Riding with cruisers.. I want one!!

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by damasovi, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    You are correct for alternators and generators, as used on cars, and the '88 and up Goldwing, and for portable gas powered generators, but not for motorcycle STATORS. At idle their ouput is usually low, sometimes so low that prolonged idling will drain the battery. But at higher speeds, they run wide open. There is no output control on them. Their output is not based on load like a car. Excess current is shorted (or to quote the manual, "shunted") to ground, through a resistor in the regulator/rectifier. The R/R is a heat sink, and will normally handle the heat caused by this. But on the '85 Goldwing 1200 LTD, which is fuel injected, the stator is a whopping 500 watts, and it is putting out 500 watts at all times when engine speed is high enough. A carbed Goldwing only puts out 350 watts. Now, while I consider this a stupid design, it is the way most motorcycle charging systems work. And with lower output stators, it is not usually a problem, other than generating to much current, then disposing (wasting) it as heat. But the R/R on the LTD simply did not have the capacity to handle all the current that was being dumped into it. A larger capacity R/R would have solved the issues I was having with it (R/R overheating, getting so hot it actually set the insulation on some wires that were touching it on fire) it is still a really dumb design. Most motorcycles continue ton use this design today. You will find few (I only know of one) motorcycles where the alternator field output can be controlled.

    It looks like from your user name you are an amateur radio operator. So am I. Have been since 1983. I also work on auto OBDII systems for a living. I never understood how motorcycle charging systems worked either until getting that Goldwing. I had never had any problems with them.
  2. motorat

    motorat TBD

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  3. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    Wow, a 250 that looks like a much larger bike. But it is Korean and cost the same as the Japanese 250s. However, it does have one major advantage, depending on it's reliability. It has tubeless tires that can actually be repaired on the side of the road. But if it is not reliable, it doesn't make much difference to me whether I am stranded by a flat tire or a blown engine.

    The V-Star is a good bike, been around a long time, proven reliable. But I wouldn't go very far on it, it has tube type tires and no centerstand, so a flat is going to shut you down. I wonder if the wheels from the Hyosung would fit the V-Star? The cast wheels from the Hensim Rebel clone fit a real Rebel.
  4. ZZ-R Rider

    ZZ-R Rider Captain Fantastic

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    Gawd, that white Shadow RS with the yellow striping is fricken gorgeous!!!

    Talking to many owners of the Kawi Vulcan VN900 Classic and seeing what they go for on the used market, it seems that in the mid-size Cruiser segment, it is arguably one of the best "bangs for buck" out there ... I have heard it described as a smaller, lighter Heritage Softail ...
  5. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    "I have heard it described as a smaller, lighter Heritage Softail" Hmm.

    The Yamaha V-Star 950 is a better bike. It has cast wheels and tubeless tires. Plug and go. If you have a flat on the Vulcan you will have to call for road service. If your cell phone works. Could also cost you a fortune depending on your plan and where you are.
  6. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    yesterday we did a nice ride up to Palomar Mountain and all in all 380 miles, we were a total of 9 motorcycles 7 cruisers, 1 cbr 600rr and my klr.

    i was leading the group and when the road turn extremely twisty only 2 other follow my super fast KLR, as you might expect the CBR and a Vstar 650, my friend Ruben with HIS wife never fell behind and I am sure he could have pass me in several turns if he had wanted... I have new respect for his bike, for him and his wife! I can see myself riding that bike!

    Damasovi
  7. Sir Not Appearing

    Sir Not Appearing That's no ordinary rabbit

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    I have a Suzuki Boulevard S50 and the shaft drive is 2nd on my list of dislikes. I still like the bike and it makes a good commuter and its the only bike the wife likes for 2-up, but the shaft-jacking can get old. Number one dislike is the gigantic engine cradle under the engine that likes to lever the back wheel off the ground when going around fairly mild corners. Lots of pucker moments, but haven't dumped it yet.
  8. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    I love shaft drive, and have never experienced this "jacking" issue everybody complains about. I understand what supposedly causes it, and could see it being an issue on a high powered sport bike, but they all use chains. BMWs Paralever system was supposed to eliminate it. But I never noticed it on my Vulcan 750, Goldwing 1200, Goldwing 1500, and going back a ways, my '81 Silverwing 500 or my '87 Magna 700.

    On some bikes shaft drive is nearly maintenance free. But not on the Goldwings and Vulcan. The rear end has to be disassembled every so often and the shaft splines lubricated with a moly paste. It's a real PITA. It's a really big job on the Goldwing, because the saddlebags and all the supporting framework have to come off. But on the other hand, you don't have to constantly deal with a chain. For me the biggest advantage to shaft drive is that it positively locates the rear axle in the swingarm, eliminating the need for elongated holes, and the possibility of the wheel becoming misaligned in the swing arm.

    I am familiar with the footpeg support on the Intruder if that is what you are talking about. The big chrome piece that wraps under the frame that the pegs are attached to. I'm pretty sure it was put there for looks, but it is certainly substantial enough to lift the bike off the ground if it drags. Cruisers are not known for their cornering ability.
  9. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    well, the other weekend a friend asked to borrow my klr for a test, and he has a yamaha vstar 650, one like the one in the pic bellow.

    [​IMG]

    I like it, at first I was like "does it have a flat? or two?" it was so short! Remember I was getting of the 35 in. seat of the KLR to this what? 27? Then I was amaze at how my 5"3?-5 friend was climbing on my bike!

    Of course this being my first ride on a cruiser in over a year and only the second time ever, I was wondering where everything was, things like that. Up to 60 mph it was fine then I wanted to go 70 but the thing started vibrating a lot! not on my arms or hands, but on the top part of my butt, you see the seat (not the standard) has a small lower back support, but it was transmitting all the bad vibes.. so I just maintain 60-65 and all was good.

    It did feel with power, not too much to scare me, not too little, along the lines of the KLR but with no Beatles sound.

    Damasovi
  10. MariusD

    MariusD Been here awhile

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    yep, your highway experience describes just about every 900cc or smaller cruiser. They are great around town, for shorter rides, and can do highway, but not for long, and not very comfortably. For that reason, I think you should be looking at bikes of 1100cc and above if you go on long rides. Just my humble opinion :D
  11. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    I put over 20,000 highway miles on a Honda 250 Rebel. It was uncomfortable because it was too small for me, but it had no problem doing highway speeds for hours at the time. Today's cruiser engines are poorly designed. The early Honda Shadow 750, Vulcan 750, Yamaha Virago 750, and Suzuki Intruder 750 had no problems cruising at well over today's highway speeds for as long as the rider could hold out. I find it amazing that a 900cc engine is not capable of highway travel. There is nothing small about 900cc. The first Japanese 900cc bike was the KZ900, and it was a rocketship. The first Japanese cruiser was the KZ900 LTD,, and it blew Kawasaki's "muscle cruiser" the Mean Streak into the weeds. And with 600cc less. Suzuki's late S50 800cc would blow away pretty much any current v-twin, no matter what size it was. V-twin cruisers don't have to be slow, the manufacturers choose to make them that way.
  12. Tucson Jim

    Tucson Jim Been here awhile

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    I guess it all boils down to personal preference. Try out some models and see what you like.

    I did 4300 miles in 9 days (Tucson to Calgary, Vancouver and back) on my Vulcan 1500, shaft drive, FI, and liquid cooled. No problems.

    Had to keep changing positions but I think I would do that on any bike.
  13. buck80mph

    buck80mph "Power Junkie"

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    I know the feeling!