio operator. So am I. Have been since 1983. I also work on auto OBDII systems for a living. I never understood how motorcycle charging systems worked either until getting that Goldwing. I had never had any problems with them.