RTW X-Challenge Adventurization

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Colebatch, Nov 13, 2009.

  1. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    I was gonna say its my hydraulically powered satellite internet connection, which feeds through the aerial on the front of the fairing:

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  2. Bli55

    Bli55 -

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    :D

    As for the headlight, I am not expressing what I mean clearly...
    Correct me when this thinking gets incorrect:

    In the original wiring, I assume, starter button would momentarily cut out the power to high/low beam as to make all battery resources available for cranking the engine - but you aren't using these particular wires for anything?
    So instead your ignition switch sends power (via relay and manual switches) to the headlights directly and is always powered when you turn the key.
    When you press the starter button, nothing happens to the headlights.
    Or does it??
    Since cranking engine causes large voltage drop in the whole system, this will definitely be felt in the headlights (since in your system they can be left on during engine starting) - either as some harmless flickering or HIDs conking out and having to relight (very current-comsuming and bulb life-shortening).


    ____________________________

    Also, misunderstanding regarding navigation in the 2012 report...
    What i meant to say is that your tracks must have nad to be very detailed for the kind of riding and thus had to contain many points (which i called waypoints by mistake) per kilometer, limiting the total length because of points available to each track.
    If so, did you have to upload new tracks often from the laptop?
  3. Erik RS

    Erik RS Three Wheel Maniac

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    I wire the HID's through the original relais, but with separate switches, so they can be switched off at will. An electronically genial friend of mine, has calculated that it might be bulblife shortening to connect them over the relais (restart the lighting), but that their expected life is still longer than that of the bike, so............:wink:
    HID ballasts are often equipped with an automatic switch off at voltage drop, so might leave you without lights after starting the engine (damhik :D).
  4. overlandr

    overlandr Dystopist

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    Opps!! Thanks - is that a standard oem fitment?
  5. Marco Moto

    Marco Moto Voyager

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    I believe Colebatch has it in development, but I am not sure 100%. Maybe he'll pipe in and enlighten us...
  6. O'B

    O'B Long timer

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    Man those are great looking bags. Nice job!
  7. flying.moto

    flying.moto Earthbound Misfit, I

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    Awesome! Just ordered two!
  8. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    I did get your question, but maybe I wasnt clear enough in my response.

    The headlights are NOT on the original headlight circuit ... therefore they do NOT go thru the headlight relay. I run a second fusebox up front of the bike which takes a high capacity feed via a power relay from a switched ignition circuit. i,e, when ignition is switched on, my front fuse box becomes live.

    From that additional front fuse box, I run direct feeds to the likes of the headlights and stebel horn and other accessories like garmin, cig lighter sockets, heated grips etc.

    Therefore there is no headlight dim on start relay in my circuits. They are unworkable with HID xenon / bixenon lights as has been mentioned.





  9. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    The daily tracks / routes contained a lot of points ... between 500 and 2000 per day to get the accuracy required.

    On my Montana, I loaded them all at the start of the trip - all 60 odd daily tracks, no top ups. Montanas have an excellent ability to handle a large number of points.

    most of the people I rode with were also riding with Montanas, so they also had no problems, but Terry was riding with a Zumo. Zumo's are not even in the ballpark when it comes to off road navigation. I had to cut up each daily track into several small pieces, convert them to routes, and then filter each piece to that for Terry a route could contain no more than 250 points, or the Zumo would be unable to handle it. Some days I Terry would have to stop 4-5 times to load the next piece of route. Also the Zumo would only take a few days routes at a time in its memory.

    Sometimes I would just give up on the Zumo and tell Terry he has no track / route for today ... meaning he would have to follow me. Normally we tried to mix it up at the front, and give Terry a fair share of the navigating action. But when time was short, or the Zumo was being difficult, we just gave up and he had to eat my dust.
  10. 6USMC6

    6USMC6 Long timer

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    Walter -
    Which specific Montana do you have?

    600, 650, 650T ?
    cmiguelq likes this.
  11. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    600

    Afaik the navigation and memory hardware is identical between them all.
  12. tee bee

    tee bee Been here awhile

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    I am in the process of having a few of the oil coolers manufactured, i should have some news this week of costs, and availability.
  13. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    Well if big bad Doug likes em, he is gonna ask me to get him a set soon!

    I dont think I deserve a lot of credit for brining the product to market, I just think other manufacturers should have done it a long time ago. I dont want to go into the adventure motorcycling business. I did it thru necessity.

    If there is one thing I have noticed about adventure motorcycling in general, its that the people who design and make the products (and the bikes) for adventure motorcycling, dont actually do adventure motorcycling - at least not in the form of trans continental or RTW adventuring through the developing world. So if you are like Doug or myself, setting off on a 3 month trip thru the non-western world, you sorta kinda have to build your own stuff (or get custom stuff built for you in my case) in order to do the job you want to get it done. Because ironically, despite the popularity of the image of adventure motorcycling, the products to do the job in real life arent really there.

    The US market is dominated by domestic weekend riders, so US made bags like wolfman etc, are not large enough for serious international touring, and not lockable. The European market is dominated by German manufacturers, who make massive aluminium boxes to fit on massive bikes that dont even have 21 inch front wheels, and are not really designed to go off road. The German notion of adventure motorcycling is very much about carrying 400 kgs of bike and gear around the world, in large inflexible metal boxes, at a sober pace, on bad asphalt or occasional gravel roads. The US version of adventure motorcycling is dominated by the idea of having a lot of fun on a single cylinder dirt bike with light luggage on a 4 day ride around Moab. Those are the two main adventure motorcycling markets on the planet. And most adv gear manufacturers come from those two countries - and design products to fit those two concepts of adventure motorcycling.

    Somewhere in between those is what I (rightly or wrongly) call the British version - taking a single cylinder off road bike (as per the US version) and going to the 3rd world on it (as per the German version) ... thus combining the most exciting aspects of both - as per Austin Vince, Chris Scott et al. The problem is in Britain there are very very few manufacturers supporting adventure motorcycling (and by extension very few products exist to support this "mid-atlantic" version of adventure motorcycling) ... so historically, people like myself, or Austin Vince, or Chris Scott have often had to patch together home-made semi-experimental solutions to questions like luggage.

    Hopefully over time, there will be more products available for this version of adventure motorcycling which combines the thrill of fast aggressive exploratory off road riding, with the excitement of travel through exotic 3rd world cultures. I have been very lucky with my bike to have manufacturers like Hot-Rod and Hyperpro in Holland, Scheffelemeier in Germany and now Adventure-Spec in the UK work with me to create products specifically to fit those requirements.
  14. 6USMC6

    6USMC6 Long timer

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    Thank you. My Zumo has begun to exhibit it's limitations.
  15. deathu

    deathu Adventurer

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    Hi Walter,

    Assuming you are still using the FX-R headlight projectors, how did they hold up after all the trips you put them through? Did you have any problems with them at all? Would you buy them again if you had to choose a HID projector?
    And very important, where did you get the projectors from? Did you find any seller in Europe, or you brought them from the US?

    Thanks!
  16. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    I like them - I have no plans to change them. I have a few spare sets.

    PM me
  17. clearandlock

    clearandlock Been here awhile

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    Could not lift it out, had to unload everything.

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  18. Bearded Hooligan

    Bearded Hooligan Moto Addict

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    I may have missed it, but where would one be able to purchase this fairing and bracket? Cost? Thinking of ditching the GSA for a lighter, durable adventurer tourer. Went the 690R route and one point and will not go down that road again. Love the wind protection and look from this fairing on the X.
  19. oothef

    oothef Grownup

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    or till
  20. flying.moto

    flying.moto Earthbound Misfit, I

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    So here it is!
    I finally had 1.5 days off in a row, hung the Panniers over, used 2 ROK straps on each side, one in the intended horizontal place, and one vertically through the lock loops. Both 2L bottles filled with water, one stuffed with extra layers for myself. the other, with spare tube and tools. Pounded some whoops in the desert, and some sagebrush before i remembered the new width of the vehicle. I think in those few brushups the shrubs lost! :lol3

    All I can say, this is one sweet (tough) set of luggage! Love it! Very roomy.

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