Rookie wanna-be weldor starting to make some cool things!

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by kirkster70, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. DaBit

    DaBit Been here awhile

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    @Kirkster,

    How do you cut that steel plate so straight with the grinder? Anything special? I seem to always have a slight wobble in the cut or other mayhem. Usign good quality cutting discs and grinder of course.
    I swapped to the reciprocating saw instead because of that, but it's a lot slower.
  2. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Ooops! I totally missed that the first time. Doh!.

    Looks like I need to be a member to view the piccys...
  3. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    No offense taken whatsoever.

    On all the plate I just welded, I left an open corner for plenty of fill.

    Sometimes I will do a forehand or backhand stringer, so one has more deposition than the other. I see a lot of heat and discoloration on the backside of the thick pieces I'm welding, so I think I have good penetration. Some of the joints even have a bit of undercutting on each side, so I dunno,,,
  4. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    I haven't been able to see any noticeable differences in cut quality between various brands of cutting wheels.

    I've been using the cheapest I can find for the most part. I've been using DeWalt discs here lately. Tractor Supply has them at $1.99 each, so I normally buy 10 at a time when I'm in there. I could probably find them even cheaper online.

    I don't try to make the entire depth of the cut on the first swipe. I just slowly walk the disc down the mark letting the weight of the grinder do the work. The first pass is all about being on the line. Then I just do that 10 or 15 more times until through. I do my best to keep the wheel straight both ways. If you cock it left or right even a little bit, it makes for a wide cut, and the wheel will want to bind and/or jump around. After about halfway through something thick, I can cut forwards and backwards in the same cut pretty easily. I've gotten so proficient with the cutting wheel, that the plasma is gathering dust. Part of that is due to the fact that I need some consumables for it, but I haven't really been bothered to order any with the cuts I'm getting out of the little grinder. I hope this helps! :clap
  5. wilkinsonk

    wilkinsonk soup de grimace

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    When I get back to Virginia next month I'll come by with 10 dozen cutting disks and trade them for you plasma cutter. :deal
  6. 9Dave

    9Dave Bazinga!

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    Welper YS-50:deal

    I picked up a pair when I was at the Lincoln school after the instructor gave me crap about my cheap retail Lincoln branded Matadors. :lol3

    They cut wire cleanly, clean nozzles well, and remove tips and nozzles without chewing them up. :thumb
  7. 100mpg

    100mpg Self Imposed Exile

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    :rofl
  8. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    First off, I have loved your thread so far as it reminds me why years ago I went got my certs. It is so fun watching people discover their talents and developing their skills as they move along. Big props to you! I look forward to seeing this gantry completed,

    Now, if I missed this somewhere in your thread please ignore, but when working with galvanized material you need to be especially careful as the by product of the zinc oxide coating coming off in fumes is the same chemical compound that was used in WWI nerve gas. It will destroy your lungs and in large enough quantity can lead to serious consequences. You need to keep your head out of direct fumes and good ventilation at all times.
  9. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    You may think I'm kidding, but that and some cash, and we may be on to something...
  10. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    I'm on it! :D
  11. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Thanks, Dr E! It's been a fun journey, and I have a LOT if ideas to tackle still. Life is good!

    Yes, I know about the heavy metals being liberated during welding the nasty galvanised coating, but thank you for reminding me, and for bringing it up for those who don't know.

    I generally have the exhaust fans running full blast and have the door open. I also pretend to be a deep sea diver running out of oxygen. :lol3 I take a deep breath, weld a stringer w/o breathing, then book out of the garage for 5-10 minutes until the smoke clears.
  12. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    I find myself another quiet project while all the little sleepyheads are slumbering away upstairs...

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    I cut all the oil from drilling with some Pre-Kleeno. Then I use some XO-15 Machinery Gray. I've never heard of this brand before, but figured I'd try it out for $10 a qt.

    [​IMG]

    The robot slippers have been beautified. Single coat coverage, no runs or sags, and it levels out well with no brush marks. Shoot yeah. That will work. I didn't even put a dent in the qt. This little can just may paint the entire project.

    Howzat, 100mpg? I didn't use flat black. :evil :rofl
  13. Dorzok

    Dorzok Long timer

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    Just tell everybody the extras are lightening holes to match yur tractor.
    :lol3
    sorry, couldn't resist. HEY! you get to finally use that thing to plow some snow?
  14. 9Dave

    9Dave Bazinga!

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    So with all of the discussion on the size and placement of welds, I dug out "The Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding" from the JF Lincoln Foundation. I bought it when I was there for my class. I know, I risk losing "guy points" by actually reading directions, but hey, they use this in their extended class, so I figured there must be some good information in here somewhere. :evil

    In designing a full strength joint, both weld placement and size are variables to deal with. They have this handy table of recommended weld sizes

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    and this one to describe what the finished weld, the "w" variable looks like

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    There is all sorts of discussions of cost/benefit of bevel joints vs. fillet welds, etc. - but we are basically dealing with fillet welds here.

    So what it says, is that assuming you are getting adequate penetration, and with the 3/16 material you are using for the outer tubes, "w" should equal 1/8", since it is at the minimum. They key is that you are achieving full penetration, which you think you are.

    There is a lengthy discussion of designing welds where they talk about overwelding and cost/benefit. Basically, the cost is that you are using too much filler metal, and the there is no additional benefit since you have achieved the desired strength.

    For me of course, more is better :D, and since I am working on small projects, and have huge spools of wire, I don't care about the excess cost. If I were designing and building commercial projects, then I would care because I would be losing money if there was more material being used than required to meet the design specifications.
  15. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    You might not want to do that. You would waste hours and hours on that site with all the tool and garrage nuts!


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    Jim :brow
  16. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Interesting info! Well, I think I am getting good penetration. I guess I'll find out pretty soon...
  17. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Yeah, I'm surprised I get anything done just being on here! I found a site called jalopy journal? or something like that when searching "homemade gantry". I found a thread 80 or so pages long with nothing but homemade tools. I need to wade back through that when I make time! Very talented individuals out there.
  18. 100mpg

    100mpg Self Imposed Exile

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    :happay:happay:happay
    :lol3 Well, I believe there is hope for the color challenged after all! It looks great.
  19. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Still waiting on wheels to figure out lower leg support, so I do what still needs done...

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    I-beam cut to desired length with a port-a-band. Ends dressed up with the grinder. This weighs right around 140 lbs if my math is right. The whole I-beam gets the rust knocked down with a 40 grit flap wheel, then I use Pre-Kleeno to wipe off all the crud. This old beam was pretty grungy.

    [​IMG]

    Then I brush on some more enamel. I'm liking this paint so far. I've only used about an inch out of a quart can.

    Young guys, don't get old. This is what you can look forward to. Being excited about a fresh painted I-beam. :D I'll be playing in the toilet before long.


    The next time a buddy tells me about a vintage bike restoration, or a cool car rebuild, I'll just say "this one time I restored an I-BEAM! Ooooooooooh!" :rofl
  20. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    No luck on playing in the snow yet. Just sloppy, wet, heavy mess less than 3" deep. More on the way tomorrow night. I was just telling my dad today that if I don't get to play in the snow this year, the tractor may go bye-bye to get my hands on a quality lathe and some tooling. Ghetto ecomonics may strike again soon. :evil