1. skclarey

    skclarey Tempe trail rider

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2006
    Oddometer:
    61
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Wow she (2010 990) really is misbehaving in sand. The front end wants to swap in a bad way. Even with stabilizer almost fully cranked in. Any front end advice for sandy roads....
    #1
  2. Blue&Yellow

    Blue&Yellow but orange inside...

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    754
    Location:
    Sweden
    What tyres are you running? Lowered the tyre pressure? Standing on the pegs? Gaze far ahead? Easy on the handlebars and steer with your knees? Let it move beneth you? When in doubt gas it?
    #2
  3. mousitsas

    mousitsas Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,217
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    No chance to get the max out of it unless you sort the front end springs. In any case, you have to really tighten your suspension, try sport settings to start with.
    #3
  4. CRW

    CRW I dont want a pickle

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2005
    Oddometer:
    798
    Location:
    Cotati Ca. USA
    trottle is your buddy:D
    #4
  5. skclarey

    skclarey Tempe trail rider

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2006
    Oddometer:
    61
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Lowered the front tire pressure, standing up, trying to steer with legs etc, I've been desert racing for years and just cant believe how the front end wants to tank swap. Forks are headed to Superplush this week hopefully that will help.
    #5
  6. FakeName

    FakeName Wile E Coyote SuperGenius

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,028
    Location:
    San Diego
    The stabilizer may be your problem. The bike wants to move around a bit and I've found too much stabilizer will work against me, and make me fall down.

    Other thing to know:


    Riding in sand is difficult, especially on a wallowing 500lb beast of a bike.


    Yes, "gas it out" is always the over-simplified answer, and works a treat- until you have to slow down for sharp turns or (like yesterday) deep, long (miles) sections of sand whoops.
    #6
  7. traveltoad

    traveltoad Aaron S

    Joined:
    May 8, 2002
    Oddometer:
    6,769
    Location:
    San Fernando Valley
    Especially with a full tank (which always seems to be the case when I come to the deepest sand) there is a lot of weight on the front end... Gotta get your weight back.
    #7
  8. Blue&Yellow

    Blue&Yellow but orange inside...

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    754
    Location:
    Sweden
    If you've been desert racing for years you're more experienced than I am. But have you tried lowering the rear suspension and stiffening up the front? That increases the steering rake angle and should make the bike more stable.

    Also - stupid question: your front wheel is spinning smootlhy right? No gravel or anything between the disc and the caliber?
    #8
  9. EZ300

    EZ300 Just wanna ride my motorsickle

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,420
    Location:
    ARIDZONA
    Talent,... You need more of it. :ksteve
    #9
  10. Eldon

    Eldon 950 ADV

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Oddometer:
    603
    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    Yes don't over rely on your stabilizer. Turn it back a few turns so you're not fighting it. Now use that throttle!! You need to be moving at least 40 mph to break plain, then things will settle down. stand up and let that beast move under you. Speed is your friend!
    #10
  11. knobbyjoe

    knobbyjoe Adventure and dirt rider

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    635
    Location:
    N by NW of The Biggest Little City
    My little sand lesson. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Find sand without obstacles, keep speed down, and practice a given stretch many times so you become comfortable while you learn how to react automatically. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    From a stand still, look ahead, aggressively look ahead to where you want to go, aim with your eyes and lean forward as if you "will" yourself to the spot. Do this in a straight line at first. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Think of working the throttle up and down rpm's with the back spinning and let the bike work under you. If you strive to look where you want to go and let your body move to control the direction, then the bike can take care of its job and go there. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Handlebar grip should be firm but light, don't fight, just guide the front. Your body needs to move around, the bodies weight distribution allows the back tire to sweep and steer the bike. To learn you got to loosen up and experiment and at the same time aiming to a spot to go. Don’t be looking down at the front tire. Looking ahead gives you balance and control. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    After the straight stretch is going OK start some sweeping turns with the rear tire spinning. When you can start “drifting” back and forth you are getting it. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    As an example of the time and effort you need to get results think of learning to play a simple song on the violin. Practice and practice and you will be rewarded. For learning safety beware of riding too fast. This can be done a slower speeds. Enjoy and have fun.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>

    #11
  12. Boatman

    Boatman Membership has it's privileges ;-)

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Oddometer:
    11,362
    Location:
    Petersburg, NY and Mill Spring, NC
  13. Katoom72

    Katoom72 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Oddometer:
    952
    Location:
    Belgium
    It's as easy as it is hard. Don't fight the bike.
    Theh arder u clamp on the grips the more the front end wil be upset, let the wheel find it's on way.
    #13
  14. traveltoad

    traveltoad Aaron S

    Joined:
    May 8, 2002
    Oddometer:
    6,769
    Location:
    San Fernando Valley
    #14
  15. Nowwhat

    Nowwhat I'll Go Second...

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,578
    Location:
    On the Ground Laughing
    Damper on my 950 is 11 clicks in....start in 2nd gear....do at least 35-40mph....


    and yell weeeeeeeeee........


    [​IMG]
    #15
  16. catalina38

    catalina38 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,727
    Location:
    Stingray bay CA.
    Low tire pressure is only going to get you a flat tire and a bent rim. The previous photo shows good body position and be sure to steer with foot pressure not the bars. Look ahead to where you want to go, not down in front of the bike. Going fast will mask bad technique and since you will have to turn or slow down for obstacles at some point you may as well learn to do it right so you can go fast or slow, whichever speed is right for the terrain in front of you.
    #16
  17. traveltoad

    traveltoad Aaron S

    Joined:
    May 8, 2002
    Oddometer:
    6,769
    Location:
    San Fernando Valley
    +1
    #17
  18. Nowwhat

    Nowwhat I'll Go Second...

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,578
    Location:
    On the Ground Laughing
    In that pic my tire pressure is 30F/30R
    #18
  19. Sumi

    Sumi Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,895
    Location:
    Hungary
    +1 on throttle:) get as fast as possible to a minimum of ~50-60km/h (30-40mph).. I also like to keep the rpms at about 5-6k.. then the front will somewhat float on top of the sand, staying on it's path more or less (the bikes momentum keeps it on the path I guess).. some say that it's better if you transfer your weight as back as possible.. It's scary, and I've seen bad accidents in sand.. but you have to build up and maintain speed (I know it doesn't seem logical when you are there, and it's scary), or the front will just wash out. You can kind of feel when you get to the minimum required speed, as the bike keeps going forward, no matter where the front wheel is pointing (ofcourse in limits). Also IMO the tkc front sucks in sand (at least for learning)... but then again the 9x0 also isn't the ultimate "how to learn riding in sand" tool :D

    Edit: Sorry, I've read now, that you've been desert racing.. so nevermind my post:)
    #19
  20. icebergstu

    icebergstu Husqvarna Tragic

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    521
    Location:
    South Australia
    I dont have a 990 but setting you clickers and tyre pressure is the key. It takes 5 minutes and will turn sand from a burden into a pleasure regardless of dampeners.

    CLICKERS:

    COMPRESSION - You need to be 3/4 to maximum hard
    REBOUND - You need to be 3/4 to maximum hard plus 5 clicks (I think the WP have a vast amount of clicks so 5 should do.

    This will keep your front wheel from bouncing too much and get your front wheel pushing back into the sand quickly where all the traction is.

    TYRE PRESSURE:

    Use the rim clean method - Take your front tyre pressure down to say (Big heavy bike hmmmmm) 15psi. Ride for a few hundred meters in dusty sand and if you see a line where the tyre has cleaned the edge of the rim that is the rim clean line. It needs to be about 2mm to be perfect but will vary slightly.

    The pressure will vary from bike to bike, tyre to tyre. There is no set standard PSI

    This Video will help with rim clean

    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/uwfc6MYDSt0" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>

    Try these methods and I am almost positive you will get fantastic results.

    Stu
    #20