Scottoiler - Thoughts or Problems?

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by AdvRat, Jan 20, 2011.

  1. AdvRat

    AdvRat Adventurer

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    I was wondering how many of you have one of the Scottoiler systems installed on their bike - either the electronic (esystem) or vacuum (vsystem)? I guess any of the oiling systems on the market today? I know there are a couple of the adventure touring companies that recommend them for their customers who use a chain drive bike. So I didn't know if it was something to think about installing on a 990 Adventure.

    There are so many pluses & minuses about the need to oil an o-ring chain but I'm sure there are a lot of pluses when it comes to either road use and wet conditions or even cleaning the chain in dirt use.

    If anyone can chime in on it if you're using one of the oiling systems that would be great. Either the quality of the system, installation issues or if the electronic or vacuum ones are better or worse. Thanks
    #1
  2. DeeGee

    DeeGee I'm a Yorkshireman thanoz

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    I have a scott oiler fitted on my current Adventure, it's the touring set up where the oil reservoir tucks behind the number plate and I'm happy with the system.

    I had a pro-oiler fitted on my last Adventure( www.pro-oiler.com) which I swapped over from my Ducati before I traded it in. I thought this was a better system as it worked by a pulse pump when the wheels were rotating and you could alter the oil feed via a control which I fixed to the dash.

    Both systems IMO prolong the chain and sprocket life, but I do mainly ride on tarmac with the occasional rally/Enduro competition.

    If you rode the dessert mostly I reckon it would shorten the chain and sprocket life as it would form an abrasive paste and wear and tear would hasten.

    My two penneth. HTH
    #2
  3. Zuber

    Zuber Zoob

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    Had the Scott oiler on a Tri-tiger. Chain lasted 45k miles when I sold it. It may still be going. I had the one with the large res under the license plate and only one hose to the rear sprocket. Only had to fill it once a year, used ATF mostly. I think this is a great thing for clean street bikes.

    Not so for a dual-sport bike. That little bit of oil would not be enough to flush off a dirty chain. It would be like gluing dirt/sand on the chain. For DS I use a grunge brush and lots of cheap gear oil. Brush and oil after a big meal of dirt/dust. This really keeps the chain clean. Oil is easy to wash off the bike compaired to chain lube. I said could be cleaned, but I rarely do. The stock chain on the 950 Adv went about 30k miles, when three links gave up.
    #3
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  4. Corni

    Corni Adventurer

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    If you were driving mostly in sandy conditions its better not to have oiler, in my opinion... The amount of sand-oil paste that is forming on chain, sprockets and surrounding area is no way washable by any oiler in sensible way.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    If it's tarmac that you mostly drive then those oilers are good choice.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    #4
  5. scottmctag

    scottmctag Well travelled

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    Stealth super srpox (rear), renthal 16 tooth front, D.I.D X ring chain, good chain lube( I use putoline products ) ( specific for sand/mud dependant on conditions ) and you can ride anywhere and get massive long life without the problem of it dumping oil everywhere or choking up, IMHO :1drink


    This is the link for off road bike products they do all motorcycle products oils and lubricants, Quality, used the for at least 12 years never been let down.

    http://www.putoline.com/en/products/catalogue/segp_offroad/pchmp/
    #5
  6. bungycool

    bungycool Adventurer

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    any of you use ptfe- dry lube?
    supposed to be really good but my chain flash rusted almost immediatly???wtf:huh
    #6
  7. scottmctag

    scottmctag Well travelled

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    #7
  8. uscincpac

    uscincpac Adventurer

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    Never used auto-oilers before, always weighed up £5 for a bottle of chain lube against £100 scottoiler :wink:

    But then got my current 990 with scottoiler already fitted. And.. its awesome.

    Next to maintenance free on tarmac and doesnt create that grinding paste that normal chain lube eventually collects.

    Useless in the sand/mud of course, but just manually clean and re-lube the chain afterwards and you're in business.
    #8
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  9. Tangoman

    Tangoman Adventurer

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    I agree that the benefit of a Scottoiler is a vastly extended chain/sprocket life if the bike is used mainly on the road. I have had the touring/dual nozzle version on the bike since 2004 and it's still on the original chain & sprockets - currently 37k miles (in all weathers) and plenty of wear left.
    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p> </o:p>
    The installation problems I had were:
    1. The oil tank sits between the rear mudguard and the number plate. When mounted it pushes the number plate back beyond the reach of the number plate light so a spacer has to be inserted between the mudguard and the light unit to move the light backwards so it can still illuminate the number plate.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    2. Although the dual nozzle body fits neatly inside the chainguide mount (sitting on the forward chainguard mounting nut and facing backwards), the hole on one side of the nozzle body has to be slightly widened to accommodate the fixed chainguard mounting nut. Some people may have found a better mounting location?
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Finally, the oiler is.... oily!! The front sprocket area and rear wheel are always grimy and oily where oil is flung off - even if the oiler is adjusted to super-stingy mode (but hey, the rear spokes remain rust free!). Also the front path has developed a bonny-style oil patch under the bike.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    If I ever get a new bike I'm not sure whether I would fit another oiler. Apart from the above probs, this is mainly because, over recent years, I have come to believe that the fewer gadgets on the bike (that could potentially fail) the better. Anyway, the weekly chain inspection/lubrication routine doesn't seem like too much of a chore.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    (Pics available if required).
    #9
  10. markie_wales

    markie_wales Been here awhile

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    I've had them on a bunch of road bikes and am a big and if I could see how to fit on to the front sprocket of the SE, I'd have on in a heart beat. I don't fancy running the delivery pipe down the swing arm, as some of my "churning through the bracken" would almost certainly rip it off.

    cheers

    Markie
    #10
  11. Ballon

    Ballon Adventurer

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    I very pleased with mine, I ride all year round and its worked brilliantly.
    #11
  12. Ni3ous

    Ni3ous Double Axle Rider

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    I had Esystem on ADV 990, when sold it, I fitted it on Tenere. I ride a lot dirty enduro and for my kind of riding the system did not meet my expectations.
    Had problems with oiling. was never sure if its working, sometimes the mud jammed the nozzle, sometimes some brnch teared of the nozzle when riding in woods, once it was cought between chain and sprocket... than I removed it, and now I use chain spray.
    But I think for on road use its ok. eSystem has lots of gadgets, but vacuum system is made simple and will last longer couse its not sensitive.
    Considering price I think scottoiler systemsare not build very quality.

    Might worth check price/performance with other companyes.
    #12
  13. Twinz

    Twinz Been here awhile

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    I have one on my Futura and generally like it. downside = messy.
    #13
  14. mousitsas

    mousitsas Long timer

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    I would only buy again an automatic oiler if it only had some sort of temperature sensor to account for temp related oil viscosity changes. Otherwise its a pain to re-adjust every time you are on a trip and you experience even moderate temperature differences.
    #14
  15. uscincpac

    uscincpac Adventurer

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    You can stick the metering reservoir near the engine/exhaust so you will get consistent temps after 5 mins - not too near though :wink:
    #15
  16. mousitsas

    mousitsas Long timer

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    Smart! :D
    #16
  17. DocAxeYarYar

    DocAxeYarYar RideDualSport.com

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    My brother runs a Scott Oiler on his KLR and it works great overall. We used to run these in Seattle in the 1980's and the new design is much improved. The Scott Oiler can get overwhelmed in really dusty conditions, but a quick spray with some chain lube gets it cleaned off. On our ride from Austin to Big Bend Nat park, about 1,200 miles round trip he never needed to use chain lube. The Oiler took care of it all!

    [​IMG]
    #17
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  18. Mully

    Mully Kineticist

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    I've had mixed results with auto-lubers: excellent on my Interceptor (25K miles @ 100% road), so-so on my `04 950 (14K @10~15% dirt).

    I've had good results with common gear oil: a drop on the side of each roller at the link plate every 400 miles seems to quiet and smooth the chain, and life is good. Ten minutes to apply, less mess than an auto-luber, and similar chain life. FWIW. YMMV. Other Usual Disclaimers. :deal

    mully
    #18
  19. geometrician

    geometrician let's keep going...

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    I have a ScotOiler on my KLR650, 170,000 miles, I have to adjust the chain about twice a year now...

    I bought my first one after I saw what they did- a friend mounted one to his Yamaha FZR1000 and did the Cabo 1000 down Baja (& back!) and did not have to adjust his chain at all- as a matter of fact it was so clean it was unreal, he had no sling on his rims... I was sold.

    as far as viscosity vs. temperature, the small (original) capacity version only lasts 200-500 miles, so unless you ride in July and then wait until February to ride again, adjustment for that is not an issue.

    As for riding in dirty conditions, it explains in the instructions that you simply turn it up and the extra oil washes the chain clean. I usually wait until I am back on tarmac where I am going to be spinning the chain fast and continously to do this, then after a mile or two turn the thing back down. I have mine mounted so I can reach down with my clutch hand and turn it all the way up, then back to normal without having to stop. My chain looks clean & new, while the rest of the bike is caked with mud & dirt. They work GREAT for dualsports! :norton

    I did manage to eat one of the dual injectors (nice piece) but that was because I was trying to get fancy with my mounting and it moved into the chain eventually. My fault, not its.

    As for what they can do to extend chain life and reduce adjustments, I don't see why we all don't have some sort of system as the chain is one critical (and consumable!) item on our bikes
    #19
  20. zedtours

    zedtours Been here awhile

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    After having a Scott on my road bikes with great success, fitted to Adventure and nothing but problems.I don't think they work well with a twin [wrong vacuum pulses?] the touring reservoir is to heavy for mudguard when off road needing a brace and it continually stops working in mud. Looking for alternate oiler?
    #20