Rookie wanna-be weldor starting to make some cool things!

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by kirkster70, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. changingground

    changingground Been here awhile

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    Great link, thanks. Initially I thought that guy was going to be a low-budget hack (crazy, messy shop), but boy, he's got some skills!
  2. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    I thought it was pretty awesome, too. Pure talent right there.
  3. josjor

    josjor Long timer

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    I sent Kirkster a PM about this but thought I would make it public for others that want to try it.

    Use a flap disk on your angle grinder to dish out the log a bit. It makes it a lot easier to hammer bowl shapes. The deeper you dish out, the deeper you can hammer stuff.

    I use this technique on a lot of things. Right now I'm whacking out a lot of these as simple little Christmas gifts. I either weld a little hook on the back for wall mounting or some feet on it for the table top. People love them and they're simple. When I'm done whacking and welding I let them soak in a acid/water bath for a few hours and then set them out for a rust patina.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  4. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Very, very nice! Are you using muriatic acid? Diluted, I'm guessing?


    I'm planning on doing the same with the current project I'm on, but haven't tried it yet...
  5. josjor

    josjor Long timer

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    Correct, sir. Once you get into the hammering stuff, get your hands on some heavy copper. It's really fun stuff to work with. I use the acid bath on it as well, to get rid of the scale formed when you anneal the copper.

    This one is actually mostly flat stock, but the nose and eyes and tongue are stump formed.
    [​IMG]
  6. wilkinsonk

    wilkinsonk soup de grimace

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    You can also use a leather sand bag to the same effect in case you don't have a place to store your very own forming stump. You can add or subtract sand based on how much dish you want. An upside is that unlike the wood the leather will not impart its imperfections into the metal.

    Here's an example, but if you're handy you could make your own.

    http://www.eastwood.com/ew-panelbeater-sandbag.html

    - Ken
  7. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Very good info! Thanks, Ken.


    I knew about the leather bags, but never thought about the imperfections part. I like it when people chime in and we all learn something along the way. :freaky
  8. CaptTeach

    CaptTeach Been here awhile

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    HF has several size teardrop mallets for a reasonable price - it will move your work much smoother and faster than that ball peen hammer of your grandfathers.

    +1 on the shot bags - I found mine on Ebay. The vendor was selling a package deal of three bags One used as a slap dolly and a small bag about 5insq then a 14in bag for heavy work

    Good luck with your projects
  9. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    True, but I was going for a texture, so I used the smallest ball end I could find.

    I do need some nice mallets for if I'm looking for as smooth as possible...

    Thanks!
  10. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    [​IMG]

    I cut out the other side and shape it with the hammer. I MIG the halves together and shape the pieces with the hammer and grinder as I go.

    Above is the side I shaped with the ball end of the hammer...

    [​IMG]

    ...and above is the peen side - much smoother. I just wanted to see the difference so I could pick which side I wanted for the front.

    [​IMG]

    I like the texture of the ball side better, so that becomes the front of this project. Now for a decorative ribbon out of 22ga. scrap.

    [​IMG]

    After cutting it out, I can simply bend it by hand.

    [​IMG]

    ... to go here.

    [​IMG]

    I drill a 1/4" hole in the ribbon and plug weld it to the heart. Then I use a flap wheel and grind it smooth so you can't see how it's attached.

    [​IMG]

    I bend a piece of 3/32" ER70S-6 mild steel TIG wire and MIG it to the back for a hanger.

    The texture on the front gave me a neat idea for a finish that should work...
  11. bergermeister

    bergermeister Long timer

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  12. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    ^ Thank you for the link. King Architectural Metals has similar coatings in their catalog. I've been meaning to try some of these. Thanks again.
  13. phreakingeek

    phreakingeek rookie adventurer

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    One of the finishes we used in our blacksmithing class was applied at a low heat. We brushed the piece with a brass brush and the brass will transfer to the piece and give you a nice golden color.

    We were cautioned to go easy on the brass coloring since it's easy to over do that and make it look very gothic gold leaf looking.
  14. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Very interesting! :clap

    Hey? I wish you would post up more info. on your blacksmithing. Show us your coal forge and all the goodies you guys are making.

    Feel free to post to this thread or you can even start a blacksmithing thread. I imagine you are making some very nice things.
  15. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    I have some heavy lifting coming up, so I decide to make a roll-around gantry crane...

    [​IMG]

    I've been eyeballing this hoist on Craigslist for some time, and finally get the coin to make it happen. The seller was awesome and had all kinds of cool inventions he came up with using his MIG. I didn't really want to leave! Thanks, Jack!

    [​IMG]

    I whip up a quick sketch for some very crude dimensions so I have a rough idea on how much material to buy. The design is from much research and also from some very good tips from some inmates here.

    Square tube ends up being about 40% more than schedule 40, but I go with square tube thinking it will be easier to drill for adjustments, and should be easier to miter.

    [​IMG]

    Hot-rolled 3 1/2" x 1/4" and 4" x 3/16" square tube. Square tube is measured by outside diameter, so I chose 3/16" wall on the 4" to be sure that the 3 1/2" doesn't bind on the innner weld seam of the 4".

    I bought 2 full sticks (20 and 24 feet respectively), and paid a cut charge to make sure I could transport them safely.

    8" diameter x 2" wide, heavy-duty, swivel casters with brakes have been ordered on ebay. This puppy is gonna' be HEAVY! :lol3

    I love it when a project comes together!
  16. 100mpg

    100mpg Self Imposed Exile

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    Heavy is a bag of cement. That thing is going to be mega. :D
    10'6" high? is that going to fit in the garage? or are you building it to raise the garage roof?

    I am thinking about small project. A 16 gauge case case. I am not trying to keep out pro's just enough that I can have them locked up. I could not get a regular safe down these stairs (dont ask)
  17. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    :lol3 That's 437lbs of steel on the floor.

    Yep, in the lowered position, the crane should be 7' +/- to the top. It will likely live outside with weather protection over the motor and control, though. The cool part is that I will be able to raise it to pick off of the truck or trailer, drop the beam, re-rig and roll the load in the garage. Suh-weet!

    What's a case case? Whatever it is, post up progress piccys. :D
  18. 100mpg

    100mpg Self Imposed Exile

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    :lol3 Either my fingers or brain when on vacation at that moment. What I was trying to type was Gun case. If I ever figure out a lock mechanism, I will post some piccycs! :D
  19. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    [​IMG]

    Legs and main post collars cut out with a 4 1/2" cutting wheel in a grinder. I cut the angles first, then connected the lines with a square. Then I do my best to angle the cutting wheel at 30 and 60 degree angles to connect the cuts. It's the best way I can do it for now. A large, compound miter bandsaw is in my future. The cutting wheel method really didn't take very long at all. It works for now.

    [​IMG]

    I double check my 5' measurement. The casters should take me close to 6'. I can fine tune the height of the collar that attaches to the beam to get my desired height.
  20. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    I thought maybe it was a lockable Case knife case! :freaky