Rust Removal

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by JimVonBaden, Jun 4, 2013.

  1. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Quoted from here: http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=203018

    I am going to give this a shot!:deal

    Jim :brow
    #1
  2. kubiak

    kubiak Long timer

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    im going to try that out. thanks!
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  3. Cogswell

    Cogswell Spudly Adventurer

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    Good information, thanks Jim !


    Mike
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  4. Danjal

    Danjal Insert wit here.

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    I've used both,they both work.
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  5. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    Vinegar & salt is also very good on heavily corroded brass.Still needs polishing after but will save you a lot of work. For the cheapos....use cleaning or stripping vinegar, much higher Acetic Acid content than household vinegar. Any good commercial cleaning supplies place should have that by the gallon.
    #5
  6. NoVa Rider

    NoVa Rider Long timer

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    Now coat that chain with some ACF-50! :lol3 :lol3 :lol3
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  7. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    :baldy

    Jim :brow
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  8. 396

    396 low-post lurker

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    I wonder how it works on plated parts?
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  9. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    On the thread link I posted a guy used it on chrome plated tools with good results.

    Jim :brow
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  10. mcma111

    mcma111 Long timer

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    How much salt to a gallon of vinegar? Table salt, rock salt, kosher salt??
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  11. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Anatomically Correct

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    the site cites:

    I use a cup of salt to a gallon, some use a tablespoon.
    I know we have a chemist that that will tell us of acids and chlorides and ratios.


    and . . . . .

    I used about a quart of white vinegar and a few tablespoons of salt in an aluminum baking pan. I set the pan in the sun to warm it a couple of times, then left it to set in the garage for a week. You could see the foaming action, and the rust just falling off, I am still amazed! I cleaned the pan and soaked them in about the same ratio of water and baking soda. I just pulled them this weekend, and washed them with soapy water. The rust had already taken off the chrome plating, but they arent pitted, and look pretty good! I didnt even use a wire brush on them, and the rust is gone! I havent decided yet, but i may just try polishing them, and see how that goes. <!-- / message -->
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  12. mcma111

    mcma111 Long timer

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  13. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Anatomically Correct

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  14. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    2/3 of a Stagg Chili can of Alaskan De-Icer ( Calcium Chloride). Rock grits included they put some in there for traction.:wink:

    2/3 US quart of "cleaning Vinegar, double strenght" at around 10% acetic acid content vs household vinegar at 5%.

    Tiny bubbles after an hour, some of the rusty chain is turning black already.:D

    Seeya in a few hundred Kms....better things to do than watch bubbles.:clap
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  15. 396

    396 low-post lurker

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    Cool process, but after reading about the hydrogen being formed and released from the surface of the steel, it sparked my memory. I've had some grade 8 bolts fail in the past due to "hydrogen embrittlement" It's a process where the steel ends up with microscopic pressure points than can lead to cracking. It might not apply here, but I don't think I would try this on a drive chain.

    From Wiki:
    Hydrogen embrittlement is the process by which various metals, most importantly high-strength steel, become brittle and fracture following exposure to hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is often the result of unintentional introduction of hydrogen into susceptible metals during forming or finishing operations and increases cracking in the material. This phenomenon was first described in 1875.<sup id="cite_ref-mcgillpr2012_1-0" class="reference">[1]</sup>

    <sup id="cite_ref-mcgillpr2012_1-0" class="reference"></sup>

    Hydrogen embrittlement can occur during various manufacturing operations or operational use - anywhere that the metal comes into contact with atomic or molecular hydrogen. Processes that can lead to this include cathodic protection, phosphating, pickling, and electroplating.
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  16. mcma111

    mcma111 Long timer

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    The dumb fucks at Caltrans spec'ed out Zinc coated bolts for the new eastern half of the San Francisco Bay bridge. Even though all of the bridge builders/metallurgists in the USA say not to use these bolts due to Hydrogen Embrittlement. There are a shit load of bolts and rods that have already broken or cracked and they want to open the bridge for service Memorial Day weekend. Not gonna happen. Some of these bolts are deep inside the structure and can not be removed or accessed. Back to the drawing board ya fucks.
    #16
  17. jonzn

    jonzn Adventurer

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    Oxalic acid (also known as wood bleach) does an excellent job on steel and chrome.
    jonzn
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  18. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    :eek1:eek1:eek1 I think I'll go remove my hi-grade chain from the pickling juice. I do use them under very high tension, no need to fracture that one and send it flying at high speed. That was like a gunshot when I saw that happen years ago, went off so fast it could have killed someone.:eek1
    #18
  19. HanShotFirst

    HanShotFirst Been here awhile

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    To be quite honest, you don't need the salt, the white vinegar does all the work.

    It doesn’t remove rust real fast, give it a good 30-45 minutes, but it will do the job.

    I’m a gunsmith and I use a white vinegar/water mix to chemically remove bluing on guns before I polish them and re-blue. Bluing on guns is just a controlled rusting, so anything that removes bluing will remove rust. It’s not uber-fast, but it’s cheap and requires no elbow grease.

    But something else to consider. That rusted chain in the photos could be turned into bluing. Take the rusted chain just as it is and boil it in water for 10 mintes. Take it out, and cover the whole thing in WD40 and it will take on a black finish. The WD40 will stop the rusting process and now you have a chain with a semi-protective finish. Better than de-rusting it.
    #19
  20. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Been here awhile

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    I've used vinegar for many years now. Works fine. Never used salt in it, and I can't figure out any reason to. Though I may give it a comparison try with some rusty bolts or such. For the action you show in the pictures is mighty fast and frothy for vinegar.

    For even faster and stronger acid action, use something like oxalic acid or such, deck cleaner from the hardware store. Though I personally like the gentleness and easy disposal of vinegar.

    As for evaporust and such, it's a different process, and is slower. You can do it cheaply if you go buy a 50 bag of beet pulp from the feed store. You can make a whopping big batch that way. Stinks like you wouldn't believe after a few weeks though.
    #20