School Me On Mtn Bikes (29ers specifically)

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Hardware02, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. Hardware02

    Hardware02 Long timer

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    How about the Giant Revel 0

    [​IMG]
    Supposedly $759 locally...
    #41
  2. inire

    inire Browncoat symp

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    yeh, fixies don't coast. Fine for some, not for me.

    I have a ponderosa 29 that has been a real tank- way better bike than me, good-not-great components, solid performer. Removed the big ring and replaced with a chain guard (never used it, tears up my right calf when having to dance around. Spent under 1k new,.don't regret it.

    Might even be for sale....

    Sent from my SGH-T679 using Tapatalk 2
    #42
  3. Aghartha

    Aghartha Awesome

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    If you're just cruising around town and dirt roads (no hardcore single track), a rigid 29er is a pretty good bike. The Karate Monkey is a good option, but exceeds your budget, though if you're into the idea you can find a frameset and build it yourself in your budget, single speed or 1x10 or 3x10 or whatever you'd prefer.

    The Redline Monocog is a great bike in your budget if you're willing to ride a single speed. They also make the D series with gears and squishy forks, but the component spec doesn't look too hot until the higher end models.

    There's always craigslist.
    #43
  4. Hardware02

    Hardware02 Long timer

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    I went to a local shop and they had the Revel 0 there...with Suntour forks.

    The shops mtn bike guy recommended the Mahuna over the Giant, saying the Kona frame is stronger. He admitted the forks (Suntour) on the Mahuna would be at their limit.

    He checked with the shops mechanic who suggested I steer clear of 29ers altogether (unless I'm willing to go into high end bikes/wheels ($$$$)) and stay with a 26er...which brings me back to my Blast.

    Another option he suggested is the Giant Seek 3.

    [​IMG]

    The only weak link on this bike might be the wheels...but it's not made to jump logs and bash over rocks and I would ride it as a roadbike anyway (as it looks like my Blast is a better offroad bike (in this price range) than I had given it credit).

    The Seek supposedly has an extremely stout frame, rigid forks (I don't mind that) and is cheaper than the Mahuna or Revel.

    Anyone know how hard/$$ it would be to upgrade wheels on that if they did prove to be too weak?
    #44
  5. rob feature

    rob feature Domain Ranger

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    Pretty darn easy. Just buy or build a set that fits and slap it on - no time at all. The $$$ is all up to you. You can dump big money on wheels or you can stay sane. Tire changes are just like moto tires if you used tubed tires in your moto - just much easier. Most of my tires will go on without any tools.
    #45
  6. threadkiller

    threadkiller Semi-feral Pappy

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    I like to see a 36 hole rim on a big guy bike. 32 holers are fine for a while, but the 36 will hold up better, IMHO. Before I lost weight, I would've wrecked a basic 32 hole rim pretty quick.
    #46
  7. Askel

    Askel Perma-n00b

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    Anything that would constitute a significant upgrade over the stock wheels on the class of bike you're looking at will run about $200-$250.

    Deals can be had though if you know what you're looking for and where to look.

    Expect to be pushing $300 if you decide you need 36 spoke rims, they're rarely available off the rack- you usually have to find somebody to build a set for you.
    #47
  8. Hardware02

    Hardware02 Long timer

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    Changing gears slightly (pun intended)...how are Surly frames?

    I'm liking the fat wheeled Surlies in the show-your-bicycle thread...

    How are those fat wheels strength-wise for a ~300lb rider?
    #48
  9. Hardware02

    Hardware02 Long timer

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    Okay...Surlies are wayyy out of my price range...

    Anyway, here's my summary:

    Giant Revel 0:

    - good bike overall
    - front forks could be a weak point
    - 29er wheels could be a weak point
    - mid-priced of the bikes discussed here

    Potential upgrades required later: forks & wheels


    Kona Mahuna:

    - good bike (possibly better frame than the Giant)
    - same issues as Revel...
    - highest priced of the bikes discussed here

    Potential upgrades required later: forks & wheels


    Giant Seek 0:

    - very strong frame
    - no front fork concerns as it's a rigid
    - wheels could be a weak point
    - lowest priced of the bikes discussed here

    Potential upgrades required later: wheels
    #49
  10. huzar

    huzar Pastor of Muppets

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    OK, any thoughts on a geared 29er that can carry a big guy like me (260#) and, say 40# of gear? I have a sentimental attachment to steel. The purpose would be to use this bike as a mountaineering approach bicycle for some of the climbs that are closed to motorized recreation. Keeping it under $1500 would be great, as, since the bikes would be left at times in the woods for a couple of days, there would be a small chance that someone would hike in there with bolt cutters and try and steal them.
    #50
  11. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Long timer

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    I vote for the giant seek. The weak point on most wheels these days are the spokes, everything you are looking at probably have cheap spokes. Don't worry about it much until they start breaking (it will not be catastrophic, you'll just hear a spoke pop, the wheel will go out of true but you'll be able to get home because you have disc brakes). If you are doing mostly road and rails to trails, you should get a year or more until you experience spoke problems.

    When looking for replacement wheels, any decent 29er wheel will fit on that Seek, 29er and 700c are the same and the Seek have 135mm rear drop outs. Find a good wheel builder to build you a set of nice wheels, you might drop 4-500 on them but they will last forever and are the biggest thing you can improve on a bike.
    #51
  12. Hardware02

    Hardware02 Long timer

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    That's the way I'm leaning. Thanks!
    #52
  13. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Long timer

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    Depending on how much clearance you have on that frame, you might be able to put a small 29er tire on the front and back, that will add some suspension if you start to ride rougher trails. Otherwise, don't worry about not having a suspension fork, at the price points you are looking, the forks that come with the bikes are more of a determent than an advantage. When I used to work in a bike shop, one of the hardest thing I had to do was talk people out of wanting suspension for riding rail trails and street. Look at cyclocross bikes and what they do on those things, no suspension.

    After looking at the specs, another good upgrade in the future would be Avid BB7 brakes (don't get the BB5's they are not the same).

    Someday you may want to start riding in the woods and want a mountain bike, keep the seek, it will always be a good around town bike. Someone your size, you would have to buy a $1500ish hard tail mountain bike that will hold up. The Seek will get you riding for much less money.
    #53
  14. fourthree

    fourthree Adventurer

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    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/hardrock/hardrockdisc29
    My local bike shop (LBS) sells several of these. Looks like a decent bike to test the waters with. If you really get into it, you will likely outgrow it quickly though. There are many choices in your price range, the deciding factor should be the shop you buy from. Choose a shop that you feel comfortable with, that treats you well, or you just like the "feel" of the place, and I am certain they will have, or be able to get something that will work well for you.
    Also, I wouldn't worry too much about your weight when choosing a bike. I would argue that someone your size puts LESS stress on a bike than a fit fast 150 lb rider, the fit guy is going to put more watts into the drivetrain, accelerating wear, and he's also going to hit things with more speed and frequency than you likely will, so I think it evens out in the end.
    Just be honest with yourself and your bike shop about what you want to do with this bike, and look as far into the future as you can about where you want to ride. Do you see yourself loading camping gear on this bike and wandering off into the woods for several days? Do you see yourself bombing down hills and jumping off rocks and such? Or rather, would you ride it to the grocery store, the bank or whatever? Or maybe just a simple, relaxing ride on a bike path.
    I think these factors come into play much more than your weight.
    #54
  15. fourthree

    fourthree Adventurer

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    Surly Ogre.
    #55
  16. Askel

    Askel Perma-n00b

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    I run about 240 right now. Wouldn't hesitate to load my Fargo up with 50lbs of gear and hit the trails. I got mine put together for less than $1000, but that took some careful shopping.

    Bonus, the first gens are kind of camo colored. :lol3

    [​IMG]
    #56
  17. HOT DAMN!

    HOT DAMN! ♪ ♪ ♪

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    I likes my FELT Nine Sport, picked up on Craigslist for cheap as it was only ridden on the street twice then hung in the garage.

    Good Price HERE

    Review HERE

    Smiles here...

    [​IMG]
    #57
  18. Hardware02

    Hardware02 Long timer

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    I went to the nearest Surly dealer. They had two on the floor. A Moonlander (med frame) and a Neck Romancer (small frame).

    The Moonlander's stickered at $2800. :eek1

    The shop guy said a large frame would suit me. He assured me the Surly frame & wheels are more than up to the job of handling my weight.

    He gave me the owner's XL Moonlander to ride around the parking lot. I love that bike!

    It's totally different...sounds like an ATV or an off-road buggy rolling on the pavement.

    I want one!

    They'd have to order in a large frame...said they could put it on the road for me @ $2300 (+ tax).

    Let's see...

    2,300.00 x 1.13 = 2,599.00


    $2,599 + ~$200,000 (the cost of dividing assets & approx alimony) = $200,2599.
    #58
  19. RxZ

    RxZ Legal Drug Dealer

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    HAHA!

    I thought he was outside Atlanta, near their big "Rock" (Stone Mountain)! :rofl
    #59
  20. Range Motorsport

    Range Motorsport Junk collector

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    The majority of spokes that break are the high end triple butted or double butted 1.5 or 1.7 spokes. The cheap stainless 2.0 spokes are the strongest of the bunch. Most of your weakness in a wheel comes from a soft flimsy rim and improper tension. Get a good rim and straight stainless spokes and you can a make a strong wheel. If you are going to load up the wheel with even more weight get a 36H wheelset.

    Your tires play just as much of a role in keeping your wheel in shape as they are the primary suspension for your rims.
    #60