Rookie wanna-be weldor starting to make some cool things!

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by kirkster70, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Looks great!:clap

    Time for a beer!:freaky

    Jim :brow
  2. wilkinsonk

    wilkinsonk soup de grimace

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    kirkster70,

    Had you thought of using plug weld in the interior of the plate to get more material bonding the plate to the frame? It would have seemed pretty easy to do and may have added a little more rigidity to that part of the repair.

    Just a thought,
    Ken
  3. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Thanks, Jim!
  4. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Hi Ken,

    Yeah, I did consider doing a series of about 4 plug welds down each side on the top. You can see in the pic below where I had started to make a couple small marker dots on where I wanted the plug welds to be...

    [​IMG]

    It's 1/8" plate and is very rigid. It conformed to the frame better than I thought it would. The welded areas around the factory holes took the place of plug welds on that side. The way I wrapped it in a C shape, I'm not sure if plug welds would have made a huge difference or not on rigidity.

    I'm very happy with the outcome. Now I'll have to look for something else broken. :D
  5. peterman

    peterman cop magnet

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    next time you are at the weld supply,,pick up a 60 grit flapper wheel for your 4 1/2" grinder. Trust me! You'll like it!
    It'll get rid of all those grinder marks and scratches, and leave a much nicer surface,,esp. if you plan to paint,,those grinder marks will show right thru.
    a few seconds with a flapper wheel and you have smooth shiny metal ready for paint. They strip paint and rust pretty well too.
    Looks like you are having fun, so you are doing that part right!:clap
    Oh,, and unless it's really windy where you are working,,you can likely cut your shielding gas down to around 17,,I run 19 to 20 with fans blowing, and 17 in the still/calm air.
    good looking work, keep it up!
  6. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    I have used flapper wheels and they do work great. Grind and finish all in one without changing wheels. I had a pretty good assortment of grits, but burned them all up and just haven't bought more yet. 10) 40 grit wheels came with the Makita grinder I bought, so I've been using them. This isn't a super critical repair appearance-wise, so I didn't worry too much. With all the covers back in place, you have to look for the repair while kneeling on the ground.

    My welding books say 20 cfh, but the panel on front of the MM252 says 25 cfh. I have dropped down to 20 before while trying to make a tank last a bit longer, and I can see the difference. Yesterday I was in the garage with no wind and set the regulator to 20 and got a bit of porosity in a couple of tacks, so I just went back to 25 and all was fine. Maybe it has something to do with the style of torch that comes from the factory? I dunno.

    Thanks! Yep, I have been having a blast with the welder. It's amazing what you can do with one.
  7. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    [​IMG]

    Tractor going back together. Aside from leaning over the fenders, this was very much like doing an engine swap in a full size auto. Wiring and plumbing everywhere! I take the time to clean and lube parts as I go. I'm glad I tore it down because I found a couple issues that were pretty easy to correct. She's now ready for another 20 years of abuse.

    [​IMG]

    The stock skids were missing, so I installed a set of heavy-duty Moose skids normally used on ATV snow blades. I just welded a piece of strut onto the blower housing so I could bolt the brackets on.

    [​IMG]

    I got everything hooked back up and the snowblower had some vibration. The tip of one of the fan blades was broken off and missing. I made a pattern of the above pictured blade tip and went to work.

    [​IMG]

    Using the same 1/8" scrap I fixed the frame with, I repair the broken fan blade. I spray the metal with some zinc galvanizing paint for now to keep the rust at bay. It was a half hour job and it eliminated the vibration completely.

    [​IMG]

    Swiss cheese tractor ready for duty. Those friggin' holes in the hood will be fixed come spring. The entire tractor and snowblower will receive a complete Honda red basecoat/clearcoat paintjob with new decals. My goal was to get everything mechanical working 100% first, and then focus on looks.
  8. TrainedChimp

    TrainedChimp Consistently wrong

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    What were all those holes for? Was that someone's solution to overheating? :huh
  9. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Exactly!!!! On a liquid-cooled engine with a fan pulling air through a radiator no less!!!

    It's a constant reminder to look a little closer at what the heck I'm buying. I have years and years of experience of fixing people's junk, so in time I'll get her back to good.
  10. EvilGenius

    EvilGenius 1.5 Finger Discount

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    Speed holes.
  11. DaBit

    DaBit Been here awhile

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    Can't resist posting a few photo's of my own welding.

    I own a few decades old transformer-based DC-TIG machine to which I added a homemade AC-inverter (for aluminium) and liquid cooled torch (smaller/lighter/more flexible=better). A lot of bang for the few hundred bucks it costed.
    And I'm also a bit nuts. Always a lot of fun; nutty guys owning a welder :D

    Still trying to get the hang of aluminium welding, especially without any special knobs and programs to help me (I can set the current and AC-balance, that's it).

    Modified welder:
    [​IMG]

    Now, some time ago I wanted to transplant a fork in my SV, but the triple hit the radiator. So what does one do? Make your own radiators of course! (told ya I'm crazy).

    Modified heater core, to be used as standard radiator replacement:

    [​IMG]

    Pretty thin and dirty aluminium (pipe = 17mm)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The idea, still under construction

    $20 heater core sawed in two and welded shut = $10 per radiator. Welder paid off, compared to buying new stuff.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Steel welds:
    [​IMG]

    2 steering stems, one sized 'too small' and one 'wont fit' mated together into a useable one. This was quite a hard job since the stem needs to stay absolutely straight. But with 'too small' and 'wont fit' one has nothing to loose except some gas and filler. I succeeded keeping things straight, which was by far the hardest part.
    [​IMG]

    Oh well, I can post a million welding pictures if I want. Especially the close-to-impossible (with my abilities; I have yet to finish my second hobby-sized argon tank) jobs like the angled hose entry on the radiator and steering stem are soooo much fun to do.

    Also, no MIG for me. I like chasing that little puddle of fluid steel with some tungsten. Might be a little slower sometimes, but so what? What isn't finished today will be finished tomorrow. Or next week. Or next month.
  12. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Ha Ha! :lol3

    My neighbor told me just to paint it yellow and wear a cheeshead hat. :huh :rofl
  13. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Awesome work! Looks like you and your modified welder are putting out some fantastic welds! I've never even considered modifying a radiator before. Very slick!
  14. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    With Christmas coming, I wanted to make something nice for one of my family members. I decide to make a fire pit. I don't have anything to measure from or compare to, but I just decide that an outside diameter of 24" and a depth of 12" should be about right. I make it 6-sided for 3 legs. That will sit on an uneven surface better than 4 legs. I use some quadrille paper and come up with a design so I have some dimensions to go by...

    [​IMG]

    Rummaging through my scrap pile, I find some 14 gauge sides from a UPS system that was decomissioned. I make all my cuts with the plasma cutter. You can see where I cut out the bottom in this pic...

    [​IMG]

    Yeah, it's galvanized. Not ideal for welding, but I have the exhaust fans on full blast and take frequent fresh air breaks. I also drink lots of milk just to be sure I don't get sick from the dreaded "metal fume fever".

    [​IMG]

    All sides welded up with solid .035 wire and Argon/CO2 gas. Everything is already dressed up with the grinder in this pic. I even signed and dated the bottom with the welder because this will be my first attempt at something artistic even though it's something functional. Maybe it will stand the test of time and still be here when I'm gone. Who knows.

    [​IMG]

    1" x 1/8" expanded metal also cut with the plasma. I make standoffs out of 1" schedule 40 sprinkler pipe and weld them to the expanded metal for support. This is just resting in place and lifts out for ash removal.

    I just placed my first order with King Architectural Metals for some decorative add-ons and some fancy handrail ends that I will modify for the legs of the fire pit. Once all complete I will spraypaint everything with high-heat flat black stove paint.

    So far so good. I'll post more when I have more to show...
  15. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Thanks, lousot!

    Here are more piccys...

    [​IMG]

    The top edge looked unfinished and dangerous to me. If a kid fell around the fire pit, it could cut off an arm. Ugh. I once again root around in the scrap pile and come up with some 1" x 1/8" angle. It came from those shelves that I made the DR350 panniers and KLR650 top box from. Scrap is my friend.

    [​IMG]

    Hmmm. That should look pretty decent.

    [​IMG]

    Powdercoat ground off the angle and tacked in place. It's a bit tricky to cut being mitered and on an angle, but I develop a technique of making two cuts on each end to keep my portaband from getting in a bind.

    [​IMG]

    All tacked in place and ready for weld-up.

    [​IMG]

    Welding complete. Now I need to dress up the welds once again with the grinder. That looks MUCH better. I'm also going to trim around the expanded metal for a nicer look. More pics when I have something to show. I think it looks pretty good for scrap metal. :D
  16. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    My order shows up today and I get all set to do some real "pastry chef" welding! :rofl

    I bought some forged steel "lamb's tongue" handrail ends for use as legs. I thought they looked pretty nice. I transfer the angle to the legs and cut off what I don't need. More scrap! :D

    [​IMG]

    I make sure the dimensions on the legs are all the same and then cut the same length/angle on all three legs.

    [​IMG]

    I set my machine for 14 gauge (the fire pit's thickness) and then weld the thicker leg to the pit by concentrating more heat on the leg. I do an up and down motion pausing for a split second longer on the leg and directing the weld puddle toward the leg. I measure off the wall to be sure I'm setting the legs at the angle I want.

    [​IMG]

    Once all legs are welded on the top side, I flip the pit over and weld the bottom of each leg.

    [​IMG]

    TA-DA!!! Getting closer every minute...

    [​IMG]

    And for the ultimate in pastry chef welding, I bought some stamped steel design elements to decorate the outside with.

    [​IMG]

    I still need to weld a border around the expanded metal grate, tack on the above gizmos, dress up a couple weld areas and then spraybomb everything with high-heat stove paint. I hope my sis-in-law likes it!
  17. JamesG

    JamesG Rabid Poster

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    You're not supersport legal any more. :rofl
  18. mike-s

    mike-s 2 squeaky wheels

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    Are you putting them on with some light plug welds from the inside?
  19. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    I'm going to try to. They are stamped steel, not cast, so the backside isn't flat. If the backside was flat, it would be a piece of cake to do a plug weld. They are of thin material, so plug welding the edge from the inside will probably look about the same as tacking from the front.

    - unless I weld an armature to the inside of the stamped steel to make it have a flat side that I could then plug weld to.

    Or I may just do a full weld on the outside and dress everything up with a die grinder. I'm not sure how I will do it just yet. The stamped steel is about the thickness of a cookie cutter. I may have to do some experimenting.
  20. Luke

    Luke GPoET&P

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    I may have missed it, but are you planning on taking off the galvanization on the inside? Fire may not vaporize it like a welder will, but it'll burn it which may make a nasty mess under the paint.