"Russification" of BMW G650X.

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Bli55, Jan 18, 2014.

  1. Murphy Slaw

    Murphy Slaw Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,965
    Location:
    Southern Illinois
    Hell yea.....

    :super
    #21
  2. scooter noob

    scooter noob Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    536
    Location:
    DSM, IA
    Loving this build!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #22
  3. el_lobo

    el_lobo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2013
    Oddometer:
    149
    Location:
    Berlin, Germany
    great thread ... :clap
    Gives me a lot of inspiration for my next build!

    Looks a bit heavyweight, I would take aluminum.
    #23
  4. Bli55

    Bli55 -

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Russia, N56 E49.
    Thank you for the comments!

    Unless you've already ordered, consider replacing at least one with a bixenon projector.
    You will still have a halogen as back-up and as police repellant, but heaps more light when you want from the xenon.


    I used cheapest polyurethane sealant from ebay. It comes in a big tube and easy to choose, just go for black. :D

    Reason being is that vast majority of RTV silicone sealants (including those marketed as "sensor safe"!!) outgas acetic acid during curing, which is somewhat corrosive.

    So if you smell vinegar, keep it away from lights! And bike in general! They will attack reflectors, casings, solenoid, electrical connectors etc... :huh



    At just over a kilo? Granted, aluminium could be made lighter maintaining the same strength, but not so much considering how thin my steel was. And I wouldn't be able to get it welded easily, and if it broke, it would've been a large problem.

    Whilst we are on the subject, I posted a question on that rallye tower thread about what thickness they would recommend to use, because I didn't see any made from steel and wasn't sure how thin you could go before the increased strength of material would be outweighed by it's decreased thickness.

    The general concensus was 2 mm at the smallest, but to keep weight down, I still opted for 1.2 mm.
    Now, based on Erik's experience, 2 mm aluminium could be made to work, but 3 mm is preferred.

    So my tower would need to be 3/1.2 = 2.5 times thicker if made from alu.
    Density of aluminium is about a third of steel, so overall weight change becomes:

    2.5/3 = 0.83, or 17 % lighter.

    Note this saving won't include the dash, as it is already super thin and a bit flimsy...

    But yes, I agree with you - next one will be aluminium! :D
    #24
  5. Aquatic

    Aquatic Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,461
    Location:
    Buddina, Sunny Coast, Australia
    sub
    love you work Sir
    #25
  6. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,995
    Location:
    Snowy Mountains Oz
    Ditto :thumb
    #26
  7. Bli55

    Bli55 -

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Russia, N56 E49.
    Final installment before we go into the work done now, in preparation for coming riding season!! :clap

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    Tower installed properly with wiring and various brackets.

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    I wanted an easily removable main feed wires, so for the positive this is the method that came to mind:

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    Above, those lower brackets to support the dash were added at the last minute, as I was still working out how the dash would be mounted and if there was time to upgrade indicators.
    There wasn't, so I made it one piece to support both the dash and original indicators with their unusual offset hole...

    You see, LOTS of extra wiring length!!


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    Other than that, everything seemed to fit, so it was a matter of laying out the connectors, bolting on the bits and assembling it all together.

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    Next, I got to brake line. Now, the stock routing is done in it's strange way most likely to make assembly between ABS and non-ABS models nearly the same.
    Other than for the purpose of standartisation, there's no need to have the brake line FROM the distributor block going BACK to master cylinder. In fact, there's no connection inside the banjo, they are 2 separate pathways.

    With the stationary nav tower and low fender, I could make an optimal routing. Tens of measurements later sent my numbers to HEL!!


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    Also finally found aftermarket levers from Germany! Loving them!


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    Trying to keep to a certain color scheme, I went for blue accents here and there.
    Funnily enough, the bike has 4 shades of blue now and none of them match!!

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    Oh yeah, one of the levерs needed drilling out.

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    Good timing to replace hoses, as the stock ones have a very long metal section and it was catching on Erik's bracket.

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    Glad to report the hose dimensions were spot on, and the angles were perfect!

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    They were all tightened the designed way, with the metal of the fitting wedged against the metal stop.
    This is full lock:

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    Not so happy on the radii, but worked ok...

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    Full right lock again.


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    Into full left.
    The hoses don't rub over entire stroke.


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    Switches ended up on one side, because I forgot about heated frips controller when planning...

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    Standing position.
    Note how low and flat the dash is.

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    TKC80's went on.

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    This is to explain why to have those socks. Stock travel of F800GS is 230 mm, so the fork shield are shorter.
    Additionally, I cut off the lower bits and mounted it lower than usual.
    Together, this meant the top of my forks would be exposed under extension. So the socks protect them.

    They have now come off, as their ability to protect the seals by keeping dirt out is dubious. As expected, they would trap dirt underneath...
    Maybe a solid one would do better, but for me it would be a proper shield all the way up.

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    And this is the slapped on headlight shield.

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    During oil change, I decided to fix this new bolt, it has been bugging me by hanging slightly below bashplate.
    So I took to get the flange and top turned down on a lathe and them extended the hex flats with a dremel.

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    Also installed the oil cooler, which is a big beast!

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    And finally, X-tank, weighing in at 2.46 Kg.

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    Time was pressing, so it wasn't until riding to Erik's workshop that we got the luggage rack installed.
    Reason for not ordering it from the start is I wanted a slightly different top rack and thought it would be interesting to try and design one myself.

    Again, Erik was helpful in adapting his own design to my request, shortenening the rear section and getting rid of an outer rail.


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    Compare to full version:

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    (click on pictures for source and more full size snaps).


    This would reduce temptation to load more crap at the back as well as saving a little weight.
    Total came to 3.4 kg.

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    Also looks much leaner and sleeker, in my view.


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    Also used the rubber mouting bushings as on Xtank, that work much better.


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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As a little aside, it was my first time to drive anything with bixenon lighting.
    Especially impressive on a bike!

    It...was...mesmerising.
    The razor sharp cutoff, the flickering violet, the spread of light...the way it explodes into life, then setlles down to a soothing glow...Just wow!

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    :freaky :freaky :freaky
    #27
  8. Bike Nomad

    Bike Nomad Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2011
    Oddometer:
    347
    Location:
    Central Newfoundland, Canada
    Does the Bi-Xenon projector have a high and low beam per unit or just the low beam? Is it the same one Colebatch uses? I know he uses them in pairs. Do your LEDs function as high beam or aux?

    I was wondering why you went with the double take mirrors instead of the highway dirt bikes mirrors? I know both of those mirrors are highly regarded by their users--did you maybe already have the double takes prior to getting the HDB hand guards, or just merely had a preference for the double takes?

    The upper and lower sets of metal "belt loops" on the bash plate were they to give the option of using ring clamps to secure tool tubes/PVC pipe or similar?

    Did you ever find the bashplate toolbox with its unsloped profile hanging up on stuff more than you would have liked--or it was a non-issue?:ear

    I like that thing so much I've e-mailed the maker, and he tells me he can custom build one them to the customers specs.

    Amazingly well thought out build, you continue to impress. Are you willing to reveal to us if your profession is related to engineering or mechanic work? If you are not, you are a heck of a hobbyiest! :freaky
    #28
  9. Bli55

    Bli55 -

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Russia, N56 E49.
    Bike Nomad, yeah, forgot to mention that Colebatch's first version used a pair of projectors off an Audi A6(A8?), then a pair of FX-R, but they are the earlier version.

    Mine are version 3, slightly different visually, not sure about internals.

    Each BIxenon projector has a bulb that always glows, and a solenoid-driven shield that alters beam cutoff between low/high.
    This is why I don't see the point of having 2 such projectors. In my opinion, it is redundant, i.e. mainly there for backup, as HID bulbs might not be as easy to find. And if a ballast fails, also less easy.
    Yes, there's theoretically twice the amount of light, but this can be increased by using 50W system and premium bulbs. :deal

    ----

    Managed to dig out this photo! It is exactly what I was searching for when looking for information about both types of mirror, reading reports etc. Inevitably, answer came from advrider, in the form of this shot:

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    (other comparison pics - http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=15864070&postcount=178)

    I liked how double take mirrors are larger, closer to your line of sight, have almost infinite adjustment, and did I mention larger? :deal
    I use mirrors A LOT, so this was unquestionable factor.

    Finally, stock mirror location is not threaded into clutch perch or master cylinder, so there's no burning need to relocate from there.


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    What type of ring clamp are we talking here?

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    Unsloping profile - do you mean the flat part towards the front of engine where the non-toolbox bashplate hugs it by going up? It did catch occasionally, but you kind of know when it's coming! :D
    So not as bad as you might imagine...

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    I wonder, what sort of specs would you supply to change existing design?

    -------

    Profession? :D
    Lol, I'd rather call it "obsessive compulsive hobbying"!
    :freaky
    #29
  10. jtw000

    jtw000 Survivor

    Joined:
    May 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    762
    Location:
    Phnom Penh, Cambdia
    I'm loving your attention to detail. Lovely work and the really impressive thing is you're doing it yourself, not just throwing money at other people to do it all for you.
    About your "fairing" though, I've modded my XC with a set of Buell headlights with HID xenon, they worked brilliantly and made a vast improvement over stock. My only issue was in positioning the screen, I was constantly getting some kind of glare, no matter what I did. Your screen wraps right around the lights, are you not getting any reflection coming back at you? I know polycarbonate has a tendency to gather light and bleed it around the edge, is this a problem as your screen is quite low? Which brings me to my next question, if the lights are for external use so do you really need to shield them at all?
    #30
  11. Bli55

    Bli55 -

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Russia, N56 E49.

    Polycarbonete? Glare? What's that? :D
    Seriously though, I was getting HUGE, huge glare...and with the VisionX DRL's at night on high beam with bixenon? Forget it! :rofl

    You are right in that it wasn't too much of a real problem as I never needed to look anywhere near the screen, as it was very low and out of the way.
    But it did give a nice purplish-blue edge to it, and I was able to tell which of the lights were on during the day from the reflection.

    Now I am a wiser man and can appreciate an opaque traditional style fairing. Oh, and illuminated buttons! :deal

    A screen was put on purely for mechanical protection of lenses, it is nothing to do with weather protection, if that's what you are referring to as outdoor.

    Do you have a picture of what your screen looks like?
    #31
  12. Bli55

    Bli55 -

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Russia, N56 E49.
    Moving onto post-trip work now...

    I figured the mileage won't exceed factory recommended 10000 km, so I skipped oil change and rode it all on one.

    In retrospect, probably should've changed halfway through, as this is how the filter looked after 9200 km: :huh

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    (at least, it did it's job, and did it well!)

    Also drained the water and put on proper clamps.

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    I ordered a new clutch switch, so wanted to butcher the old one and see how it broke.
    Surprisinly, it wasn't inside the body, where I thought it would be because of being wedged against handlebars...

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    In the end, found it here, just a random ripped wire INSIDE undamaged insulation. :wink:

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    So now I have a professional bypass! :evil

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    My friend came over and we weighed my bike. Because I already started disassembling, it needed to be accounted for! :deal :D

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    Then we did the only sane thing.
    And dropped in on the side!


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    Dimple bolt...Without it's protective plating, rust is having a party. :freaky

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    Then the frame side section came out, which finally allowed to take off the 2 remaining bolts of left engine part and get to that pesky water pump (WTF, BMW???).

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    Meanwhile, turned attention to the swingarm, a great example of BMW's asymmetric lunacy! :D
    (Notice where is has been rubbing on oil return line.)


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    This spacer was scratched, but I decided to keep it for now.

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    Bearings were good, so just cleaned and stuffed with grease, and put in new seals.

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    Got a waterpump kit, and was relieved to find the difference.
    I should explain, coolant was up to the max at ~3000km, then at ~11000 km it was almost empty. So I filled it up again, and now in only 2000km of selaed roads level dropped noticeably again.
    However, I didn't see water come out anywhere, including the overflow and the weep hole, nor it was pouring into the oil...

    Basically, I wasn't sure there even was a problem and if it really was disappearing, that it was through the water pump.
    But it would be a first natural choice.


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    So you can imagine after all this trouble to find an ever so slightly scored shaft, almost couldn't even feel the grooves.
    But then, when I slid new seals onto the old shaft, THEN I felt the difference. It was like putting it in ...hmmm...or.... Much much tighter!

    Hopefully, this will cure it.
    Still don't know if this sort of wear is enough to cause coolant loss...And why it would do that so soon. Maybe the rubber just goes hard with age even with little riding?

    To prolong life of new set, I used double-lipped SKF seals instead of standart ones included.

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    Conviniently sized sockets drove them in nicely.

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    Don't forget to press in the outer seal "backwards" and not go too deep!! (used a toothpick to feel through the weep hole.)

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    Gear pushed on tightly.

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    Anybody know what the newer Loncin engines have stamped inside them??


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    Of course, a new SKF gear change shaft seal went it whilst in there.

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    Other than that, all looks good inside:

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    #32
  13. Dorito

    Dorito Dreamer and Doer

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,016
    Location:
    Maryland
    Any idea what the wire size and grid spacing / opening size of the mesh was?

    http://images2.mcmaster.com/Content...openingwidth-3x3meshsize-spec.png?ver=2994191
    #33
  14. jtw000

    jtw000 Survivor

    Joined:
    May 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    762
    Location:
    Phnom Penh, Cambdia
    I've messed around with various (failed)setups. This was my first but a I got a fair bit of glare. In the end I got it adjusted about right. This was a Europe mostly-tarmac setup expecting a fair bit of rain so the screen was set high .

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    After immense dissatisfaction with standard lighting I eventually settled on a Buell setup with twin HIDs. I had both on for full power. Lighting was awesome.

    Here she is in Iran. It was the same screen but moved higher. I was also inspired by the BMW R1150gs setup and had an enduro styled shield behind the screen which was permanent and the screen was removable depending on weather. Once I got to Asia and the heat got too much, i ditched the screen which had cracked from the vibration in any case. For reference it was a Puig Aprillia Pegaso screen. Waste of money, if you ask me.

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    I think I get you now. The lights you're using are meant to have a shield up front because they're taken from a car cluster? Is that correct?
    #34
  15. Bli55

    Bli55 -

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Russia, N56 E49.
    It was the most course stainles mesh from Inoxia, a UK company.

    Mesh Count Nominal Aperture (mm) Wire Diameter Open Area (%) Weight kg/m²
    4 5.45 0.9mm (20 SWG) 74 1.61

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/STAINLESS...ment_Lab_Supplies_ET&var=&hash=item3a7c9692b0


    jtw000, I don't see how you were getting lots of glare since the screen isn't covering the lights and is above their line of lighting...

    You are right about analogy with a car headlight, but it is not essential. The VisionX's are really tough and their lens is advertised as being ultra hard too.
    So really is not essential, but better!

    Stones flicked by trucks easily crack cars' windscreens, so I like to protect them a little more.
    #35
  16. jtw000

    jtw000 Survivor

    Joined:
    May 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    762
    Location:
    Phnom Penh, Cambdia
    I didn't get any glare on the second version, loads on the first. I have to say, I'm not a fan of the aesthetic end results of your setup but I reckon that extending it upwards into a weather-proof screen would look better. I also reckon a little adhesive film wrapped around it to give it some style would do wonders.
    #36
  17. keiPHadventure

    keiPHadventure Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    Oddometer:
    71
    Location:
    Manila, Philippines
    Wow what a great build! It's so inspiring! Keep it coming OP!
    #37
  18. Bli55

    Bli55 -

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Russia, N56 E49.
    Put in new seals into swingarm, went to the closed-cup bearing side.

    There, I noticed something amiss. New seal went in and disappeared beneath the face. It was a 4mm seal and Reprom stated bearing is to be pressed in by 4 mm.

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    From the back:

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    (full post - http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=22800168&postcount=5473)


    As it turns out, bearing was pressed in by 5.3 mm. Now, this is not actualy critical by the way in which this swingarm is mounted (asymmetric lunacy again...), but it is unlikely to have moved during riding, which leaves only the factory where it must have been carelessly slapped in!

    So we fixed it with the correct tool and technique. :D


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    After:

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    One or two of the bearings of the chain rollers seized.
    Not surprising with the pityful amount of grease they put it during asssembly...

    Compare properly loaded vs. factory filled on the right.

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    Also replaced the bolts with hex heads to facilitate future removal.


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    --------------------------------------------------


    Next, do you remember that awful oil temp sensor placement?

    I finally got round to redoing it properly as should have been from the start.

    It is going to go here, into the tank right beside the outflow pipe.



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    This has several advantages. It doesn't compromise clearance of oil return pipe, obviously.
    It doesn't interfere with flow and doesn't create an area of smaller diameter.
    It eliminates two extra connections.

    Importantly, it should provide a more accurate reading. I shall comment on that after I get the bike back on the road, but my reasoning seems to apply from watching it during idling warm-up.


    I took to my friend and we got a threaded steel bushing made and TIG welded in.

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    Perhaps for the best, I don't have a pic of how it looked right after welding. It was horrible!! But now, with a little clean, not so scary...

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    With this rare opportunity in hand, I decided to go all out and treat my oil tank to get rid of existing and prevent future rust.

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    And after the magic:

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    Before:

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    ...and after:

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    Paint room. :D


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    A safety sticker has found it's true place on a wall too.

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    Sort of blends in, right?

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    ---------------------------------------------------------


    If you own a G650X, most likely than not you know of their clutch issues and what catastrophic result it can come too.

    Read, eg. here: http://www.ukgser.com/forums/showthread.php?280694-Clutch-mechanism-failure-(Again!)

    Luckily, I didn't experience this issue, and all looked good inside.
    Teeth were unworn and I decided to insert a steel bushing to prevent this from happening.

    This has proved to be a massive, major PITA and a huge waste of time and energy.


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    Why? Read on:
    First, the stock hole must be enlarged.
    I left my cover with the bearings in the place only to get a text that it was a disaster, a cutting tip got shattered, it wasn't working and was coming off the mill.

    Yep, bearings are HARD!!

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    On a plus side, this was also a huge learning experience.

    It was impossible to remove that bearing and I ended up messing up the finish quite bad. Tried penetrating oil, heating, banging, prying, praying and swearing....

    Then I got offered help from UKGSER forum and an inmate dropped me off his "tool" to remove the inner needle bearing.
    Despite it being put in a most inaccessible place, he found a way.

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    Basically, a long bolt with ends flattened and a hole drilled through it, where a piece of drill shank is inserted through a little hole on the clutch cover itself and it is that what pushes against the bearing.

    Read on and the pictures should give a 1000 times better explanation.

    First, it didn't work and ate the puller.

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    So I repeated, made the holder as long as I dared not to scratch inner surface and placed a ring spanner strategically (and more importantly, it now had space to get a good grip on the nut.)

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    I then tightened it as far as it would go and put in the oven at 60-80 deg C.
    Once in while I'd take it out and put additional pressure on the bolt.

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    Until....eventually...

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    Can you imagine how good it was?

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    For the outer bearing, I used this awesome extractor for the first time.

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    Jaws locate and spread against the inner race, gripping it.

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    2-3 slides of that chunky hammer...

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    And ..voila!
    Takes literally a minute.

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    To be countinued....


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    Meanwhile, paint has dried and it was time to install the temp. sensor.
    Toyed with the idea of installing this huge one from Stack, but it wasn't the right resistance...

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    So used the same one as before and secured the wire to itself to prevent it getting ripped off again.


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    Finally, can you guess where is this from?


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    #38
  19. Twinmike

    Twinmike Grandpa

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    172
    Location:
    Austria
    thank you for your description of the modifications they are very helpful in my project :clap
    #39
  20. motorrat

    motorrat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    196
    Must be the Exhaust coated black?

    What is the Original position of the temp sensor?
    #40