SEAT - South East Adventure Trail

Discussion in 'GPS Tracks - Northeast, Southeast & Florida' started by NorthernTraveler, May 10, 2017.

  1. shortordercook

    shortordercook Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2013
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    Got 'em. Thanks. I'm dipping my toe into smartphone navigation with osmand--your tracks will get me started.
    #41
  2. shortordercook

    shortordercook Adventurer

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    Oct 1, 2013
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    i downloaded the standard .gpx file, and this is what displays on google earth. Looks like a different collection of tracks other than the SEAT. Or it could be operator error--this is new stuff for me. Could someone else take a look at the standard gpx file and see what tracks show up? thanks.

    upload_2017-9-23_11-38-6.jpeg
    #42
  3. CloudSplitter

    CloudSplitter Putterer

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    Northern West Virginia
    shortorder, just downloaded the gpx file, and it worked fine in Basecamp. Don't know whether NorthernTraveler replaced the file, or you messed up. Sometimes people try to use the file, or close their browser, before the download is finished. Or maybe the tracks are on there, but you're seeing something you loaded into Google Earth, previously. It keeps all your old stuff, unless you delete it, and the SEAT tracks are mostly southeast of the area on your map.

    Edit: Or maybe the problem is with Google Earth. I just tried looking at this file with it, and couldn't get control of Google Earth Pro. If you have a Garmin GPS that has maps on it, you can download Garmin Basecamp for free (google it) and it can use the maps on your GPS to view them on your computer. May take a bit of fiddling to get Basecamp to use the USB cable to see the GPS.
    .
    #43
  4. turbomax

    turbomax Adventurer

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    Marietta, ga
    This looks awesome! I am going to start some day trips from savannah.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    #44
  5. PittsDriver

    PittsDriver Been here awhile

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    Annapolis, MD
    I downloaded the latest and imported into Basecamp - works fine.
    #45
  6. shortordercook

    shortordercook Adventurer

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    I tried it again with google earth, and I'm convinced both that I got the entire SEAT and that google earth sucks.

    Northern Traveler--thanks for your support. This is good stuff, and I imagine it consumed quite a bit of your time. My hat is off to you.

    Others--thanks for the backup. I won't hijack this thread further--I'll move along to one of the "how to GPS for dummies" threads.
    #46
  7. Aarone1972

    Aarone1972 What have I been riding pavement for 30 years!?!?

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2009
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    Location:
    West Georgia
    I just spent 3 days on the SEAT!

    My best buddy of 30 years and I have ridden everything imaginable in the motorcycle world , however it never dawned on us to ride a dual sport. Shortly after watching the long way round/down the thought started prercolating that we should be riding in the dirt.

    We are both adventuresome, outdoor guys. We both have served time in uniform (his green and mine blue). So it was a short 10 years later that we both had our "adventure rides". Marty got a KLR and I a DR 650.

    By the way, we live 900 miles apart!! Marty loaded up his KLR and drove to Georgia and we took off on the SEAT on September 30. We rode from Brunswick area to North Georgia, and took the slab back to my home in Columbus.

    Mile 3 was a crash course in off road riding (literally). Somehow in 30 +years of asphalt riding I forgot what I learned as a 13 year old on a dirt bike..... The front tire moves all over the place!!!! Soft sand and deep gravel got the pucker factor up for sure and we kept it real slow and easy. Some deep sand and the extra weight of the KLR caused Marty to slide off the road and land oh so gently in a ditch on the side of the road. It was the most graceful crash I have ever seen. After a few embarrassing pictures we were back on the road, excuse me dirt.

    We leaned a lot over the next few hours and we're downright proficient within 100 miles.

    After a late start and 120 miles we camped in Millen Georgia at Magnolia Springs State Park. No complaints at all, nice place clean bathrooms. A freeze dried dinner and some apple pie flavored whiskey by a campfire brought on 8 hours of reasonably good sleep ( I'm going to invest in a thicker camping pad now that I have 650 CC's pulling me around. )

    The next day we doubledmileage and made about 250 miles. The morning was a boring ride through Augusta on pavement but things turned to dirt in the day started looking even better by evening we were in North Georgia and I wondered why we ever even started out in Brunswick. North Georgia was amazing and it lived up to all my expectations regarding dual sport riding dirt rocks gravel Jeep trails, and stream crossings. Day 3 was more of the same.

    I know what a drug addict feels like after his first hit, and I knew I was addicted to dual sport riding.
    Our confidence and skills grew and we were having a blast. We camped at Tallulah State Park our second night and had a much needed shower and a satisfiying meal of Mac and cheese and hot dogs over the fire.

    We rode about 350 miles the third day. This includes a 150 mile highway ride home (yuck). When I wasn't daydreaming about what GPS to buy, or what aftermarket seat I want/ need all I could think was why did I wait so long to get a dual sport!?!?!

    And all week since I have been a back home all I can do is think, how soon can I get back on the trail!!!!

    Thanks to whoever's put the SEAT together. This was an awesome adventure for two old friends a long time in the making.
    #47
  8. NorthernTraveler

    NorthernTraveler Long time Adventurer

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    Glad you enjoyed it.
    Actually, it probably was good that you started in Brunswick..... an easy lead-in to what was to come later. That section is probably the most boring of the whole loop, there is a wide variety of terrain along the way. Go back and finish the loop as you have time, you won't be disappointed.

    I spent a few years in green myself, the last year and a half as a motorcycle recon scout (on a Rokon RT- II, 1977-78).
    #48
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  9. CloudSplitter

    CloudSplitter Putterer

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    Northern West Virginia
    I loved the SEAT, too. Was going to do the whole thing at once, but chickened out when Hurricane Irma and I seemed to be heading for the same spot. Recommend you get your buddy back to Georgia, next spring, and finish it. It has the best organized GPS data of all the adventure rides I've done. After you finish the SEAT, you'll be ready for the TAT, which might pass nearer your buddy's home. If you do that in sections, skip Mississippi and Oklahoma till last. Both are boring, compared to the great rides in other states.

    Anyway, to take your comment about getting a GPS out of context, I wanted to recommend a couple choices. I've gone through many GPSs, starting, in the old days, with one that couldn't show a road map, but could show your track on a black screen. Getting up to date then, I'm now very happy with my Garmin Montana 680T, but knew when I bought it that I'd need to also get City Navigator North America (actually I didn't technically NEED to, as the free maps from Garmin.OpenStreetMap.nl are actually better for showing all the little dirt roads. The T, in 690T, means they come with Topo maps of the whole USA, but I've seldom found the topo maps useful.

    Long story short, I didn't realize, when I upgraded to the Montana, last year, that there was still a reasonably priced Garmin Zumo available. The Zumo 395LM is still available from suppliers such as Amazon, is less expensive than the Montana, comes with Lifetime Map updates (City Navigator North America -- which includes their most detailed rural roads), has a slightly larger screen than the Montana, and is designed for motorcycle use. The Montana ends up virtually requiring you to buy Garmin's rugged mount, because it doesn't work well when getting power from a normal power cable, while bouncing around on a motorcycle.

    Keep enjoying that dual sport.
    .
    #49
  10. viper522

    viper522 Been here awhile

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    Jan 2, 2012
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    WNC
    I drove a section of SE03 this week - particularly the Little Creek Rd and Max Patch Rd portions (headed to Max Patch bald for harvest moon). I don't know if they were recently serviced or what, but the entire surface is 2" loose rock that I know I wouldn't enjoy on a bike. None of it was packed down. It was crazy rough. Maybe that's normal winter preparation?
    #50
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  11. blalor

    blalor Been here awhile

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    RVA
    Not to turn this into a GPS thread, but the 395 is a current model; the 390 is discontinued, but still available as a refurb from gpscity (and others) for significantly less.
    #51
  12. CloudSplitter

    CloudSplitter Putterer

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    Northern West Virginia
    Good call. I recommend staying off that deep, loose, rock until next spring, at the earliest. Rode all of that in early September, and it was great, then, but when I was riding the TAT in 2014, most of Mississippi was covered in closer to three inches of large, loose, gravel, and it was no fun. The ruts were only about an inch deep, but that was enough to grab the wheel and send you into the deeper stuff
    #52
  13. CloudSplitter

    CloudSplitter Putterer

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    I see you're right. When I bought my Montana, Garmin's web site listed neither the 390 nor the 395. Maybe they were between models at the time, so they showed no reasonably priced ones.

    By the way, if you have good eyes, and want to save some money, consider a Garmin GPSMAP 78. available for about half the price of the Zumo 395 and Montana (but needs a map file, as does the Montana). The 78 is a better choice than the GPSMAP 64, because the antenna can be broken off the 64, and the 78 floats. Other wise they're the same. I don't recommend trying to get by with a nuvi, as they aren't waterproof, and can't use the more rugged, round, connectors that the 64 and 78 can. I still carry my GPSMAP 78, as a backup, and upload all the tracks and routes to it, as well.
    #53
  14. N22WLZ

    N22WLZ Been here awhile

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    Oct 24, 2014
    Oddometer:
    202
    I just finished the first 7 or 8 sections to the gulf and cannot wait to ride again (preferably with company). The track was friendly to my bigger GSA and definitely as entertaining as the TAT (east of Colorado). Loaded into my Montana easily through basecamp, huge thanks to all the work that has been put into this track!
    #54
  15. worncog

    worncog YBNormal

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Oddometer:
    300
    Location:
    Florida Panhandle
    Maybe a late fall SEAT Rolling Rally?? What you say?

    Been wanting to ride it for a while, and with no big rides on the calendar till next April/May/June. No better excuse than the combination of need and opportunity.
    #55