Round the World - Do you have beer we are coming to visit?

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by michnus, Jun 11, 2011.

  1. Tom-Traveller

    Tom-Traveller Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Switzerland, near the border to the BlackForest
    Hi

    so, you guys are having a break ....

    Is the borders to Syria closed? My wife and I left our bikes at Wim's n Ethiopia and will go back in Sept Oct to go on to try and make Turkey or Euro. But if you say there's a problem with the ferries or boat then going around Syria way will be the only way.

    Did you ask on HorizonsUnlimted maybe some others have answers?

    Are you coming through Switzerland anytime ?

    There is always a guest room and cold beer in the fridge for any overlander, RTW, Transafrica, etc. :freaky

    our location
    http://maps.google.de/maps?hl=de&su...esult&ct=title&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CBgQ8gEwAA

    Good Luck and happy trails
    Thomas & Andrea

    www.miles-to-ride.com


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    #21
  2. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,373
    Location:
    South Africa
    ANGOLA- CERVEJA OBRIGADO!

    You only have to know these two words to have locals crack a broad smile and even hard ass police officials won&#8217;t be able to keep a straight face. Beer and Thank You are the Portuguese words you need to know when visiting Angola.

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    MILE MARKER

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    The last time I visited Angola was with Metaljockey more an off road ride, this time round it is to show Elsebie, Harold and Linda this wonderful country and to try and mix it up with some of the locals. Angola and it's people really have a way of creeping into your heart.


    After years of war and unrest these people want to go on with their life's and make something for themselves.

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    ROAD SIDE BEER STOP

    But Angola is a fickle mistress! This time she gave me a hard time coming close. Let me give you the absurd before I get to the good stuff. We were supposed to enter Angola at Ruacana border post but the more we talked to the locals at Ruacana that used the route to Cahama, the more we were advised to stay away and use the main border.
    It&#8217;s the rainy season and the roads are so bad that we won&#8217;t be able to get to Cahama in a day. Despondent, we decided to crossed at Oshikango, the only major border between Angola and Namibia. Major bloody mistake!!!!!!


    We gave the Angola embassy in SA the &#8220;Letters of invitation &#8220;Jose our friend in Angola sends to us for the issue of the visa. Now these numb skulls at the border wanted a copy of it! How in hell must we get them now!? They only issue the visa on having this letter, why does this numbskull now also want to see it while he sit with the visa in his hands?

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    MANY RUSTED UP WAR RELICS NEXT TO THE ROAD.

    We tried to explain but the officials, who could quote from their system the name of the person who issued our invitation, but still they would have none of us. In the end a local fixer sitting behind us under the tree said he will go fetch the fax on the Namibian side at the local bank. Thanks to Moses, who helped us the rest of the way, his fee of about US$40 and 6 hours later we entered Angola!

    The border officials also did not know what a Carne-de-passage is, nor an International driver&#8217;s license and topped it off by telling Linda not to sit on a bench that is under the tree as it is only for officials!


    This fickle mistress Angola had my blood pressure at boiling point and it was also bloody 40C outside. Angola is not a tourist friendly country. The bureaucracy is mind boggling and the communism shows through now and then. Sounds stupid but that is why we are drawn to these countries, a lot less rules and still not besiege by tourist, you get to taste the local flavour of the country. It is damn expensive to stay in lodges or hotels and restaurants are equally expensive, at least beer and petrol are cheaper than in SA.

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    Our destination was Lubango the place of Jose the man that fought against us South Africans in the border war in the 80's and the man that entertained us 3 years ago on our Foz du Cunene trip. We were greeted by Jose at his restaurant (under renovations currently) with a huge smile although he only placed me about two days later due to the long hair. We were planning a trip to Namibe for a stay over, instead Jose would have none of that.

    He escorted us to Namibe for a day trip and that evening arranged a braai and entertainment by the old band that performed for us on our previous trip. Josef the Louis Armstrong look-a-like wood saw artist.


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    THE TRUCK IS NOT PHOTOSHOP INTO THE PICTURE, LINDA AND HAROLD IS BUSY PASSING HIM. WHICH WAS THE MAIN ROAD IS NOW UN DRIVE-ABLE BY CARS AND TRUCKS THEY REVERT TO DRIVING NEXT TO THE ROAD.

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    I HELPED THIS MAN, HE ASKED ME TO BORROW HIM A JACK, YE, FOR SURE WE CARRY CAR JACKS WITH US ON BIKES! PLUGGED AND PUMPED HIS TYRE WITH SOME WORMS HE HAD 4 DIFFERENT HOLES AROUND THE TYRE, PUMPED IT AND HE WAS ON HIS WAY. MILES FROM ANYTHING WITH NO MEANS OF CHANGING A TYRE? JUST INSANE.

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    IF YOU DRIVE AROUND WITHOUT A SPARE AND A JACK THEN AT LEAST MAKE SURE YOU ASK THE MAN UP THERE FOR HELP. :D

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    FRIENDLY FACES

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    PLAY IT AGAIN SAM

    The generosity, warmth and friendliness of these Angolans know no bounds. We felt it everywhere we went. People do not look miserable and unhappy in fact they look quite content with their lives in this recovering country. Adults and kids wave to us, no stone throwing or outstretched hands&#8211; begging, so unlike the Himba's in Namibia and Lesotho kids. Maybe that is the trade mark of a tourist country versus a non-tourist country. They jump up and down with excitement when we wave back or stop for some photos.

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    BEER STOP

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    WE GOT TOLD LOVERS LIKE TO DEFACE BAOBAB TREES WITH THE GRAFFITI.

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    PIKIPIKI'S (small motorcycle) ROAD SIDE REPAIRS. SKILL FULL PEOPLE THIS, NOTHING IS A PROBLEM.

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    COLOURFUL HOUSES

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    MORNING COFFEE AT JOSE'S PLACE WE STAYED IN LUBANGO.

    Angola also features jaw-drop beautiful landscapes and now in summer it&#8217;s even more so. You can go from tropical to desert in 170km and the sea water temperature at Namibe is close to 25 degrees. I understand why so many people immigrate to this country even though it&#8217;s is hell hard to do business in Angola, even the locals have a saying &#8220;nothing in Angola is easy&#8221;.
    #22
  3. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,373
    Location:
    South Africa
    Jose, our host since our first time in Angola was very persistent the day before.We had to do a separate trip to Namibe with the bikes. Obviously we were not in the mood to ride the 300km round trip to Namibe in two days. One thing that was a bit of a refresher on this suggestion were that we were going to be able spend some time at the famous Leba pass.

    We left our luggage at the house and set off with Jose and his wife on his Varadero. There's quite a bike following in Lubango and they often have races in Lubango.

    We set off with Jose in the lead first stop Leba pass. I can not say why I like Leba pass so much. Maybe it is because it goes back to army time, I don't know, maybe the mystery around it from that time. It's such a great feeling standing on the opposite side of the pass taking in the jaw drop beauty of the place.
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    Second time this Dakar get the pleasure of riding Leba

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    View from the top of Leba pass with the road meandering down to Namibe in the distance

    At the bottom of Leba pass there's a row of small stall selling food stuff. The lot sell the same stuff, at the same price. Jose spoiled us with his favourite, chicken stomachs and hearts, a bit on the tough side but very tasty.

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    Local Pikipiki's

    We left to meet up with Jose's friends in Namibe at the beach front. It's a happening spot with Portuguese elders sitting around sea facing restaurants drinking espresso and grappa the entire Sunday. We met a fisherman that's been in Namibe for 20 odd years and owns the only Harley in the town. It's well looked after bike and it's evident the man loves his Harley more than his kids.
    The food at these cafe's are the best, fish and chips or local lobster.

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    Yes it's dead Harry!
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    The reason we came to Angola was for my wife to also experience some of the fun we had on this trip. Angola, it's not like they said And here we were treated to the same hospitality we had from the guys at our previous trip.
    That evening it was party time at Jose's place with all his friends and their band that got together to play for us. It went on till 3 that morning. The band played anything from Abba to Creedence Clearwater. These people know how to party properly. Their warm hearted friendship was unbelievable we were treated as if we were part of the family for years.

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    We meet again after 3 years

    The next day it was back to Namibe to Jose's beach house. The road took us about 20km North of Namibe. We had to turn off well before the town onto a real shit road. It's a desert waste land and gave the idea of a small Fish river canyon. Unbelievably beautiful vistas.
    The riding in the desert was mind blowing, well for me, Linda struggled a bit but took it well and kept her head high. It was difficult for her in the sand but this woman's heart is in the right place for riding. *
    The tracks run all over the place, and then come together again in a sand track just to split off again into several directions.

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    Fooling around in the desert.

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    Linda had a bit of a hard time, but she came out head high!

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    Jose's beach house....eeerrmm, shack more that you can call a house.

    Bias dos Pipas, Namibe is where the beach party will be. It&#8217;s a colourful small little community that resembles Hentie&#8217;s Bay (no shops though). Funny the water is hot but it is next to a desert, I always thought warm coastal water ensures a tropical landscape.

    We spend the day with Jose and his family, they are a lively active bunch. Jose and his family left at about 8pm for Lubango but we stayed behind to enjoy a night on the beach. How many places can you still park your bike on the beach and sleep there without a worry in the world. This place is a paradise, in fact, worth dealing with some of the bureaucratic nonsense, this country offers maybe even more free living than South Africa.
    You can trust on Angola to get some tough chicken and we were not disappointed the chicken were tough but tasty, the chips as always good.
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    We went on till late that night finishing off the Carlsberg's they left us. Sorting out Africa's problems is hard work.

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    The morning after!

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    We met up with Agusto in Namibe the next day, he is a friend of Jose and a 40year old fisherman who owns fishing boats with his dad and to our surprise rides a Harley he bought into Angola with him 20 years ago. He was waiting for 4 of his friends from Portugal. They shipped their bikes from Portugal to Mozambique and then rode all the way to Angola and will be shipping the bikes back to Portugal again. They were apparently inspired by our previous trip report written by Metaljockey (Erik) One of them has never ridden a bike and not to miss out on this epic expedition decided to try it on a quad.

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    Agusto invited us to his parents&#8217; house for a local fish braai. This is the strangest darn thing, and maybe it&#8217;s because dual purpose riders are sort of cut from the same cloth. Yes, yes it&#8217;s a generalisation but to date all these bike riders we have come to meet have become friends of Elsebie and me. These guys felt like my friends from school I have seen 20 years ago, not as complete strangers that only met 30 mins ago.

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    Having lunch at Agusto's parents place.

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    Our new friends!

    I love this and I know I will see them again in the near future even if we have to fly to Portugal or them to SA. This is what it is all about, meeting people making friends and seeing new places&#8230;&#8230;&#8230;.life is great!

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    Spoiling ourselves with a night in a banda on the beach.

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    Heavily protected missile site in Namibe *:imaposer:

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    Zooom in
    On the outskirts of Namibe and barely 1km out of town we saw these missiles pointing south towards SA, as per urban legend. The local story is some of the missiles are pointing towards the USA and others to SA but for some reason I doubt when they hit the button these missiles will go further than the town&#8217;s municipal border.

    This is even more bizarre than the Custom procedures. I rode up to the gate where the officials sat and asked whether it is possible for me to take pictures of the awesome fire power&#8230;&#8230;&#8230;noa, NOA!! No,no, they said. ​
    #23
  4. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    South Africa
    Hello Thomas and Andrea

    Thanks so much for the offer we will definitively try and take you up on it. We heading back to Ethiopia in Sept/Oct and will try and make Euro by December.

    I did ask on HU but not much, at this stage it is not a huge problem, will sort it as we go.

    PS: Love your site ;)
    #24
  5. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    To get back to the missile story. Nobody knows whether the missiles are in fact real or not or maybe the Angola government just bullshits everybody in thinking they are still a force to be reckon with.
    I can walk in there at night and take one as a souvenir. Stupid, absolutely bloody stupid. It might be a prank to fool Google earth to pick up on it and scare the USA with their awesome firepower. Whatever the reason I hope for the inhabitants of Namibe those old rusted missiles have been disarmed.

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    TIME WAS RUNNNG OUT IN ANGOLA, NEEDED TO MOVE ON

    Angola provided us with a wonderful time. We will go back in the future. Agusto and I have decided to try and ride from Tombua to Foz du Cunene and back on the small bikes the locals use as transport, might make for an interesting trip. Up north from Namibe it is a riding heaven that needs to be explored.
    That plan is for another day in the future. For now it was time to head back to Lubango say good bye to Jose and his family and head back to Namibia.

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    EERIE GHOST TREE IN A RIVERBED. STRANGE AS IT'S THE ONLY ONE AROUND LOOKING LIKE THIS.

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    ANOTHER FUNNY TREE GROWING IN THE DESERT NEAR NAMIBE.

    On our way back to Lubango we stopped at the Dorsland trekker memorial. You only really understand what this people went through to get there in that time. They had no roads and the terrain is anything but simple. It was not your average sissy paper pusher that can do this kind of trek.
    It must have been extremely difficult for these people to have trek up to Angola from South Africa.
    I am humbled.

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    DORSLAND TREKKER MEMORIAL WITH THEIR GRAVES IN THE FOREGROUND.

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    LUBANGO IS A HUGE BUZZING CITY.

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    A MUST STOP IN LUBANGO, THE CHRIST STATUE OVERLOOKING LUBANGO

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    ANGOLAN WAR RUIN

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    ARCHITECTURE IS MOSTLY PORTUGUESE INFLUENCE AND THEY LOVE USING VIBRANT COLOURS. *

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    LIVE IS GOOD IN ANGOLA, OVERALL T'S GOING OKAY FOR ANGOLAN'S

    We said our farewells in Lubango and head back towards Namibia. Camping spots in Angola is non existent, camping next to the road is the way to go and actually a load better than staying in crappy hotels at 5star prices. We never had problem camping next to the road as long as you stay well away from big settlements.
    Eating at shops next to the road is cheap and the food although not gourmet stuff still good and big enough portions to fill even a big hunger.

    The best is beers are available everywhere even remote places stock beers. *

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    THERE'S A DEPOSIT ON BEER BOTTLES AND THE LOCALS DO NOT LIKE US TAKING AWAY THE BOTTLES. BEST OPTION WAS TO EMPTY THEM INTO A BLADDER..........HUGE MISTAKE!

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    WILLEM, LOCAL ELDER WE CAMPED NEAR HIS HOUSE, OUT OF RESPECT WE ASKED HIM FOR PERMISSION, HE EVEN SPOKE A BIT OF AFRIKAANS.

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    Last night in Angola and we camped under huge Baobab trees. We had enough beer and whiskey and it end up in a hellova party.

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    NO STOP WITH ANGOLAN BEERS, NGOLA IS NOT YOUR AVERAGE BEER, YOU DRINK YOURSELF OUT OF YOUR CLOTHES.
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    Angola was a blast, making new friends, thrills and spills, we had it all. I will forever remember the good memories of this trip into Angola.

    For now it was time to head to Zambia..
    #25
  6. bigdon

    bigdon Long timer

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    2,701
    Thanks for the report Michnus, I'm N ! :freaky
    #26
  7. Tom-Traveller

    Tom-Traveller Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Switzerland, near the border to the BlackForest
    Thanks for sharing your experiences, seems like Angola is a nice place to travel ..... we will keep it in mind

    :rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl

    waiting for more ......

    Greets Thomas & Andrea
    #27
  8. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    1,373
    Location:
    South Africa
    Namibia Caprivi ​


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    Back into Namibia from Angola we headed along the border towards the Caprivi strip. Harold and Linda decided to ride back from Oshakati via Tsumeb and then Rundu. For Elsebie and myself sitting on tar that much after all the stunning dirt roads we have done it was pure torture.

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    Sun down in the Caprivi after the rainsi

    We headed East towards Rundu and would meet up with Harold and Linda near Pupa falls. The diversity in Namibia is mind blowing, there's deserts, grass lands, Damaraland and the Caprivi which offers some off the most beautiful sunsets and abundant wild life you can imagine.

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    SOME MEAN ASS FLIES ROAMING AROUND THE CAPRIVI
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    Life is great especially wen it is raining in the Caprivi


    Tracks4Africa listed some community camp sites which were all empty. We stayed at one just before entering the Caprivi strip. Cost us about nothing, was safe and had a cold shower and clean toilet. Camping at these places always offers that bit more and is a bit more special to stay over with them. Most of the times you can have a good chat to the locals and sit and enjoy a beer with them. They just love to talk to these funny travelers.

    The old Pupa falls campsite is now a run down dump. Luckily next to them other private lodges with really cool campsites have open up and offer cold beers and even a workshop to work on a BMW. Pity these lodges got such difficult names, Tuna Mutambura lodge.

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    Camping in Namibia the best in the world!

    We spend two night there relaxing, and I had to fix the Dakar's steering head bearings for the first time. The lodge owner was really helpful and gave me space behind his workshop and some tools too fix the bearings.
    For the rest it's easy to find peace here, sitting on the deck for hours watching the hippo's drift past and see how the sun die slowly over the horizon in a deep red glow.

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    The last night there we over indulged on the wine a bit, luckily our new destination was only 300km away at Mazambala island lodge. We raced there, it was damn hot and the thought of more beers and relaxation next to a river and a pool was just what was needed.

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    We had to pack in the luxury camping while we can, from Zambia going up, camping and nice to haves will be a thing of the past.

    This is one stunning lodge, you camp next to the river and the lodge is on a island. They use boats to ferry people to and fro. We were lucky it was out of season as we had the campsite to our selves.
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    Super long water flower thingamajick

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    This feels the same as the Everglades in Florida

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    Time was running out for Namibia, Zambia was next. ​
    #28
  9. Tom-Traveller

    Tom-Traveller Adventurer

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    #29
  10. kktos

    kktos on a bright side of life

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    :norton
    good one :):)

    funny, Michnus.... but I'm sure we stopped at the very same spot :
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    I even managed to write down our names on the sand :eek:D

    keep going mate, please ! ;)
    #30
  11. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    KKos I think that part is somewhere on the road up Damaraland, I can't remember exactly. Namibia sure is one hellova special place.
    #31
  12. kktos

    kktos on a bright side of life

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    that's correct ;) Going north towards Palmwag ;)
    #32
  13. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    Murphy you bloody basted! PART1

    They say when things go too well, Murphy will end it soon enough. Much did we know that when entering Zambia from Katimo Mulilo Namibia border post.

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    ZAMBIA BORDER POST

    It's a small border post and things went quick on the Namibian side. However the Zambian side was a laugh a minute. Chaos and run down dirty buildings with hordes of people standing around. Everything paid we were out of pocket around 100USD for all the stupid taxes the Zambian charge. The one tax was payable in a old caravan wreck that had no seats and only a box and table for the man to write down the stuff.

    Then if that was not bad enough, his stamp was warn down and the ink pad was dry, eventually I made him lick the stamp to get something visible on his tax paper.

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    FAWLTY TOWERS BACKPACKERS IS THE ONLY PLACE TO STAY IN LIVINGSTON.


    We ended up at Faulty Towers backpackers in Livingston the small town close to the famous Victoria water falls, a vibrant hip happening spot. Across the road from Faulty Towers in the main road on the way to the falls is a restaurant The Spot.
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    The owners are a South African born woman and a Zambian woman, they make the best Piri-Piri chicken in Africa and at very reasonable prices. They will also make you any local dishes if arranged before the time. They really are a friendly bunch of people.

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    FOOD IS EVERYWHERE AND CHEAP

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    IMPORTANT THINGS FIRST

    The idea was to head for Kariba Lake and take the dirt roads that run along the lake up to Siavonga. We knew they had plenty of rain but thought we would go that way and if stuck just turn around and take the tar road up to Lusaka. *None of the Livingston folk could give us any indication what the roads along this stretch were like.

    Livingston is a best experienced for two or more days. It's a small happening town with friendly folke and a busy town centre. Famous name hard liquor cost on average 30% cheaper than is SA. Obviously we stock up on Johnny Walker Black and other expensive stuff we normally don't indulge in when in SA.
    There's quite a few private game reserves around Livingston that offer camping for cheap.

    When at the falls on the Zambia side you can ask the customs police at the bridge to walk over to the Zimbabwe side to get a look over the falls from that side.

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    FAMOUS VICOTRIA FALLS

    Harold and Linda did not feel up to dirt at that stage and set off for Siavonga via the main road, we would meet up again in a day or two. *As we rounded a bend on our way to Kariba Lake near a small town called Sinazeze, Elsebie&#8217;s bike suddenly became a low rider. *The top shock bolt sheared off and the shock moved out of its bracket and, well &#8230;&#8230;&#8230;&#8230;&#8230;&#8230;&#8230; the top part of the shock broke off dropping all the oil on the tarmac.

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    SHIT HAPPENS SHOCK TOP BOLT SHEARED OFF.

    As we were standing there still trying to make plans how to get the bike to Lusaka or Livingstone an ex South African farmer pulled up next to us offering some help. He farms for Zambeef close to where we got stranded.

    He immediately phoned his workshop manager, Servaas, to come and collect the bike and take it to their workshops. From there their farm compound was 12KM further located next to the lake. We could stay there and try figure out how to get the bike going again.

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    RELAXING NEXT TO KARIBA

    The entire compound consisted of ex South Africans working for Zambeef, according to them, Zambia is South Africa 20 years ago with regards to ease of living. Everybody is safe and crime is virtually zero. A beautiful spot with very generous people.
    That evening we were invited to a braai with the farmers, that turned into a party that lasted well into the early hours of the morning.

    They say booze don't solve your problems, it sure as hell helped with the shit feeling I was sitting with. The entire night I was mulling it over how to get this bike out of there and the bloody time it is going to set us back with. The only thing I could do was to get the shock out the next morning and see if there's any thing I can do to get us out of the place.

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    WE LOVED EATING AT THESE FOOD STALLS, CHEAP AND TASTY

    The biggest problem was the farm is so remote, it's nearly 400km back to Livingston and 450km to Lusaka. The previous day when we offloaded the bike the spring unhook and the bike stood as if everything was okay.
    We decided to pack up greed the friendly farmers and try and ride the bike as is to Lusaka. As long as the spring work we will be fine. At this stage I still did not know what exactly broke.

    Elsebie insisted on riding her own bike and like on a pogo stick unceremoniously hopped her way as we road on to Lusaka.
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    FIXING THE DAKAR'S SHOCK

    I got hold of Kurt our friend in South Africa and he was able to get us a new (2nd hand) shock flown into Lusaka within the next few days. We ended up in Lusaka at Chachacha backpackers.

    As we rode into the grounds Neill aka Jenson Button was sitting on the floor with a despondent look on his face motorcycle tube in one hand and a knife in the other contemplating cutting it up as a liner for his front tyre. Nice surprise to see him and the XT made it so far. Fuck it mate, lets drink beer and then I will help you sort it out.

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    CHRISTMAS CAMPING AT CHA CHA BACKPACKERS IN LUSAKA

    There&#8217;s not much to be said about Lusaka it&#8217;s a big busy African city. The big South African companies are all represented there together with China taking over with big gusto. ​


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    #33
  14. Catalyst

    Catalyst Explorer

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    Augusta, GA
    Bad luck, but Zambia sounds great! How about part II?
    #34
  15. Gate

    Gate n00b

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8
    Location:
    BrĂ¥t City, Sweden
    Awesome trip! Cant wait till next post =)

    Good Luck!
    #35
  16. Tom-Traveller

    Tom-Traveller Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    90
    Location:
    Switzerland, near the border to the BlackForest
    #36
  17. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,373
    Location:
    South Africa
    Murphy you basted! Part2

    It was just after Christmas and Cha Cha Backpackers was overflowing with an unsavory dodgy bunch of Indian travelers, coughing, belching and convulsing to such an extend that the entire camp were up early at 4am. Harold as the passive one nearly got physical with one of them just before sunrise. It was the funniest thing to see this normally calm pacifist lose his temper that bad. He eventually also had to crack a smile at the situation.
    There are better places to stay in Lusaka, we just had to stay there due to the spares we were waiting for.

    The owner of the backpackers maybe didn't understand what backpackers meant when he allowed an entire village with kids and elders to move in. In any case so you learn.

    We set out of Lusaka for the nearly 800km trip to Monkey Bay hopeful that the bikes are sorted and we will be able to hit the sandy beaches in two days&#8217; time.

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    CROSSING THE LUANGWA RIVER BRIDGE

    Unfortunately the basted Murphy had other ideas for us. I was still riding with the smell of fresh rain in my nostrils when my bike suddenly over heated and dumped hot radiator water all over my left leg. This was not the kind of engine trouble I was hoping we would have to deal with on this trip, and especially this early into the trip. Shocks, tyres, chains, but not over heating engines or similar problems that can potentiality stop a trip. Fuuuuck!!

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    BOYS SCOUT PEDDLING AFRICA TOP TO BOTTOM, THEY CONSUME BAGS OF RICE AND MAIZE PORRIDGE TO KEEP THEM GOING.

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    WE OFTEN MADE BEER STOP, THE HEAT AND HUMIDITY DEHYDRATED US QUITE QUICK .

    As a troubleshooting exercise we took out the thermostat, rode it and the red light came on, next swop out the heat sensors, nope, not that, red light comes one after 2km. Then only option that was left was to check the water pump, but for that we had to get to a place to stay. We had no choice but to tow the bike to the nearest town. *Just before Nyimbi we came past a motel that looked like a ghost place, hotel Baghdad came to mind.

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    MURPHY THE EVIL BASTARD HAD TO PLAY A TRICK ON US AGAIN

    Hotel Kacholola&#8217; owner George and his grandson Richard were so helpful. We were very great full for the cold beers, in a Paraffin fridge, and the clean rooms even without running water. *The place is run down but you will go far to get a more friendlier and helpful host.

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    HAVING ICE COLD BEERS IN A GHOST HOTEL, BROKEN BIKE CAN WAIT.

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    VIEW FROM OUR ROOMS
    The next morning Harold and myself got the surgery underway. I called Kurt a friend in South Africa his advice was a easy check, take the pump cover off and see if the impeller spin by hand, if so the waterpump gears are fucked.

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    ZAMBIA BIKE WORKSHOP.
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    The only clean place we could found was a dilapidated grass thatch that were used to be part of a veranda many moons ago. The view over the mountains from there was just jaw drop beautiful.
    It took us a bit of time to figure out what's what, eventually we got the clutch cover off and all the other bits. Our worst fear came true, the waterpump gears were stripped.

    At this point, I was really a bit down and out on the bikes, I so wanted the bikes to do this trip without issues. The Dakar's are suppose to be bullet proof bikes, I made sure the last few years that I got to know everything about the bikes and what needs to be looked at. It took me 3 weeks to prepare the bikes before the trip and make sure everything was looked after. My bike was on 40000km and never gave one problem.
    How I could have missed the the fact that the waterpump gears could fail was a mystery to me. Only now after the fact and lots of research the problem is more related to 2004 and 2005 year models and later.

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    CANDLE LIGHT DINNER AT HOTEL KACHOLOLA
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    ABOUT THE ONLY THING A GAS CANISTER IS USEFUL FOR

    What to do next? We had no spare gears, we had a waterpump kit but no gears. It was around 500km back to Lusaka, but we cant tow that far it will take us forever, and then we miss the Malawi new years party. We decided to try and get the bike to the border where Metaljockey can come and fetch us.

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    THESE WOMAN OVER CHARGED US!

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    GETTING MY ASS KICKED BY A BOY.

    We spend the rest of the day trying to find transport for the bike to the border, washing and cleaning stuff. We had a great time with all the locals, playing chess and just sit drinking beers. These rural towns are small gems, we left everything on the bikes at night, nothing gets lost or stolen.

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    FIVE STAR LIVING, NO REALLY THIS IS FUN

    It&#8217;s good to have good friends around. Metaljockey and Lindsay convinced another South African man, Sarel to borrow them his brand new VW Transporter to come and fetch us in Zambia. If not for that we would not have been able to get there in time for New Year&#8217;s, and both Lindsay and Metaljockey made considerable effort meeting us their.
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    FIRST TRY TO GET TO THE BORDER. LUCKILY METALJOCKEY MADE IT.

    We tried from our side to arrange a truck or van to get the bike to the border and have Metaljockey only drive to the border. As things go in Zambia it&#8217;s African time, and as the day pasted all prospects that we tried to arrange turned to nothing.
    At last after 5pm a local teacher arrived with his borrowed Chinese van we started loading the bike. As luck would have it, as we set off to get to the border which would have taken us till after nine that evening, Metaljockey called and said he has just cleared the border and will see us later the evening. We can then leave the next morning early for Malawi.

    Metaljockey had to lie at the border post to get the car through and took a huge risk if they found out it was not his car they could have confiscated the vehicle. But that is what lengths he will go to for a friends.


    With all the trouble our stay turned out to be an enjoyable time, we had a great experience with the locals and their heartwarming helpfulness.

    Malawi here we come!!!!!

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    #37
  18. Mugwest

    Mugwest .

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
    Oddometer:
    7,450
    Location:
    3rd Ring of Buzztopia
    I'm not clear, Michnus-- did Erik bring repair parts for the Dakar water pump to you? Maybe it's answered in next post


    You ZA lot are heroes, full stop. :thumb
    #38
  19. Katoom119

    Katoom119 Mmmm....Orange Kool-aid

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,837
    Location:
    Knoxville, TN
    Love the report. Clicked on it as I recognized your name from the Angola report.

    One thing I always wonder is how safe is it to camp in Africa? I understand that you need to stay away from larger towns, but what about the wildlife? Over here in America our understanding is that elephants will trample you and lions and hyenas will eat you overnight. I'm assuming that these animals are pretty much only found in wildlife parks now? I know in California it is not uncommon to be attacked by a mountain lion while running or hiking. Doesn't happen very often but it still does. That's why I was wondering about camping in Africa.
    #39
  20. bike fx

    bike fx Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    31
    Location:
    Vancouver , Canada
    Last update was 01/29/2012
    #40