Rookie wanna-be weldor starting to make some cool things!

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by kirkster70, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
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    Long time no post.

    I hope everyone had a great Christmas and New Year's Day!

    I'm finally making forward progress once again...

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    The JD Squared Model 32 finally shows up. I bought the bender from an ebay vendor, and 5/8" DOM, 2 1/4" centerline dies from another ebay vendor. I chose the mechanical version because it's about 25% of the cost of the full hydraulic setup, and I don't need hydraulics for bending 5/8" tube. The extension handle is reversed in the ratchet arm for storage in the above shot.

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    I made the above shown bracket to bolt onto the bending arm. You do not use the ratchet mechanism at all on 5/8" tube, and the instructions say to wedge the extension handle in the end 2) 3/4" bolts to bend small tube. Personally, I thought that was a bit cheesy, so that's why I made the bracket. Now the handle can attach to either arm with a spring pin and still store in the other arm when not in use.

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    Above: I made the pedestal mount with narrow 1/4" plate, and the scrap from what I cut out of the end of the base from the wheelchair / low buck bike lift. Not the prettiest thing in the world, but form should always follow function. I don't like wasting things in case you couldn't already tell. You can see where I tacked the 1/4" plate first so I could drill mounting holes in the drillpress. Then I welded a full bead around the square tube. I was going to box the ends of the square tube with plate, but the open hole is great for tweaking a bend on small tube if a degree or two over or under bent.

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    I tried buying mild steel, 5/8" DOM, .065 wall tube locally, but nobody stocks it. The guy told me he could order it, but so can I. I should have called first and just paid over the phone. Next time, that's what I'll do. I ordered some tube on ebay.

    While waiting on tube, the above photo shows a scrap shelf that came from a rack that was destined for the dump. It's fairly heavy 18 ga. mild steel. My sis-in-law wanted me to haul the rack to the dump, but surprise, surprise, it goes in my scrap bin. I have 7 shelves this size, and about 40 feet of small angle after disassembling everything.

    I broke out the plasma cutter and cut off the factory bent flanges. What you see on the floor is scrap left from one shelf after making the next photo...

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    Deeze! I was going to buy a sheet of aluminum, but why? This was FREE!!! I made them a bit smaller than the bags on the KLR and used the same process shown pages earlier. It took one shelf to make each bag. I still need to make the lids. The latch hardware just showed up. (ebay)

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    I just did a series of tack welds upon one another similar to the TIG process.

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    Above: inside corner penetration. Much, much easier to weld than aluminum. My final dimensions are 8" deep, 16" wide, and 14" tall.

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    The tubing finally shows up after 2 weeks of waiting. I bought it in 3' lengths, which wasn't a big concern to me with the small scale job. I bought 21' and shipped was a bit over $40. Again, I will plan ahead and buy locally next time. No biggie.

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    I made the hoops 14" wide x 10" tall. Figuring the take up and gain on the bender was easy. I measured the overall length of the tube first. Then I loaded a piece of tube into the die and tightened the setscrew with the tube at the very end of the die. I then made a stub 90. Take the tube out of the bender, measure the stub and the leg of the 90. Add both measurements. Deduct the original length from the combined stub and leg figure. This is your gain. The takeup (the length needed for a 90) is the stub length - just make sure to line the tube up in the same place every time. After making the very first 90, I had all the info needed to make a back-to-back 90 to the exact size I needed. Luckily, all my "learnin' " from bending electrical conduit transferred to tube bending. I figured it would be pretty much the same, and it is.

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    The JD2 made some pretty, wrinkle free bands. Overkill for 5/8", I know, but this bender will get some heavier use in the future.
    I'm already looking at 1 3/4" dies for a possible sidehack project.

    So that's it for now. I'll take some more progress photos later when I start fabbing the rack mounts.

    Until next time...
  2. zgfiredude

    zgfiredude Old Fart in Training.......

    Joined:
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    Glad to see the progress continues! Nice work and terrific reading! :freaky
  3. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Location:
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    Thank you very much!

    Just remember that I am a rookie as the title correctly says, so I'm trying to post from a beginning perspective.

    I've been asking a bunch of questions in other threads, and I've been receiving excellent info. from others to get this far.

    I'm always open to criticism from those in the know. If anyone sees me screwing up, please keep me straight!

    And those with zero experience welding as I once had, you can see it's about as hard as baking a cake. Follow the directions and it usually works out well.

    More pics to follow...
  4. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

    Joined:
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    My kids like riding with me, so I always want the rear pegs functional and not blocked by the bags. With that in mind, I tape a boot in place for measuring purposes.

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    I plumb off the heel of the boot and stick another piece of tape on the bike.

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    I measure over an inch for clearance to the bag, then another inch to the edge of the hoop.

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    I mark where I want the top of the hoop with yet more tape, then hold the hoop in place while eyeballing a measurement. I bend a stub 90, and cut both ends where I need it to be. This pic shows everything already tacked together.

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    The above pic shows drilling the tube for a "fish mouth" to make a solid joint.

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    The bottom mount is a chrome spacer I had left from a chopper I built several years ago. I ground off the chrome and drilled out the inside to accept an allen bolt.

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    L side complete.

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    Once one side is complete, the other side is a snap. Measure off what you did on the other side. The above pic shows a segment bend I made to match the contour of the R plastic.

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    Using a straight edge to line up the tab for the rear support.

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    Both tabs tacked in place.

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    Using a carpentry tool used to duplicate angles.

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    Transferring the angle to the tube by eyeballing it.

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    Rear support notched and tacked in place.

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    Mock-up complete. Now I need to disassemble and final weld everything, and shape the tabs better.

    Buying in 3' lengths wasn't as wasteful as I thought. I have 2) full 3' pieces left, and a piece over 2' left. So I guess I used about 16' total.

    More to follow when I have something to show.
  5. hilld

    hilld riding isn't an addiction

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    Great work. Guess you are a "pastry chef" now. :D
  6. Motornoggin

    Motornoggin Two-Bit Throttle Bum

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    Nice job on the metal shop and all the cool projects!
  7. Poolside

    Poolside Syndicated

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    <BR>
    You saved yourself a trip to the dump too! Reuse is the name of the game.

    Nice work on the rack and boxes.


    <BR>
  8. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Looking great! You are making me want to get out and do more!

    Jim :brow
  9. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Location:
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    Thanks guys!

    More progress on the DR350S racks...

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    Exterior welds blended, tabs rounded, and 3/16" x 1 1/2" flat bar cut 6" long and welded in the rear for ebay mounting knobs. (3/8" nuts tacked behind the flat bar)

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    The whole rack weighs just under 7lbs. That's 10lbs. lighter than the KLR rack out of 1" square tube. Go figure. :lol3

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    Again, everything is spraybombed with 3 coats of rustoleum industrial grade semi-gloss black enamel.

    Now I'm just waiting on ebayed mirrors and rear signals to put her on the road.

    If I have time, I'll start back on the bags tomorrow. I'm going to spray bomb them black as well.

    Until next time...
  10. RC3094

    RC3094 Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Northern Virginia - land of inattentive drivers
    I like the use of multiple hardware grades...a true backyard handyman utilizing what's at his disposal...:clap
    I only bring it up 'cauze I've done the same myself...:lol3
  11. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Yep! Ha Ha!

    Looks like a grade 3, 5, and 8! Good eye!!

    I've got buckets full of crap from hoarding disassembled parts.

    Believe it or not, I think the grade 3 bolt came from a Honda generator that I recently stripped down. I've never seen SAE hardware on a Honda.


    You're supposed to be marvelling at how close I tacked those two pieces of plate together. Ha Ha!
  12. RC3094

    RC3094 Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Northern Virginia - land of inattentive drivers
    yep, I've got 5 gallon buckets full of hardware from old switchgear tear outs.

    GE, Pringle, Siemens from back in the day all used top notch gold chromate grade 5 or 8 bolts, nuts, locks, flats and belleville washers.

    None of it's any good for bikes or newer cars but for plain old fabrication they save having to go to the hardware store...
  13. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Lust for dust.

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    Rookie, my ass. Inspiring DIY stuff. Looking forward to the panniers.
  14. french horn

    french horn Just Add venture

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    As usual, great work ... but I must mention: the baseplate for the bender stand has beautifully square corners and edges = not good for bare feet. I have a tendency to round off the corners and bevel or round the edges, just in case I do a bit without my boots on (most of the time :D). I also have other people in my shed from time to time. Just a thought ... keep up the great work mate.
    :clap:clap:clap
  15. hilld

    hilld riding isn't an addiction

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    Portland, OR - raingear or web feet required
    If you are wearing bare feet in a shop you are asking for trouble. Gotta use common sense. :D
  16. Dorzok

    Dorzok Long timer

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    i don't know anything so i'm just asking. is that upper mount going to support anything?
  17. french horn

    french horn Just Add venture

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    Heeeyyy .. gimmy a break willyu? .... I'm an Aussie ... we do things a little different down here. :lol3:lol3:lol3
    Can't tell yu how many times I got hot spatter between my toes .. but not wanting to ugly-up my run ... just keep welding ... dancing can come later .. :rilla:kurt:lol3
  18. kubiak

    kubiak Long timer

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    madera california
    im the same way over here in california. i weld in my flipflops and jump around when i get slag on my feet. also all my socks have holes from welding too!
  19. french horn

    french horn Just Add venture

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Bundaberg Qld. Australia

    +1 ^

    who need common sense when you've got cast iron feet ..:rofl ... but I'd still trim that base-plate :wink:
  20. scooteraug02

    scooteraug02 Dog Rancher

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    Location:
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    My friend is a good welder and when looking for material for a project I looked up fabrication shops in the area. The one I went to had dumpsters full of "junk" to them that was just what I needed. You guys should check some fabrication shops for cheap materials.

    The owner was implying I could learn to weld for him if I wanted.

    Lincoln Electric has some week long courses if you can spare the time.
    http://lincolnelectric.com/knowledge/training/weldschool/courses.asp

    Also there is this thread.
    Ask your WELDING questions here.

    How to (almost) kill yourself with brake cleaner

    Homemade aluminium panniers