route planning w/ gas stops

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by Intrigue_262000, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. feathered

    feathered Been here awhile

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    easier: pick the town/location, then type 'gas near XXXX', and it will find gas stations or almost anything else for you. You can also use zip codes.
    #21
  2. rlbowers03

    rlbowers03 Been here awhile

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    I've been hacking my way through MapQuest :(: as well as Google Maps :beccatrying to plan a trip from Idaho to Georgia. I don't want to end up between Gas stations out in the middle of WY because I was thinking "Just a few more miles. There just HAS to be a gas station soon."

    I tried this Gas Buddy site and BAM!!! :clap there it is. Perfect! :wings
    #22
  3. KoolBreeze

    KoolBreeze Been here awhile

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    incredible the number of issues concerning what should be a relatively straightforward goal...

    automated mapping of gas stations along an intended route. :evil

    seems like a basic question that stumped many.

    you would almost think this isn't the 21st century and we have smart phones and internets. :deal :clap

    of course as others pointed out... stations come and go (and any business for that matter)

    but this is dealing with fuel stations, a particular business which I would think to be elatively "regulated" and monitored by various agencies. I would also hope they keep tabs on stations "coming and going" and if they are storing fuel, open for business etc...

    I would also hope the data be public accessible (even if for a fee) and then plugged in to a route planning mapping program.

    similar to gasbuddy but also to select a variety of options... for instance:

    riding a vehicle from point A to point B, a distance of 1200 miles over a certain route with a few route variations thrown in for measure. then select a preferred set of brands (say Chevron, Texaco, Shell and then all others) OR other options such as one based on best price. the vehicle gets * average MPG and has * size tank with * typical range.

    now map it.

    and the result "should be" a relatively straightforward base upon which to ride. (of course carrying extra fuel for the one that blew up last night or got whipped out by a tornado etc is prudent planning)

    some would not prefer this.... and this is a "too each their own". so be it. but others (obviously) would enjoy this and I believe the demand is definitely there.

    ok so who's programming this up to an app?
    #23
  4. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Been here awhile

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    This is very true. In Wyoming in particular, you can find yourself out of gas if you "know" there's a gas station in the next town and then come to find out the gas station burned down or went out of business a few years ago.

    Gasbuddy is nice because it only shows stations that have been updated within the last 24 hours.

    Operating hours are important to know, particularly if you are traveling in Oregon, where all gas has to be pumped by an attendant (not kidding, it really is the law. Stupid, but it's the law.) That means there are no unattended gas pumps in OR and at least in the Eastern part of the state, towns can be few and far between. In 2012 the wife and I were traveling across Oregon and ran out of gas in our truck because the gas station in the town we passed through (where I was planning to fill up) closed about a half hour before we got there.
    #24
  5. KoolBreeze

    KoolBreeze Been here awhile

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    in my years I've run across these examples plenty of times... I only hope at some point technology in communications etc can let us look back on times like that as a lull in the wind is to current shipping. (also traveled around the world quite a bit on the seas. time marches on...)
    #25
  6. HighTechCoonass

    HighTechCoonass Living the Dream....

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    Garmin GPS app for your cell phone... no pre plan necessary for me.
    #26
  7. jared p

    jared p Adventurer

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    i always pre-route my trip on google maps and make gas stations destinations so i know i won't be running out along the trip, it's incredibly convenient.
    #27
  8. little foot

    little foot Scratch and Sniff

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    The way i look at fuel stops on the GSA is, when i stop just cause I want to I fill up. I never even come close to running out of gas.
    #28
  9. ihatemybike

    ihatemybike Been here awhile

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    I'm currently planning a trip from Chicago, IL to roughly Bellingham, WA. My bike has a roughly 70-75 mile range here at home, but probably worse in the mountains.

    The website www.gasbuddy.com has a what they call a Gas Price Heat Map, when zoomed in to the 2 miles scale or closer the heat map goes away and the individual station prices become visible. Setting the Time Limit to 96 hours will show you all stations that have recent activity and should be safe bets. Changing the Time Limit to All Stations shows locations that have been recorded in the past, yet have no current updates. In my research most of these stations are still open, but it would be wise to call the ones you think you will really be in need of using.
    http://www.gasbuddy.com/gb_gastemperaturemap.aspx
    #29
  10. buls4evr

    buls4evr No Marks....

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    So with that Husky out here in NM..... You would not make it up to Silver City on the CDR for instance without additional gas or a bigger tank. That distance is 88 miles of desert. Better get a big tank or a Rotopax/Kolpin set-up out here. You want to be able to go about 130 miles at least on a tank. The other problem is that gas stations have weird hours/days of operation and sometimes just go OOB. You just want to have plenty out here. That is why it is "adventure riding" and why we run big gas tanks.It is not like PA with stations everywhere.
    #30
  11. dch

    dch Rock Chalk

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    Get a Garmin, after you have gone about 150 mi. ( or whatever your mileage for approx. 3/4 of a tank is) push the find gas button. There are lots of stations out there you never see. You may have to alter your route slightly but you won't run out, trust me.
    #31
  12. cycleman2

    cycleman2 Been here awhile

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    I'm not into the App world, so I just use my trip meter and know the mileage I can get before the bike goes onto reserve. Seems to me that you know that already, so as others have suggested Streets & Trips may help some but it does get confused on back roads sometimes.

    If I'm planning a long trip, I take the time to ( yes I use Streets & Trips ) for some of it, road map and then google the location to see what's around and how recent the info is. Anything that looks sketchy I check out further. My BMW R1100R also had fairly short tank range and I had to get gas around every 120 miles, ( that when it would go onto reserve ) so I had to be careful in some areas as there where in excess of 100 miles between places to get gas, and this was on paved number highways in the US.

    In others words your wise to preplan, especially if you are going off the beaten track.
    #32
  13. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Been here awhile

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    Gasbuddy is good, but just remember that if you don't have WiFi or 3g internet service, you won't be able to access it. So the time to look at GasBuddy is not when you are by the side of the road looking for gas because you're almost out. The time to look at it is when you're stopped for gas at a gas station with WiFi or 3g so you can figure out where your next stop will be.

    Lots of places out West have no cell coverage at all, and there are even larger areas where there is cell coverage but it's voice only (can't even get your voice mail!) Verizon is the best I've seen for cell coverage but even it doesn't cover everything out West.
    #33