Serious photographers: which gear to bring?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by longslowdistance, Mar 13, 2017.

  1. Plawa

    Plawa dןǝɥ puǝs

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    I don't know that they will actually make any difference if the space they are in is not completely airtight... I think they will just saturate with air humidity and will do nothing to protect the camera
    #61
  2. mikegc

    mikegc Long timer

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    I suppose I could lock my neighbor's little rat dog in the Jesse top box to see if it's air tight.:D (I'm just kidding!!!) The little beast has bitten me three times. If it is, in fact, air tight, I could leave the 50 silica packets on the shelf.

    Mike
    #62
  3. UncleLimpy

    UncleLimpy let's get lost

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    I can't imagine traveling with a 5D; I'm a Sony guy but one of my friends has a 5DMkiii and the thing is a tank of a camera. Like you mentioned, I can get very similar photos with my a6000 as I can my a7, but it might take a bit more fiddling. The size jump from the a6000 to the a7 is pretty minimal relative to your options, but even so I still take the a6000.

    If you're birding or doing a specific type of shot, then you already know what you need to accomplish your mission, but for general photography and beautiful landscapes, a compact DSLR with a kit lens (or a couple wide primes) will do the trick. I like my 16-50mm kit lens because it's tiny and versatile, and a 35mm f1.8 for night/starlight photography. I also have my gopro for shots on the move, and my Galaxy S7 does very well for what it is, especially when I can shoot RAW and post in lightroom.

    One of the guys mentioned leaving the tripod at home - and I get it - but I take one with me. I forget the specific model but it is a travel one and stands maybe 4ft tall. Packs up nice. I use it for shooting the stars when I'm able. Short of that though, I shoot handheld for everything. As much as I love my speedlights, I leave those at home. I bring the a6000, kit lens, 35 f/1.8 (and adaptor already mated to it), tripod, case, 3 batteries w/ usb charger, and 3 SD cards. Takes up very little room and allows me to take great shots. If it's a weekend trip I bring the a7 with maybe a zoom if I feel like I'll use it, but when I'm packing everything it's the little guy that comes with me. Motorcycling is hobby 1, and I try not to let my secondary hobby inhibit that.

    and actually, I'll be riding to Newfoundland mid august as well from Nebraska! it'll be the a6000 with me!
    #63
  4. Erinaceous

    Erinaceous ...................O#O

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    ...not one GoPro comment!?!?!?!

    On the last ride I took the Canon 80D with 18-135. Will take tripod next time and one less fish pole.
    #64
  5. Plawa

    Plawa dןǝɥ puǝs

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    I think the name of the thread makes it quite clear why there's no mention of GoPro..
    #65
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  6. sttr

    sttr n00b

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    Hey,
    That’s what I take
    Nikon D610
    16-35mm F4 - Landscape
    20mm 1.8 - Milky way, Star trailing …
    28-300mm - for the Rest
    Travel Tripod
    Poli filter
    ND filter 1000x
    Lens cleaning stuff
    Laptop with Photo software

    I know that is a fair amount but I want high quality pictures. If you don’t want to take pics in low light you could use MFT (Micro Four Thirds).
    Some people can take amazing pics with their mobile…unfortunately I’m not one of them ;)

    Happy travells...
    #66
  7. Dan Lorenze

    Dan Lorenze Adventurer

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    I'm an iPhone guy.. I've found that with my riding style I'm always on the run and don't have much time to stop and smell the roses (and take pics).


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    #67
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  8. walbert1

    walbert1 Adventurer

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    slightly off-topic, but is there a good thread in which to get feedback/tips on our photos for those of us looking to improve?
    #68
  9. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    #69
    walbert1 likes this.
  10. Jahx

    Jahx Adventurer

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    Are you planning on shooting to sell?

    Or are you just shooting for you?

    On my trip this summer I took a Nikon coolpix b500, and I'm glad I skipped the DSLR - I took 1400 pictures, because I could just pop it out of the tank bag, and operate it with my gloves on.

    1500265332250.jpg 1500262583423.jpg

    Are theey professional quality? Heck no. But they are good enough, and more over I -took- them. Had I had to get off the bike I might not have.
    #70
  11. munchmeister

    munchmeister Grow'd Up Mini Trail

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    #71
  12. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    https://www.amazon.com/Sony-HDR-AZ1...=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B06XYQHXZN
    I have this on my helmet with the remote next to my throttle (over the kill swich) it toggles easily between stills ,lapse,and video. Takes remarkably good photos ,but has a semi fish eye that needs editing to flatten out.
    And I have a Pentax KS2 weatherproof DSLR with 18-50 and 55-300 lense , plus a screw on doubler and 10x macro , misc hardware in a 15l marsee tank bag. easily accesable and can be set up and triggered via smart phone. A small but sturdy tripod straps across my seat with my tent and chair IMG_4280.jpg

    All in all the best set up I have had. I don’t miss much with the sony, and the pentax is capable of top quality photos on with little effort. The wi-fi link to the phone makes taking campsite tripod shots a great pastime. You can alter camera settings , trigger and view your shot from 50 feet away. Never leave your chair by the fire

    Edit, in this pict the sony remote is farther to the left of my throttle. I have since moved it over the kill swich so I don’t take my hand off the bar to shoot.
    #72
  13. KarmaSect

    KarmaSect The Dude Abides

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    Howdy. I would consider myself a very serious amateur photographer. My form of adventure riding is pretty hard core, so has influenced the choices and limits on the gear I bring along.

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    Most of my off-road rides are multiple day affairs utilizing little used two track or single track, in the mountains and deserts of OR, NV, ID, UT and CA. These rides can be very rough, wet and dusty.

    Rough!

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    Dusty!

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    Wet.

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    And remote:

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    It also is a great opportunity for wild life shots, where quick access and long lens make a big difference. Horses run.

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    Burros, Moose (and dead coyotes) don’t.

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    So, criteria for camera and gear selection:
    * Lightweight
    * Dust and water resistant
    * Focal length (wide to zoom)
    * Quick to focus & shoot
    * Easy to access.



    I currently have three camera/lens combina
    tions I use:
    * Nikon D600 FX with a 28-300 VR lens (3.75 lbs)
    * Nikon D90 DX with a 18-200 DX VR lens (2.8 lbs)
    * Lumix FZ-300 with an integral 25-600 Lieca 2.8 lens (1.5 lbs)

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    The Lumix is new. I will get to it in a minute.

    Traditionally, for these types of hardcore trips, I have taken the D90, for a couple of reasons. First, its very rough, dirty and risky travel. I’d much rather destroy an older D90 than my relatively new and expensive D600. Second, the D90 seems almost impervious to sensor dust, while the D600 attracts is like a magnet.

    Because of the harsh conditions,, I also limit myself to one single lens. That way I never have to break open the camera and expose it to nastiness directly. For hardcore trips and the D90, the lens of choice is the 18-200 DX VR — lots of range, but admittedly not the fastest or the sharpest.

    My current bike for the hardcore trips is a KTM 500exc with minimal camping in a Giant Loop Mojave, and photo gear in a Giant Loop or Wolfman tank bag.

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    And a recent picture at the Faultless Nuclear Test Site in central Nevada:

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    For street or gravel trips on my r1200GS, I take my FX body, but again only a single lens: a 28-300 VR.

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    Here is the setup I’ve traditionally used on the KTM 500 (the below pics are from my older Husky 610). Giant Loop tank bag with foam cut to fit the D90/18-200 combo. A small air bulb, cleaner and lens tissues are all stored in a slot under the foam. I have a similar setup in a Touratech bag for my D600 on my GS (again, only used when in tamer environs).

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    Given that we often encounter difficult technical climbs and downhills, even the D90 setup has been a problem. The Giant Loop tank bag is a little big for the 500 and limits physical movement forward. And its heavy having a 3.5 lb camera/lens mounted on top of a large 5.3 gallon gas tank (required given the remote locations).

    So…at the end of this season I took a bold and someone risky step (always worried about photo quality). I purchased a Panasonic Lumix FZ-300 as an alternative to my D90 setup. While a much smaller sensor, its roughly equivalent to the DX in terms of digital capture. And it has a Leica f/2.8 25-600 image stabilized lens. I’ve only been out on two rides with this new setup, but it looks promising. It is 1.3 lbs lighter, and much smaller, meaning I can easily fit it in my smaller Wolfman tank bag (thus further to the front of the tank). It is also weather sealed.

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    I considered other models (including the FZ-2000 with a bigger sensor) but decided on the 300 due to the price point of approx $500. Given the risk involved in these rides, I figured that was the dollar value I was willing to sacrifice! (Last year, I dropped the bike during a river crossing in the Nevada mountains around Jarbidge. Fortunately, the Giant Loop was zipped tight and no water got to my Nikon before I was able to lift the bike out from underwater!

    Besides camera and lens selection, in order to ‘get the shot’, access has to be fast. That means a modular helmet. My latest is the Scorpion:

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    With the Scorpion, you have the visor and shield of an Adventure helmet, the ability to fit goggles if necessary, AND the ability flip up the face quickly in order to start shooting.

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    Cheers.

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    #73
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  14. mikegc

    mikegc Long timer

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    IMHO, the little Lumix is perfect for your application. All the reports I read on it, CNET and DP Review, stated it was quite rugged. Sure, you sacrifice a little with the smaller sensor but look what you gain with that Leica lens. I like your riding/photo style.

    Mike
    #74
  15. oleve

    oleve Adventurer

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    a very interesting thread[​IMG]
    #75