Serious photographers: which gear to bring?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by longslowdistance, Mar 13, 2017.

  1. b4thenite

    b4thenite Been here awhile

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    Great shots do not require heavy equipment.
    #81
  2. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    So.. getting back to what to bring..Traveling with a DSLR, tripod, and a few lenses is pretty easy. Obviously.. Dust proof and weatherproof options make a lot of sense because well, you don’t want to have to water down the adventure just to get a few fair weather shots.( anyone can do that, as they have) If you want that , like someone said. Just bring the truck. But what about editing? and a place to upload and store your photos while you are tenting it in the great outdoors.? Laptop? Tablet? Bomber smart phone and a few spare sd cards?
    Spending the effort to get a good shot on a trip gives the photo a certain elevated value (to me at least) It is important to me to physically see it and sometimes see what I can do with it (bring up the exposere ,focus, reposition, etc) before I leave the area.
    Lately I have been using Image synk to tether (wifi) to a 7” tablet (it also works to my phone). Big enough to view the photo at size and small enough to carry . It works well for me at my given skillset. I can also use my phones hot spot to send off a jpeg or two at a prety good quality if the need arises.
    What are you using to store your picts? Is there a better software out there then Image synk for this usage?
    Or do you just wait till you get home and do it all there?
    G.
    #82
  3. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    I am my 'client'. I enjoy taking photos...and I enjoy riding to new places. To get a photo 'my client' wants....may require more than a smartphone. Always a fine balance between enough and too much.
    But....'my client' always comes home happy....and he is the only one that counts here!
    :clap
    #83
  4. b4thenite

    b4thenite Been here awhile

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    I don't know any professionals who compromises on his equipment because he wants to get to the job site on a motorcycle.
    Just because you carry big, expensive, elaborate gear, don't make you a professional.
    Let it be a photographer, plumber, hitman, whateva...

    I think it's a sad result of modern consumerism where we know the price of everything and value of nothing.
    When I hear a novice photographer insisting using a zoom for convenience and refuse to walk across the street to get CLOSER to the subject, I feel he is doing a great dis-service not understanding what "getting close" to the subject means.

    When carrying expensive, sensitive equipment, one has to protect it from all elements. Weather proof, shock proof, theft proof, etc. It bulks up quickly. And if you are so concerned about the quality of images, why carry BIG ZOOM lens? No zoom matches image quality of a simple prime. So you should carry set of prime on a separate weather proof, shock/vibration proof, theft proof case.
    Carrying a big camera in your tank bag is an idea, but I would never do it with my gear.
    OP was going to do a long trip. I'm sure anyone who embarked on a long journey knows there are so much stuff to carry. It is almost impossible to carry full photo gear ( whatever that might be ) along with rest of stuff for the journey, unless you are on a GS.

    My point is, why not enjoy the ride instead.
    And last, for someone to bring up my misfortune to make irrelevant point, I have one thing to say. YO MAMA.
    #84
  5. Plawa

    Plawa dןǝɥ puǝs

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    Which is not the point of this thread so why do you care what others do? Go enjoy the ride, save us the drama.
    #85
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  6. mikegc

    mikegc Long timer

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    I’ve offended and that wasn’t my intention. I wrongly thought that smiling emoji would inform you of the benign meaning of the comment. In deference to your sensitivity, I’ve removed the post.

    Mike
    #86
  7. hansen

    hansen airhead addict

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    That's why I eventually reduced my camera gear to a Nikon P7100 and a small tripod.

    To add another quote: Robert Capa said - If your pictures aren't good enough, you aren't close enough.
    #87
  8. mikegc

    mikegc Long timer

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    Robert Capa certainly got close enough! I met a man once who knew him and, like Mr. Capa, he, too, died SE Asia.

    Mike
    #88
  9. Robbo107672

    Robbo107672 n00b

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    If I'm in 4x4, I take the Mark IV, 24-70 MkII and a prime or two all in a small pelican case to protect from dust & water from outback Aus.. but there is some security in the 4x4 to hide it.. On the bike, I just take the Fuji X100-T which takes excellent landscape and people/landscape shots, just have to zoom with my feet a lot more.
    Rob
    #89
  10. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    May be true in many cases.....but wildlife generally won't agree!
    Or when there's a physical barrier such as raging river or deep chasm.
    Zooms have their place.
    #90
  11. FlatFifthFury

    FlatFifthFury Adventurer

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    Robert Capa's quote is usually misunderstood to mean that the photographer needs to be physically close to the subject but what he meant was to be emotionally connected to it as well. You can tell when a photographer, or any artist for that matter, doesn't feel deeply about their subject. This will come across regardless of the lens used, super wide or super telephoto.
    #91
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  12. KildareMan

    KildareMan Been here awhile

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    I'll stick to small and light so it's my EM-5 and 12-40 f2.8. Biggest issue is never having enough batteries and memory cards.
    #92
  13. FlatFifthFury

    FlatFifthFury Adventurer

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    When out on extended trips I use a usb powered battery charger for my Nikon bodies and all my bodies have dual card slots so that I can make in camera duplicates of my files to keep them safe. Memory cards are cheap so there isn't much of an issue with bringing a few extra. For the cameras that don't have dual card slots, like my POV cameras, bring along one of the many small external hard drive storage systems. The Western Digital is a good choice: https://www.wdc.com/products/portable-storage/my-passport-wireless-pro.html
    #93
  14. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    When on a long trip, I take lots of memory cards, SD variety. But not a computer, so is there any device out there that I can copy cards to, while keeping photos on the card, that doesn't require a computer/tablet or something??? I would just like to have my photos two different places because....well.... stuff happens!!!

    And if not...what are options? Doesn't seem like tablets have card slots...is that too 'old school'?
    Help!
    #94
  15. AdventurePoser

    AdventurePoser Long timer

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    Always a dilemma...I bring a Canon 60D and a fast 24 mm lens. The images are tack sharp and the rig is light and relatively unobstrusive. I also bring a Lumix LX 7.

    In the end, it's normally not what camera/lenses you bring, but rather what photographer do you bring?

    Good luck and safe riding.
    #95
  16. FlatFifthFury

    FlatFifthFury Adventurer

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    There are a lot of options if you don't have a camera with dual card slots. The one that I mentioned earlier, https://www.wdc.com/products/portable-storage/my-passport-wireless-pro.html is a good unit and there are a few more like it. That is self powered and has a built in SD card reader. Smallish and cheap.

    If you have a phone/tablet that you bring with you that will accept micro SD cards then get a really big one, like a 128gb and use that as your external backup. You can get a USB OTG cable and then just plug any card reader into your phone/tablet and copy your card to the internal card. Similarly you can get a card reader/hub that allows you to plug a thumb drive or external hard drive in to copy the files using your phone/tablet as the master controller. You need a solid state drive to do this as the phone can't power a spinning drive by it self, you will need a special cable that supplies power via a usb power bank or charger. This is my preferred method and I use an external SSD drive which keeps things very small and durable.
    #96
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  17. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    OK, I didn't understand it was self powered and able to stand alone with no computer/tablet connection. So I can just put an SD card in and it will automatically copy from card, and not delete card content? If that's the case, yes, an option.
    Thanks!
    #97
  18. lhendrik

    lhendrik Putins Puppet

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    Canon 7D. It travels in the tank bag, naked. if it looks like rain/dust/shitstorm, it goes into zip lock baggie. Easily within reach without dismounting. Eight years without any issues. Lovely pics, offloaded nightly to backup drive. 7D does attract too much attention while walking around as a tourist.
    #98
  19. Jorma

    Jorma Adventurer

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    Last year, my first with an interchangeable lens camera and time here was my kit, by the end of the year. I've got some other lenses which may swap in and out. I do not want or need any other equipment ever again and don't spend a moment thinking about it.

    a6000
    Sony Zeiss 55 1.8
    Sony Zeiss 24 1.8
    Sony 18 105 G
    Cannon 10-18 STM
    Nikon 200mm /f4
    monopod

    Small camera bag and 2 lens bags each with a roll top dry bag.
    assorted ditties for memory and cleaning

    Camera bag, 1 lens bag and monopod is in Stelvio side case. Other lens bag in big Ortlieb type drybag on seat.

    Like a monkey would, I occasionally get a good image with this stuff. As well it should. It's worth more than my car which isn't saying much. Worth it? Sure but it's stupid because I am not a photographer and nobody cares about my shots but me.

    This isn't one of them. It's part of the kit. baqs.JPG
    #99
  20. bicyclenut

    bicyclenut Adventurer

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    As a part-time pro I have 4 canon bodies, 2 Sony bodies and a varied selection of lenses - what do I take? None of them... instead just a Sony RX100III, some GoPro's, a DJI Spark drone and my phone. The reason I am going on a motorcycle ride is to ride and maybe capture some images on the trip. If I happen to get an award winning photo with what I have with me, then great, just a bonus. The best camera you have is the one you have with you and that is ready to use when you need it. I'm usually traveling with buddies and they don't want to wait around for the perfect light or while I fiddle with getting out my SLR, its much easier to just grab a small camera or a phone. Sony RX100 and similar have manual modes and can handle most situations that I need. I save the heavy gear for the dedicated photo trip. My first long trip I took a Sony A7II and 2 lenses and I never ended up using it, was just a waste of space and weight. Now my goal is to travel light and have a camera I can have in easy reach at stops or throw in my pocket that still has the resolution and features that allow you to be creative and get shots on par with a bigger camera. I also throw in a small table top tripod and a clamp on tripod/mount.

    Now if I were going solo to a location that I knew I might spent more time stopping for photos I would probably consider taking the Sony A7II and maybe a wide lens and a medium zoom, still trying to stay lighter and smaller that going with Canon 5Dx or Canon 1Dx body and lenses.