Scottoiler forumevangelism

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Hicks, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    ...

    because some local forum members are even more spray-conservative than guys on our CZ forum I'll put some serious propaganda in here :D

    I claim, that Scottoiler:

    - changes how the bike behaves by visibly lowering the chain friction
    - - quicker responses to the throttle
    - - a bit lower enging-braking
    - reduces a lot of chain twitching-the ride is MUCH more smooth and kardan-like = you can use lower rpm range comfortably
    - significiantly prolonges chain-tension maintenance intervals
    - prolonges chain life by several times
    - makes only a light mess
    - doesn't require the chain to be cleaned(!) -- the cloth once a 500-1000km is sufficient
    - with LubeTube it has refill interval ~8000+ km

    I talk about onroard use.

    ---

    photos follow :)
    #1
  2. señormoto

    señormoto Supermoto Abuser

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,110
    Location:
    California + Costa Rica
    Nice try, troll.
    #2
  3. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    there will always be a lost cases, I'm not naive ;)

    Anyway you said that Scottoiler is "a terrible product" -- so I wonder if you even properly care about YOUR chain... will you post a pic? Do you clean it regularly?
    #3
  4. Indy Unlimited

    Indy Unlimited Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,496
    Location:
    Parker, CO
    I run the scottoiler "e" version., very happy. It pays for itself in chain life.
    The only issues I have had were I had to seal the controller face from rain and spray washing.
    Rubber lines are poor quality and crack and leak in the sun after one year.
    The hard plastic lines are great. I use penetrating oil for a lubricant. The pump does not like heavy oils.
    #4
  5. CrazyMike

    CrazyMike ***42***

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    945
    Location:
    South Cackalacka
    30,000 miles on my stock chain with Scott-Oiler, both on-road and off-road use. All I do is wash the bike after off-road paying attention to the chain and all is still good.
    #5
  6. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    what is good? :D

    it is most likely irregularly elongated... I bet.. for 90%.

    Put it to the main stand, rotate slowly the wheel and check the chain slack...

    Irregularly elongated chain harms the wheelwork before that.
    #6
  7. señormoto

    señormoto Supermoto Abuser

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,110
    Location:
    California + Costa Rica
    Here's my nice clean old chain @10k miles that I just took off. No hard links, oiled regularly, cleaned regularly.
    [​IMG]

    Here's my nice new chain. I even care enough about my chain to replace it before it's worn.
    [​IMG]

    I do ride a fair amount offroad so an oiler is sort of like suicide for my chains. Maybe if I bought a dual sport bike and only rode it on highways and pavement I would be saying the oiler had a benefit, but that is not the case. Modern o-ring chains are made to lubricate themselves internally, with only cleaning the rollers and applying light teflon to the outer surfaces being required at most. A constant oil bath for modern chains is equivalent to riding around town while wearing a diaper. :lol3
    #7
  8. señormoto

    señormoto Supermoto Abuser

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,110
    Location:
    California + Costa Rica
    +1, that's all that's needed for a healthy chain :D
    #8
  9. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    I got you :)

    You've just proven that you dont know much about the o/x ring chains.

    The truth is that only a PART of the o-ring chain is internally lubricated from the factory. But there is still an internal surface, WHICH MUST be oiled.
    #9
  10. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    The KEY and MUST is to put a lube between a roller and inner sideplate.


    [​IMG]
    #10
  11. blackfly911

    blackfly911 Meat Popsicle

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2010
    Oddometer:
    168
    Location:
    Ottawa, ON

    This is beginning to look like a tire/oil thread.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    I'm indifferent to the Scott Oiler (although have looked into them in tha past), I use a spray lube and am totally satisfied with it BUT..... your sig would imply that you've got 115k on 5 chains, others have the same distance on two or three.... just saying! Does the manufacturer of Scott Oiler make the same claims/observations as you? If they're valid then they're missing on some great sales potential!<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>


    [​IMG]
    #11
  12. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    I spoke about the VERY basic stock (CZ) chain with several BMW dealers, including the really renowned one in Regensburg and they told me -- 16 000km typical lifetime, 20 000 km max.

    My chains:

    1) original 2008 stock o-ring -- malfunctioned -- o-rings shattered & gone in ~20kkm (these chains were later recalled)
    2) same 2008 stock o-ring -- malfunctioned in the same way in ~18 000 km
    3) DID 525 ZVM2 -- about 35kkm
    4) BMW recall -- stock o-ring, changed after est. 20kkm
    6) CZ X-ring 525 SDZ currently ~25kkm... all the time under scottoiler -- only slightly worn

    I've of course consulted chain care almost everywhere.. including directly with the CZ-chains manufacturer/insider.. so I did it right... it looks like a my particular.. maybe sporty riding style + city.

    Anyway -- the behaviour of my bike with Scottoiler doesnt collide with info on their website or (similar) experience of my friends.

    Have to add, that we're discussing the ONROAD use.
    #12
  13. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    btw: also have to say, that people often change their chains after they're long gone... besides that DID, I changed the other chains +- on time.
    #13
  14. GH41

    GH41 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Oddometer:
    822
    Let me ask the OP again. Hicks, are you a stock holder? How can that device do anything I can't do? How does the oiler put oil on every inch of your chain while riding down the road? The oiler may work but I don't understand what it does that I can't. Does it use majic oil? How much does the majic oil cost? I guess if a person is too sorry to lubricate his chain it might be worth something to him. GH
    #14
  15. señormoto

    señormoto Supermoto Abuser

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,110
    Location:
    California + Costa Rica
    Let's see your cost comparison here since you're desperately trying to sell more of these oilers. I want to see a control-based study where you prove that the cost of purchasing and maintaining the Oiler saves a person money in the long run by making the chain last longer over a period of time (or distance). If your list of chains (or whatever study you're basing this off of) there doesn't prove how many more miles a person would get by using the oiler (and thus proves that the oiler maintained chain has a higher mileage to cost ratio) then your reasons and argument is basically null/void.

    Either prove the benefit or admit that your statements are all conjecture and opinion based on nothing other than preference and product lust.

    Well, you've just proven you're good at assumptions and not paying attention to what other people say. I never said that chains don't need lubrication, I said that slathering oil all over them via the ScottOiler is unnecessary and dirty. Besides, if you ever go offroad you're looking at a chain covered in filth, grime, sand, dirt and everything else that sticks to oil; thus making the equivalent of semi-liquid sandpaper all rotating and wearing your chain down.

    If you don't ever ride offroad with your F8/F658 then I feel sorry for you and I wonder why you bothered buying one of these bikes. So, have fun trying to convince people that your snake oil is useful, but you should remember that you care more about this topic than the people that don't use the garbage product.

    Why did you start this thread anyway - do you really care if other people go out and buy the product or are you just trying to start *another* useless thread where opinions about irrelevant topics are hashed out over and over and over again? Was there any real benefit for other forum members you were aiming at here, because I don't see the point of your post unless you have a vested interest in seeing other people buy the ScottOiler. :huh

    +1, get 'em! :deal
    #15
  16. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    Jesus, why should I be a stock holder? I'm wannabe stockholder at max :D

    I dont understand why you dont understand, that oiling every 50-60 seconds is something you can do by yourself?

    The oiler puts oil on the every inch, at least according to my observation.

    And yes.. the oil is much different.. because it's not oil+glue as in spray, but only an oil which lubricates the chain and then departs with dirt.

    ---

    the price here is about 15USD per 0,5L or so? 0,5 is for maybe 20 000 km.

    The oil is cheaper... but not the device.. so I think it saves $$$ when you ride a lot.

    --

    ad. chain lubing: I ride ~130-200 km DAILY... combined with rain, it's quite a lot of chain care... especially when you have better things to do and/or when you're late etc.
    #16
  17. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    nah I'm not. The only thing I'm saying that it deserves people attention, because it is ubercool.

    You've mixed several issues into one.

    a) I'm not going to convince you in any way... have better things to do than watering a dried tree stub :)
    b) Google for yourself.. there are many stories how it radically prolonges the chain life
    c) I've never had financial motive with Scottoiler.. so in general... I dont care much about savings


    again.. you dont know much what are you talking about. The scottoiler injects oil on the side of the procket, then it is pushed with centrifugal force +- just between the inner plate and the roller


    And also.. the Scottoil also HAVE A CLEANING role. It doesnt stay dirty all the time.

    I've repeated several times that I don't believe much about Scottoiler use for a pure and hard offroad.

    They offer a double injection though...

    You're not much a open-minded guy, right? Who says that 800GS has to be ridden offroad? It's AN UNIVERSAL bike for the first.

    Look... clever guy ;) ... if I'd be serious about offroad.. I'd stick with 990. So I can argument in a similar way -- why do you changed half of your bike? It's designed for offroad, isnt it? :D

    The argument, that anyone has to use the 800GS in the same way as you is.. really.. incredibly stupid. Especially for me.. I bet I spent on the bike much more time, than you.

    I think there are a lot of other stuff you really dont understand as well... so :p
    #17
  18. señormoto

    señormoto Supermoto Abuser

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,110
    Location:
    California + Costa Rica
    Oh boy, an internet pissing match! Fun! :lol3

    Sure, call me close minded but if I wanted a bike just for the road I wouldn't buy one that was designed for dual sport use. Of all the bikes I've owned the F800GS, aside from my dirtbikes, is the worst choice for 100% road use. I only have it because the 690 sucks for highway use to get to the places I need to ride. You're probably the kind of guy, and they are SO common, that buy an SUV to drive to the grocery store and never take it offroad yet you need those tough looking Mud/AT tires right? :lol3

    I'm a pragmatist, I choose the right tool for the job and the F800GS is not, by engineering principles, the right tool for 100% road use. There are better motos, and if you like the F800 platform then you could have gone with the F800R or F800ST.

    If you want to argue, like a lot of people do, that you can do whatever you want with your bike then you're right and that's not the point I'm trying to make. I'm saying it's a poor choice because there are better options, but do whatever you want -- I really don't care. I do like to argue on the internet though, you can ask other people on this forum, so we can keep this going as long as you want.

    What I don't like is the scott oiler. No amount of fancy graphics from their site will convince me (or a lot of people) that there is any benefit that a can of chain lube will not solve. Unless you can prove via controlled study, either your own or from the manufacturer, that there is a concrete cost benefit to owning this product then you have no platform to stand on and you should consider getting off the soapbox as you're using circular logic at this point. :deal
    #18
  19. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    I'm much worse :p

    that's a nonsense. The only real and reasonable alternative for me is 12GS, which design I didnt like.

    The only version of 12GS I really want, is 30years GS (that on the black rims etc).

    I simply didnt like the design of any 2008 12GS.

    ---

    that was for the first.

    For the second -- you really dont know what you're talking about? Have you even ridden an european 3rd grade road? It's paved, but with incredible holes, sometimes gravel... something like a MX grade surface. For example for a large parts of eastern Slovakia or Bosnia.. thats a norm. >200mm fork travel VERY usable.

    Also, I commute daily through a really nice small roads to the Prague...

    R or ST is ABSOLUTELY not for me. Have you ever sit on one? It's much mor prone to a damage when it falls etc.. many disadvantages.

    The only way how I leave for a longer trips ALWAYS with a PASSENGER, OVERLOADED with panniers, tankbag, bags ON the PANNIERS... the R or ST is really not for me:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Cafe Eustacchio Rome :)

    So I really dont know where you got your confidence to judge HOW I use the 800GS.

    Your argument of dual-purpose is a bit weird.. with its default suspension.. who said that BMW expected the 800GS to be used in a harsh offroad?


    which better options exactly?

    that "provide stamped study" forum tactic is well known.. and as I said... I'm trustful and honest enough to take my experience with Scottoiler seriously :sweeti :D
    #19
  20. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Prague, CZ
    and also another KEY advantage of 800GS.

    it doesnt change the handling characteristics under high load (I mean rider + passenger + panniers + tankbag + bags + canisters).

    But maybe.. you like it like that :D especially for a passenger -- your recommended 800R would be real delight... across the europe on the street bike.

    Great advice, really...

    edit:
    useful payload 800GS: 236 kg
    800R: 206kg
    800ST: 196kg

    really great advice... on every trip we're well over 200kg payload.

    [​IMG]
    #20