RTW with Noah on a KTM 690

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by RoninMoto, Apr 14, 2012.

  1. Schussboelie

    Schussboelie Been here awhile

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    I do it all the time over here in Belgium.
    No point in riding a motorcycle in the rain otherwise...
  2. achesley

    achesley Old Motorcyclist

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    Noah,
    I had almost forgot that I was also riding Orange many years ago. :rofl ;-) My '78 XT 500. One of the most fun bikes I ever built. :lol3

    [​IMG]
  3. tommymerle

    tommymerle advwanabee

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    frozen north (Lutsen, Minnesota)
    in the states just stay away from the large cities and lane splitting isn't necessary.
  4. RhinoVonHawkrider

    RhinoVonHawkrider Long timer

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    Nah U can lane split, I did so for years in NYC. Not sure I'd do it now, post Range Rover incident.
  5. docwyte

    docwyte Long timer

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    Finally caught up! Not sure what I'm going to do in between patients now...

    My wife loves Thailand, her favorite place is Puket. (sp? Poo ket) Says you can stay at a swanky place for short dough and the beaches are awesome.

    I gotta say, you're making me feel bad about picking the Dakar. A friend (Hi MuffinMan!) has a 690, I may try to scam a ride on it...
  6. mbdisano

    mbdisano n00b

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    Well i've been reading this thread on and off for a few months and as I dream about planning a long trip my first thought is funding. Of course I understand a good savings account is important but when gone for such a long period of time like Noah's trip how do you gain more funds? Any advice would be awesome? What type of jobs do you try to find or what?

    Thanks
  7. RoninMoto

    RoninMoto Wanderer

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    I'm looking forward to SEA. Ride a 690 and you might sell your Dakar. On the BAM, the Dakar was able to do everything the 950 adv could do. But I was having to wait for both of them often. Kim was a decent rider and he didn't beat on the Dakar and the bike couldn't handle the abuse of that road. I'm pretty impressed with the beating the 690 can take and still perform. When most people talk "reliability", they don't take into account the immaturity of the rider :D

    For 5 years I was an onsite Electrical Engineer for a construction contractor who built windfarms. I was always away from home so I never rented a place, bought a new car, bought a house, and/or had a wife or kids. I would encourage any young people out there to travel for work.. especially if you have an engineering degree. The company will have to sweeten the pot since you are away from home. So, per diem, rent, flights home and transportation are usually covered. You can imagine how fast you can save for a trip if you don't need to use your salary to live on and it just goes into the bank. I have not had a job since I started this trip. I helped out a few time with friends, but I don't think I got paid for doing any work on this trip.
  8. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity

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    I just got an email about an interesting new product that probably would have helped you massively when your bike was stolen. Are you using a SPOT tracker? Check this out:
    http://findmespot.ca/en/index.php?cid=130
  9. kyotoviking

    kyotoviking Adventurer

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    Awesome report. I've just spent two weeks reading through everything. Thank you for taking us along on your travel. I have a serious case of PMS (parked motorcycle syndrome) so it was really nice to daydream and see your photos. It's a shame I couldn't meet up with you when you were around. If you ever come back to the Kansai Region, come and stay with us. It's snowing in Hokkaido btw.
  10. SirBikeALot

    SirBikeALot Adventurer

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    Just wanted to say a quick "Thank You" for letting me ride with you ... virtually. I'm impressed with where you went, how you went there and how you experience the things around you. I'm also in awe at how fast you connect with strangers and how you know a lot of people around the world.

    Keep up the reports and the photos. They brighten up my day.
    Best of luck!
  11. Cortez

    Cortez BAZINGA!

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    That's a good first post!
    :clap
  12. Bike Nomad

    Bike Nomad Been here awhile

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    Noah, thank you for sharing your adventures with us. From the Noah’s Arc—suit lead in to the pairings up two by two, to your recent time in Japan. I know it takes a great deal of time and energy to keep this thread updated. Your trials, tribulations, trails, tracks, tinkerings and triumphs have been captivating. Of all the threads I have ever read, I think you must have the greatest number of post #1 responders--people that have been lurking for ages and were so enthralled with your RR they just had to come out from behind the curtain and say so!

    I think it is amazing that you took Fishfund’s former bike--the reviled, orange haired stepchild of 690 unreliability, and by addressing a few known issues and upgrading a few parts turned it into the poster child of reliable RTW capability for the 690.

    The other thing I’ve seen in this thread more than any other is that if a single rider sets off on a journey of this magnitude and doesn’t write a RR as they are going, or take advantage of resources like the couchsurfing/tentspace communities—they are gypping themselves of one of the great rewards of the voyage—getting to meet many more like minded individuals and groups along the way than you would otherwise.

    You mentioned early on the intention to use the RR bashplate fluid reservoir for taking along your next oil change when headed into the back of beyond areas. Did you actually use it for that or instead for carrying extra gasoline or water (hmmm, whiskey maybe?). Any comments on its utility/ease of use? I was thinking that with the reservoir removed that area would be a decent place for carrying a dirty big security chain?

    I know you started off with the KLIM Badlands gear and continue to use it. More and more in your posts I see you are getting drenched through in heavy downpours. Approximately how long did the KLIM gear remain effectively water proof? Any efforts to re-condition it with surface repellency sprays, hot dryers and the like? Is lost of waterproofing covered under KLIM’s warranty? I’ve personally had lousy experiences with brand name Gore-Tex, and knock offs in the distant past—I was kinda hoping to see with current top shelf gear that it was more effective/durable than from the gear from back in the day. Would you buy the same jacket and pants if you had it back?

    I know the Hi-Vis Helmets stand out from a mile away and are great for safety. I’m ambivalent as to whether my next lid will be white or Hi-Vis Yellow. I’m thinking white might be slightly more sunlight reflective for heat issues—and the yellow more attractive to bees and their ilk? Have you had any issues you know of where bees seem to home in on your head more now with the yellow helmet? I guess if you were to have an issue it would have been there in Japan, the land of the dreaded giant hornet.

    Early on in the RR you had the ME guy advising you against the durable rear sprockets as they might lead to premature chain wear. What did your experiment/data show? Accelerated chain wear from expected or heck no, go get the good sprockets?

    Back on the BAM road after a hard days ride you had some beer with your buddies and *made some greyhounds* I tried goggling that phrase without much luck. Can you fill me in on its meaning please?

    Lastly thank you for sharing that link to the RR on the Kiwi that rode to Kabul. Awesome thread, and despite my fascination with well prepped bikes, and gear nuances—That RR goes to show that sometimes you can make it on a 40 year old bike, a pair of jeans, a passport and some determination.

    To butcher an old nautical expression I wish you fair winds, a large following and no seize. :freaky
  13. JustBob

    JustBob Uh...who me?

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    Are you a writer? Well turned phrases, one after the other says so. Just curious.
  14. RoninMoto

    RoninMoto Wanderer

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    Thanks bud. You my friend, picked a great name. :D

    Ok. I numbered yours so I could answer the questions easier. Jebus. :eek1

    1. The 690 had a learning period and most of the issues are now know. Unfortunately for fishfund, when he did his trip, the KTM was a new bike with a learning curve. I greatly benefit from the prior knowledge. The fact remains, the bike really doesn't have many mechanical issues int he motor.

    2. Some times you want to camp. Sometimes you want to meet locals. Sometimes you want to stay with other motoheads. Sometimes you want a hotel to yourself. There are many resources available. As much as I like couch surfer, I find it hard to use unless I know I will be in a big city for a few days. My trip schedule is in weeks or months.. not days. So planning 2 weeks in advance to be in a certain place to get a couch to surf quite a hassle sometimes. Much easier to pitch the tent.

    3. All through Siberia I had Motul in it. I was worried it was mixed with water after a while. I never used the oil because i was worried it mixed with water and I was able to find new oil easily. In Irkutsk, before the BAM, I drained some out into a 20 oz bottle and used it as my spare. There is still some oil in there and I need to check if it has water in it or not. I might go with a regular bash plate in the future. I'll check your idea to carry a chain though.

    4. I just recently washed and sprayed the Klim gear with waterproofing. I had not done that since the start of the trip. More to come.

    5. I like the Arai helmet. It fits me well and it is comfortable. I wish it breathed better but you take the good with the bad. The High Vis is good, but now it is really fading. A few months ago someone asked me if the helmet was fading and I said no. But in retrospect, It probably was fading when he asked but I didn't notice until I lost a plastic vent cover. It revealed a patch of paint that was the brilliant bright yellow that the helmet used to be. I like that people can see it. But in some 3rd world countries.. it sticks out. but.. so does the bike. The good with the bad.

    6. Chains are lasting a while.. but i'm riding in stuff that kills them (dust and dirt). The sprockets hold up amazing and I recommend them.

    7. A greyhound is Vodka and grapefruit juice. A salty dog is a greyhound with salt on the rim. Both are great.

    8. Yup. Many people travel on old bikes and have a great time. His pictures and the part of the world he traveled through made his report deserve praise. :deal
    Ride what you have. Ride when you can. Fix it when it breaks. Have a good time. Repeat.

    I'm an engineer. I never received good grades in creative writing classes. I can't spell with out a computer. Some times its a task, but most of the time I really like reliving the experiences with all of you.

    Cheers.
  15. SirBikeALot

    SirBikeALot Adventurer

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    Thanks. I actually signed up just to "show support". I'm sure it's not all that much fun to post this from inside a tent in the middle of nowhere.
  16. mezcal

    mezcal Been here awhile

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    Adding to the SEA part of your journey, Check up with the relevant authorities where its safe to go and not..
    Certain parts of Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines contain bacon hating extremists that would be best avoided.
    You probably know this as a worldly traverser anyway, apologies if so :D
  17. rickypanecatyl

    rickypanecatyl SE Asia adventure tours

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    Bacon Haters :eek:

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  18. GSF1200S

    GSF1200S Been here awhile

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    Noah, really enjoying the Japan portion of this report. I hit port in Sasebo (sp?) in the Navy and have always wanted to go back to Japan and really have a chance to soak it in. It has to be one of the most unique places in the world.

    Many years on the road. When the wanderlust is satisfied, do you think you'll have issues getting employed due to the absence? I mean obviously if the boss is on advrider youll be hired :lol3, but employers today can be so picky about gaps in work experience, hiring younger people, etc.. does it ever concern you? Maybe pursue a masters?

    I know, don't live under your bed. What you're doing is awesome and an order of magnitude more awesome than the Alaska trip I took this year (which was awesome to me) and no reason to regret one second, but does it ever cross your mind?

    Looking forward to your next report :drink
  19. tyrsmkkyle

    tyrsmkkyle off the ground.

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    still following this noah, thanks to you and kanur, im prepping my gsxr for trade in on a 14 690r hope you guys are happy (: If only i could stay off the twins site, ive got thousands mentally spent on add ons on a bike thats not even in dealers for weeks!
  20. gen

    gen Been here awhile

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    Everything I have heard about the US economy is that firms can't find enough engineers with experience. I think Noah will not hurt for work as long as he is flexible about job location.


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