Rookie wanna-be weldor starting to make some cool things!

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by kirkster70, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    What are you waiting for? :D

    I've heard that 140s are plenty of welder for most home projects. I have two friends with Millermatic 140s and they won't give 'em up for anything!

    The guy I bought the TIG from also had a MM210, and he had the same feelings. I asked if I could buy that while I was there and he said NO WAY! Ha Ha! :D

    Post up when you get going. Let the addiction begin!:lol3
    #81
  2. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

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    Yes, panheads would work as well. Carriage bolts were just the first that came to mind. The main reason I suggested it is that I've seen the effects of objects rubbing on each other while bouncing around in panniers. Again, great fabrication and inspiration.



    #82
  3. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    Awesome job, very jealous. You finally got me off my rear end to get my old Lincoln SP 150 up and running. Just got the cyl filled yesterday. Now I need something to weld...:lol3

    I would rethink the herculiner on the inside. Its a pain to clean, the alum you have now you can spray down with cleaner and wipe perfectly clean. The Hurculiner traps dirt and crap and is a pain. I also personally don't like it for the outside but your call. Reasons are the same for the inside. If you do do it, make sure you do fanatical prep work. I had a custom steel bumper made for my truck and used that stuff. It lasted 6 months and started peeling. It got REAL old redoing it all the time. If you have the coin, powdercoating would def be my first choice and look awesome. Maybe you could trade your skills with the coater...
    #83
  4. Captain Beardylocks

    Captain Beardylocks travelling beardo

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    your work looks great! I just finished a welding course and I'm trying to put togeather the equipment/workspace to do these kind of projects over the winter. This thread is definitely helpful. Thanks! :thumb
    #84
  5. Quacked

    Quacked Loose Head Bolt

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    The bags look great!

    I'm really looking forward to what you're going to do with a top case! :lurk
    #85
  6. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Thanks!

    I'm not planning on bedlining the exterior at all - only the interior. As long as the bag seals properly, I'm not sure how it will get dirty inside unless I put dirty boots or the like in the bag.

    I used to do custom paint, so I know about proper prep. My rule of thumb has always been "if it's shiny, it's not sticking". I will degrease the inside first, then sand with 80 grit until there is absolutely no shine to be seen for the liner to have a "tooth" for a good, mechanical bond. Then I will degrease once again. A lot of times people will actually grind impurities into the base by sanding before degreasing. And even degreasing has to be done a certian way - i.e. - if you just smear degreaser around, all it's doing is moving the impurity to another place to dry. I always use a rag with degreaser, followed by a clean rag to mop up. Once the clean rag is saturated, get another one.

    So yeah, I think the bedliner will be fine for what I want it to do. As a plus, I think it will keep loose items from sliding around so much. I'm trying to stay away from powdercoat simply because I'm tying to keep it 100% D.I.Y. plus I do like the look of the unfinished aluminum.
    #86
  7. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Thank you very much!
    #87
  8. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Thanks!

    I think I will come up with something. I have a Cortech top bag that I use as my lunchbox for work. I was thinking it would fit nicely in one bag, but that's not the case. I have to scrunch everthing up for it to fit, so that seems like a royal PITA to me. Plus, who wants to eat food that has been scrunched? :rofl

    I need to order some more aluminum, but I will probably end up making a top case with dimensions specific to my bag.

    I will probably do my redneck lift first, plus I also want to make some front crash bars with hoops for LED driving lights, so the top case will take a back seat to both of those projects.

    It's deer hittin' time, and I want to protect my legs if I go down again. I totaled a very nice ST1100 this time last year. I credit the ST for protecting my legs with the bags on the back, and tip over wings (hidden engine gaurds) in the front. It made a pocket that kept the bike from grinding my legs into the pavement like a cheese grater.

    If I had REAL front crash bars (not plastic protectors for a tip-over on a trail) I would feel much safer riding this time of year. So that will happen before the top case.
    #88
  9. the kaz

    the kaz has become "FERAL"

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    OK I am impressed :clap
    and my welding gear has never looked that shiny :lol3 :lol3
    #89
  10. hilld

    hilld riding isn't an addiction

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    I didn't think that you could powdercoat aluminum as it is not magnetic. We have always anodized aluminum if you wanted to coat it with something. Maybe there is a new way of doing, I would like to know about it.
    #90
  11. groundrules

    groundrules Long timer

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    My understanding is that it doesn't have to be susceptible to magnetism, just has to carry an electric charge.
    #91
  12. the kaz

    the kaz has become "FERAL"

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    We have been selling Ambulances that have the entire aluminum body powdercoated :eek1 YUP the factory has one big assed oven :D
    They only started doing full bodies four years ago but before that they have been doing doors and parts for decades.......not cheap but worth it in the long run.
    #92
  13. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    Mostly correct..........nothing to do with magnets............the item being coated needs a slight charge and is cured with heat................they can powder coat just about anything that can be charged and withstand some heating....... examples: nowdays wood and wood products are often powder coated.
    #93
  14. hilld

    hilld riding isn't an addiction

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    Always good to get more educated. Thanks for that info.
    #94
  15. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Thanks!

    It's funny to look at the first photo of my table, and look at it after 3 mos. It's getting pretty smoked up!

    So is everything else. I have holes and burn marks in everything! :D
    #95
  16. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    More piccys...

    [​IMG]

    I use 900 to prep, then I scuff with 80 grit dry sandpaper, then clean up with 901.

    Dishsoap is actually one of the best degreasers you can use, but 900 and 901 evaporate very fast so you don't have to wait for it to dry.

    [​IMG]

    I mix the bedliner well, then start dabbing the seams with a 2" disposable brush. Make sure to mask off the mounting holes on the exterior.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then I use a 3" trim roller to apply the first coat.

    [​IMG]

    The instructions say to wait 1-2 hours for the second coat. While I'm waiting, I fab up and paint some rear turn signal relocation brackets out of 3/16" x 1 1/2" flatbar.

    [​IMG]

    Second coat applied and waiting to dry. Once all dry I will clean up the excess on the lip underneath.

    [​IMG]

    Brackets are dry, so I mount the signals. I moved them straight back 2 1/4". Luckily, I had rewired my whole bike (due to poor wireharness routing from the factory) and mounted the signal connectors under the seat for protection. When I did that, I had to extend everything, so there was plenty of slack without having to re-do the wiring.

    Tomorrow will be another trip to the hardware store for some 3/8" panhead bolts to remount the lower support.
    #96
  17. Iwantabikesobad

    Iwantabikesobad Long timer

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    Awesome job. Looks like you have the tool side of things covered.
    Take a look at these, I have one and really like it. Yes it really does what they advertise.
    It might be a way for some of you to get into welding with less expense.
    http://www.cut-like-plasma.com/
    #97
  18. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Niiiice torch! Definately on the want list as well.
    #98
  19. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    The bags are finished, so I start back on the low buck lift.

    [​IMG]

    End supports from the lift and base are cut out of the way and preliminary framing for the base begins.

    [​IMG]

    I finally run out of my very first 10 lb. spool of filler wire and remember to install an ear plug to keep dust and grit off the wire as it enters the liner. Thanks for the helpful tip BIGJim!!

    [​IMG]

    My garage helper supplies 48 lbs. of test load. :D

    [​IMG]

    I add another outside piece of channel to the lift platform.

    [​IMG]

    Another lift with approximately 175 lbs. The results are promising! No flex.

    [​IMG]

    A full tank of gas puts this load at 500 lbs or so. Now we have some sag at the rear, but everything seems quite stable. I will have to beef up the platform a bit more, but at least I know it will work. I have some flatbar that I got for free when getting all the scrap from the battery racks, so I will box the strut for more rigidity. I will also add another channel to the outside of the base and box it.

    I will figure out a way to make the rear lock into different slots as it raises. That will add a good degree of safety.

    So...lift : free, materials : free, gas and filler wire : maybe 10 bucks, and about 6 hours of welding practice. Once I'm happy with the framing, I will probably cover the deck with some thin diamond plate.

    The bags are finished, and I'm quite happy with them. I road tested them for about 400 miles before using the bedliner on them. I didn't notice any difference in handling, which was a total surprise to me. I'm sure with a heavy load I will notice a difference.

    I added some reflectors to the bags from a H-D Electraglide that I've been hanging onto for 5 years or so. They were from a customer's bike I painted, and he didn't want them. Yes, the packrat in me appears once again! :lol3

    More to come next week.
    #99
  20. capeklr

    capeklr Been here awhile

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    Wow is about all I can say.
    You did all this in a few month as a working family man, what are you going to get up to when you retire?
    Very inspiring, keep it up.
    Time for me to dust off my welder.:D