She slapped me with little provocation !

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by motoged, Mar 9, 2011.

  1. motoged

    motoged Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    908
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC
    SR,
    Bahia San Francisquito....One of my favourite places in all of Baja....in 2002 I spent 5 days there doing ABSOLUTELY nothing except eating smoked yellowtail, fish tacos, and sipping beer....never even walked farther than the ends of the beach/

    Some say it is run down these days....I say it is simply "rustic"...

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #41
  2. motoged

    motoged Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    908
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC
    So, after about 56 hours on the bus, we stepped out at Rice and Beans in San Ignacio:clap:clap:clap

    My first task was to get to the office and rent a room...once that was done, I lugged my bags to the room and collected my bike from its lair....in the midst of that, David approached me and introduced himself. David had heard of this ride through the Baja Nomads forum and asked if he could hook up with our ride.

    Through previous correspondence, I had explained to David that I was planning a different route for most of my 10 riding days and he had seemed agreeable to that. He would frequently respond to my occasional queries of "Where do you want to go today?" with the usual "I am on permanent vacation and am just following you around on your holiday!":D That seemed like a low-pressure response and I figured I could "trust his judgement" and go with his easy-going manner.

    Unloading from the bus, my first goal was to get the bike over to the room, settle for a moment or two, and then join the group in the restaurant for dinner. Once I unwound a bit, I joined the group for dinner as it was close to 8:00 pm by this time. Hooking up with David was the first time I had ever had such an encounter of riding with someone I had never met before and had no sense of what that experience was like.

    I tend to be a solo rider but am learning how to play well with others as my years pile up. I started riding street in 1976 at the age of 25; my riding experience soon included riding on gravel and dirt roads a fair amount as those were the roads that took me to the "Can we get there from here?" places that held interest for me. I didn't get my first dirt bike until 2000...

    Over the years I had come to accept that BMW GS's were NOT true adventure bikes, no matter how cool their ads were:deal. I treated them as such but have come to realize that the Bavarian Beast is just too heavy a pig for most of the places I want to ride... and I was getting tired of beating the 1100GS up in places that deserved a different bike....a better tool for the job.

    Don't get me wrong....I LOVE the GS as it has and will continue to serve me well for years to come...

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    But I digress......back to Baja:deal:evil

    Supper was good (Pescado con mojo de ajo) and the group spirit was
    one of excitement and anticipation. A few beers, a few margs, and lots of eager-to-ride folks.....off to bed by 10:00 or so.

    Up early and getting packed for departure Sunday, Feb 13th....:clap:wings:ricky

    The bus was empty... (Thanks for these pics, Dave:D):



    [​IMG]

    Packing was underway...

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    David ready to go...

    [​IMG]


    and his ride....

    [​IMG]


    I took a quick ride into town before the group start and took a few pics of one of the local race teams"

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    With their electric road racer....just dial it in....

    [​IMG]

    Back to R&B for the cluster start....and we were 9 guys headed southwest to the lagoon for our first leg of the trip....:clap:clap:clapto Mulege The Hard Way...over a route I have been wanting to do for the past 5 years....
    #42
  3. muddyrabbit

    muddyrabbit Lost Boy

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,993
    Location:
    Fugawee Land.
    MORE!:clap
    #43
  4. motoged

    motoged Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    908
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC
    Okay........:deal

    Day One: San Ignacio to Mulege The Hard Way

    Our gang rode out of Rice and Beans at the crack of 10 AM or thereabouts.
    Nine of us snaked through the village and south-westerly out on to the road to the lagoon. We rode a spirited ride on the pavement for the first 10 miles and then the riders spaced out a bit once on the rough gravel road that took over on the way out to the lagoon. The dust welcomed us to the ride and somewhat determined different riding styles. I, for one, REFUSE to ride in somebody's dust ...I just don't see the point unless racing or something :huh:huh.

    Some guys like to ride side-by-side in these conditions, some guys like to wait until the dust has only begun to settle, while guys like me like to wait until the dust has dissipated and to stay out of it until the next corner route-change rendezvous. After about a half hour of riding, we came to the junction where a road turned south towards El Paraje where David caught me rinsing some dust off my bike:

    [​IMG]

    David and I rode the sweep position for a while as the other guys were ripping it up ahead. Several of our group had done this day's route the year before and were on the pipe. At significant junctions, the "last rider" usually waited for the next one to appear and acknowledge him with a wave before continuing...the standard etiquette that is always promised at the beginning of most group rides :D...and is sometimes even implemented:lol3:lol3.

    Sometimes just a roost track indicated which direction the previous rider had taken :wink:.

    Somewhere between El Paraje, David and I stopped for a momentary break when he noticed he had lost a lower mounting bolt on his Touratech luggage rack (smartly complimented by Wolfman dry bags). He found a replacement and we continued south to Tres Palmas before heading easterly towards El Patrocino. The terrain so far was mixed alto plano desert and the road was fast, with little soft sand, but rough with exposed rocks and occasional washout gullies. Nothing really of a technical challenge, but the kind of stuff you sometimes want to be on the pegs for if you want your eyes to focus on the road. One thing about Baja riding: if you take your eyes off the road for a second, THAT is when you are most likely to hit a rock or a rut that hits your front wheel with a KRANG that wakes you up with a pucker clinch :eek1 :huh.

    As we rode out of El Patrocino we could see the mountains far off to the east. The road was still fast and offered some enjoyable riding.
    Every once and a while we would pass through an established rancho where often one or several people would be roadside pointing out the directions we wanted to take. We would usually stop and confirm our navigational wherewithall with the ranchers...they were friendly and helpful.:clap:clap

    The ranchos in Baja are a world unto themselves. They come from and continue to sustain a rich culture. These days they use hand-held radio communication and keep in frequent contact with one another. I assumed that they knew a group of riders were headed their way far in advance of the sound of our motors...

    A great insight to their life may be gained by finding and watching a great documentary called Corazon Vaquero

    http://www.corazonvaquero.com/cvj/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=20&Itemid=32


    The sparse desert flora began to become more dense as we approached the foothills ...

    [​IMG]

    And, coming down a hill into a rancho before Los Pilares, we came onto a cement-paved downhill section (an occurance with increasing frequency these days in parts of Baja mountain terrain)...

    [​IMG]


    David's hawk eye captured an old fixer-upper...

    [​IMG]




    I think it was somewhere past Los Pilares and El Datil where the road got rougher and was much more rocky riverbed than sandy double-track.

    We were headed up and over some challenging rough mountain roads towards Mission Guadalupe. Most of us managed to negotiate a hairpin in the route at the bottom of the mountain section by a rancho....Reid, Brian, and Lev missed that turn only to end up in a box canyon for a time-consuming detour back to that missed junction.

    The ride into that junction was spectacular as the road was totally a riverbed with rocks as a roadbed and frequent water-crossings and slimey green sections sandwiched between towering canyon walls on both sides.

    This is where the terrain started to tell us that the adventure had started. We followed the road peppered with switchbacks, loose rock, and some steep uphills...

    Rounding one switchback, my rear tire slipped out and I did the splits as my bike went down. It was picked up quickly but wouldn't start.

    Before I realized it wouldn't start, Wayne and Murray came up around the corner, saw me picking up the bike. Murray said, "No one saw it happen!" ....which I took as a joke meaning "No witness-no failure". He then asked if I was okay and I replied "Yes", as I had not been injured but had my first bike-drop of the trip :huh :cry.

    They motored on and I caught my breath while stabbing the e-button.

    ALL my pre-trip fears of fuel pump/fuel line kinks claimed centre-stage in my mind...:huh:huh:huh:huh:huh:huh (690 guys might know about this issue for some bikes....especially after removing the 690 fuel pump housing when installing filters or after-market auxiliary fuel tanks). After a dozen unsuccessful tries, I took my helmet off, turned off the helmet cam (unfortunately, I did not turn it on for the rest of the day....losing hours of killer riding footage :cry) and thought my trip was over for the day and I would have to do major fuel system surgery and sleep there overnight....(yeah, I know....my worrying can surface as worst-case scenario predictions...).

    I gathered my wits and turned the ignition key off as it remained on after the fall and engine stalling. When I turned the key on I heard the fuel pump prime....GOOD NEWS:evil I thought !!! With a bit of a prayer, I hit the button and the bike started....Boy, was I glad for that :clap:clap:clap. After about 20-30 minutes bouncing up the road, I came upon my gang at a pass, patiently waiting for me and the others (Reid, Brian, and Lev)...

    [​IMG]

    David caught Murray approaching the first pass ...

    [​IMG]

    Then Wayne...

    [​IMG]

    And finally me rocketing up the road...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    :rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl

    I was pooped at that point:huh

    The riding was not really that challenging for the other guys, but I am overweight and under-fit. Some might say that I am not in shape, but I sometimes need to remind them that "round is a shape".:lol3

    I got off my bike and waited with the rest for Reid, Brian, and Lev.
    We waited for about 20-30 minutes and entertained a variety of options.
    We eventually decided to continue forwards as we determined:
    1) Reid had a good GPS topo map and had done the ride the year before;
    2) Reid had a 5 gallon tank, so he could supply fuel to the smaller tanks if needed;
    3) The GPS topo map indicated that they had likely continued past the hairpin junction at the bottom of the mountain and that road would eventually reconnect to where we were headed within 10 miles or less...

    Views from the pass #1:

    From whence we came...

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Lounging around...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Examining a map...

    [​IMG]


    Wayne and I were the last to head down from the pass once we decided we could trust the Tres Amigos Perdidos to find their way to Mulege

    [​IMG]
    #44
  5. GoinPostal

    GoinPostal Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    387
    Location:
    Sonoma, CA
    Sweet ! :clap
    #45
  6. gsstampeder

    gsstampeder Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,121
    Location:
    Wandering
    Excellent!!! You guys are on one helluva ride. I was there last year and got totally lost in those mountain passes. Took us (myself and a coupla German fellas) two days to do this crossing. Those pics make me feel like I'm right there with you.....thank you:clap

    Keep 'er comin....
    #46
  7. Bora20

    Bora20 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    855
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC, CAD
    Subscribed...waiting for the the "surprise"
    #47
  8. dochstader

    dochstader Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    71
    Gedster:

    As usual, you are a great "Photo-journalist"! - no one captures the essence of the adventure like you do!

    Ell Mur.
    #48
  9. BajaDave

    BajaDave Crazy Bastard

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    Olympic Peninsula, Washington
    Regarding the bike not wanting to restart, you probably already figured this out, but the 690 EFI system has a tipover switch that shuts off the fuel pump after a laydown (safety feature). You have to cycle the ignition to reset it.

    More!
    #49
  10. 04klr

    04klr n00b

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2
    Mur, Mur, Mur 3:27AM!!! c'mon go to bed.
    great Stuff Ged!, thanks for putting this on-line, nice also to see a little green in a sea of orange!
    not to hi-jack by any means, but as a filler while we wait for more, a link to a little 12min clip of our ride, thx Ged.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUlTu7xMv_c
    #50
  11. KLRUSERIOUS?

    KLRUSERIOUS? Farkle-whore

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,336
    Location:
    Toronto Ontario Eh?!??
    That bus fekkin rocks! So does your thread....

    Glad smell-o-vision hasn't been invented yet.

    :lurk
    #51
  12. motoged

    motoged Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    908
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC
    Day One: (Cont'd):

    So there we were....a group of 9 riders split into two groups: the group of six convened at the top of the first pass and ready to push on to Mission Guadalupe and then Mulege; the second group of three left to their own resources with our trusting that they would make it to Mulege without tragedy....unless tragedy had already struck:huh.

    We rode on in several clusters with Wayne and myself pulling up the rear. Wayne is a strong rider and tends to prefer to ride sweep for several reasons: one is to ensure no one is left behind and is motivated by his caring for others; a second is his desire to ride his own ride and not be eating dust or pushed by the pace of others when he may choose a different pace; and the third being his interest in photography.

    The road varied from loose steep uphills to the usual rough roads meandering between dry river crossings distinguished by toaster-sized rocks as pavement :lol3.

    When waiting at the first pass, two vaqueros guided several cows and a calf past us from the direction we had just come...the cows were nervous about my bike in the middle of the road (the other guys had moved theirs to the side) and took a detour through all sorts of cactus and prickly bushes. The poor vaqueros had to follow to keep the livestock directed back onto the road rather than scattering down the mountainside.

    I felt bad about my laziness and leaving my bike in their path....and promise not to do that again:deal. It is ironic as I get bothered on group rides when the cluster stops to convene but does so spread all over the road rather than by pulling off to the side to allow any other traffic through....this time I was "THAT GUY".

    For another hour or more we would criss-cross paths with these vaqueros and it was stunning how they were always ahead of us with a herd increasing in size. I simply do not know how they did it :eek1:eek1:eek1:eek1:eek1, but this is their territory and they are the masters of it.:wink::wink::wink::wink:

    On the way up to the second pass my gas reserve light went on around the same time my 3-litre water pack dried up....which, unfortunately also coincided with me being dangerously close to bonking :huh. I was carrying too much stuff for this level of riding, should have been on my 450 for this kind of stuff, and ....as I mentioned earlier, I am a fat guy with no excuses (aside from the two previously mentioned :lol3).

    I told Wayne that I was getting low on fuel despite having put at least 8 litres of fuel in the Safari auxiliary tank....and he commiserated that he too was getting close to being on reserve....and we had probably at least 75 kms before we got to Mulege...cause for both of us to worry:huh:huh.

    I had opened the petcocks on the Safari tank at the top of the first pass as I wanted to shift some weight off the front of the bike... I thought that there is no way I used that much fuel even though the 690's fuel system was set to the high performance setting (i.e. thirstier mode):huh ! The Safari tank filler cap had a brand new stock KTM breather hose on it, the fuel lines were intact and there had not been any fuel leaks or spills that day.....so....WTF ???

    I unscrewed the fuel cap to see how much gas was sloshing around when I heard the hissing sound of escaping air....or something like that:D. Fuel started to flow when I removed the gas cap....the vent valve on the cap had not been working and no fuel had transferred to the stock tank....:huh.

    One less thing to worry about now....just my physical stamina was the weak link at this point....not bike issues....:lol3. I assured Wayne that I had plenty of fuel and could transfer some to him when he needed it as he was already coasting the downhill sections to conserve fuel.

    Wayne shared a bit of water and we wound our way down to the junction near the ruins of Mission Guadalupe. For me it was a hard slog but I was approaching an area where I have ridden a half-dozen times before....and that was somehow comforting.

    Wayne and I rendezvoused at the bottom of the mountain section and I told him to go ahead as I knew where I was but needed to stop for a rest...I could make it to Mulege on my own, I assured him.

    I sat for about 10 minutes before I heard some bikes coming along sort of from the direction I had just come. I looked through the brush and cactuses from the rock I was sitting on when I saw three bikes headed in the opposite direction I was going to take to Mulege. I thought, "Cool, there is another ride going on out here..." as I did not recognize their bikes.

    As their path seemed to cross behind me, one of them noticed my bike and pulled up.....it was our Tres Amigos Perdidos from several hours earlier:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap. Reid , Brian, and Lev figured their mistake out after coming to the end of a canyon and retraced their steps to the beginning of the base of the mountain section....

    They were in great spirits.... As the sun would be setting within an hour or so, we all recognized the need to saddle up and continue south and then east to Mulege...and it was about 1.5 hours to Mulege from this point:clap
    [​IMG]


    I told them to go ahead and I would be along shortly....

    I didn't see them for the next hour or more when it was dark and Reid was transferring fuel into Brian's Husaberg on the western outskirts of Mulege.

    My ride to Mulege was based on sheer grit and determination to get to the stable....the road from Guadalupe to the San Estanislao junction was way rougher than any other time I had been on it (the last time was two years earlier and only two months after the last of the two recent hurricanes had devastated the area....roads were now rockbeds in many places and roads through river crossings were now obstacle courses strewn with rocks ranging from babyheads to microwaves in size....with the ubiquitous loose deep sand punctuating the already torturous route:eek1:evil.

    I came up to Reid and Brian and made sure things were okay....and they cheerfully acknowledged that it was a simple fuel transfer stop. I felt bad when I roosted them with silt when riding away....quite unintentionally....but more due to my exhausted and marginally conscious state of mind. I had been doing one of my hardest ride days EVER...and was looking forward to some rehydration and rest.

    As I pulled up to the highway from the Ice House road in Mulege, Lev was stopped there....I pulled along side (on pavement here, so low roost factor)
    and asked him if he knew how to get to La Hacienda. When he shook his head "No|, I told him to follow me and we wound through Mulege and came into the back entrance of La Hacienda and through the narrow passageway into the courtyard to the cheerful hellos, back-patting, and Tecate-offerings from those who had arrived about 20-30 minutes earlier.

    So....despite the challenges of the day, a group getting "temporarily redirected", and my slow pace, the entire group arrived at the day's destination all within 30-45 minutes of one another.

    Not too bad, really...:deal:clap:clap:clap:clap:D:freaky:freaky:freaky

    The group was staying at La Hcienda that night while I was staying with David at a fellow's place he knew along the river (southside) in the Orchards section. The guys told me that I was to meet David at a small gringo watering hole called Jungla Jim's as he had arrived a good 1/2 hour before me and had gone to secure our loaner home. After starting my essential rehydration with a few Tecates, I was preparing to ride over to connect with David when he appeared at La Hacienda. Some quick dinner planning was arranged and the gang agreed to my recommendation to walk down the block to Las Casistas for dinner in about 45 minutes. David and I rode over to the river house and I unloaded, showered, and we returned to town for a great meal, fabulous margaritas (Las Casitas has THE BEST margs in all of my Baja research ....based on numerous Marg Tours up and down the Peninsula), and a great ride-review chatter amongst the group.

    It seemed that it was at this point that David and I began to make our connection and develop our budding friendship. We had shared a grueling day with many miles and rough spots in common, we were happy to finally be riding after so much trip anticipation, and we had 9 more days of riding ahead of us...:freaky:wink::clap:bmwrider:dutch:bmwrider:ricky:ricky:ricky:beer:ricky:beer
    #52
  13. motoged

    motoged Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    908
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC
    Dave,
    Yeah, I tested that feature of the 690 several times on this trip:lol3:lol3

    The Trail Tech Eclipse HID I bought from you led me safely for an hour in the dark and dust to Mulege on Day One....Thanks for that.

    David had the same unit but in a halogen bulb....I prefer my HID over the halogen having seen them side-by-side at night:clap:clap
    #53
  14. motoged

    motoged Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    908
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC
    Wayne,
    Thanks for adding your video of the trip to this thread...

    For the readers of this ride report: Wayne's video mostly represents the route the other seven guys took south out of Mulege to Los Cabos and back to San Ignacio....my ride report so far represents our trip up to the end of Day One...David and I separated for a different route after Day One.

    Some of the images in Wayne's video represents some of the more technical riding I wanted to avoid on the 690...while some of the images parallel stuff David and I rode....

    You get the idea:D
    #54
  15. motoged

    motoged Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    908
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC
    K,
    Well....you could sniff your finger and use your imagination...:lol3
    #55
  16. motoged

    motoged Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    908
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC
    Day Two: Around Mulege and Bahia Concepcion

    David and I met the guys at La Hacienda around breakfast time, yakked a bit, and went to Las Casistas for breakfast.

    The gang was getting ready to ride from Mulege west a bit and then south through the route to San Jose de Guajademi to San Isidro and continue through to San Jose Comondu and then to Loreto for the day's ride ...

    [​IMG]

    Randall (L.) and Ross sorting stuff out:

    [​IMG]

    Lev (L.) and Reid doing the same:

    [​IMG]

    David oversaw the entire event and, as he was new to us all, he sat back and bit his tongue while Ross captured the moment for his posterior....er, I mean "posterity" ...

    [​IMG]

    The gang made their way out of the courtyard, not to be seen for another 10 days or so....Wayne's video posted in a reply above catches the gist of their ride.

    David and I returned to the river house and we did a bit of bike maintenance:
    - air filters were clean;
    - no flats;
    - bolts tightened;
    - oil levels OK

    .....so we geared up for a cruise south out of town to visit friends and acquaintances along Bahia Concepcion... a mellow pavement ride along some of Baja's prettiest coastline.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Isla Requeson:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Our first stop at Bahia Coyote was short as "Pompano" was away somewhere locally from the beautiful home there that he had recently sold...his RV was his temporary home for the time being and rumour had it that he was going to the Pacific side of Panama for his next venture in exotic homesteading....and most excellent fishing:D.

    We rode further south to Buena Ventura to visit an acquaintance of David's who runs a shoreline restaurant.

    [​IMG]

    We had a beer and some agua before returning to Mulege where I wanted to drop in and visit with a fellow who seemed to be doing something pretty close to what I have been considering for some years ....running away to Baja with an Airstream in tow...

    [​IMG]

    Richard has been staying at Cuesta Real for at least the past several months, a lovely riverside motel/RV that I have stayed at previously...

    And he is equipped in a very classical way:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    While we visited for only a short while, it was great to meet Richard. Clearly a creative guy...

    More about his travels:
    http://360panoramas.com/


    [​IMG]

    David and I then returned to the riverhouse a few blocks away, puttered around a bit and then went looking for dinner. We first went to some new place south of town on the highway but it was packed with gringo RVers and a local Traditional dance presentation. As it was packed with folks and reservations, we had a beer and decided to go back to town and eat at Equipales, a great upstairs restaurant. A good meal was had and we returned to the house ...as we need to recoup from such a strenuous day:lol3:lol3.

    We decided that evening that Day #3 would be up to the tip of Punta Concepcion... the peninsula that creates and defines Bahia Concepcion.

    I had camped there in 1995 for 3 days on my first Baja moto-adventure and had returned to the southern part on other recent rides ('05 and '07)...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    David had also been there a few times and wanted to revisit a northern canyon leading to the Sea of Cortez.

    The plan sounded good to me :deal :D
    #56
  17. KLRUSERIOUS?

    KLRUSERIOUS? Farkle-whore

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,336
    Location:
    Toronto Ontario Eh?!??
    I'm just glad you didn't say my thumb!
    #57
  18. sarkmych

    sarkmych Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Oddometer:
    64
    Location:
    Alberta
    Awesome!!....just awesome!!:lurkOh, how I miss Mulege.....Las Casitas martgaritas that'll change your day, and the soothing sounds of.... Marvin....:lol3
    #58
  19. Crazylegs Bob

    Crazylegs Bob Tiger Tamer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    109
    Location:
    Dundalk, Ontario
    Thanks for showing the rest of us FF's how to REALLY LIVE!:wink:
    #59
  20. motoged

    motoged Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    908
    Location:
    Kamloops, BC
    Day Three: Exploring Bahia Concepcion Peninsula...

    The plan for the day was to explore the west side of the peninsula that defines Bahia Concepcion from the Sea of Cortez.

    The paved ride to the south end of the bahia was simple and scenic. There was some road reconstruction being done in several places as bridges were being built where some of the highway had been damaged in hurricanes over the past few years...and the construction looked competent.

    David and I dropped in again at Bahia Coyote to say hello to a Baja Nomad, "Pompano"....if we could find him. Fortunately he was there and we had a brief hello/chat. As we were geared to ride, we did not accept his kind offer of cerveza...but continued on.

    [​IMG]

    "Pompano" is a type of fish...

    [​IMG]


    that in no way resembles Roger...

    [​IMG]


    Well.....maybe a few things in common :D:evil....but I think he took on the tag as he is an avid fisherman.

    We rode on...

    The sand flats at the foot of the bay invited some speed trials, but gullies and washouts along the track soon brought us to our senses.

    After a few miles we headed north along a twisty double-track that was mostly sand and rocks, with occasional hardpack and beach...

    About a third of the way up the peninsula, David found a track leading to a place we were hoping to find. He brought me to a stop...

    [​IMG]

    at a turnoff that offered "excellent ubication" !!!

    [​IMG]


    We had a break and wondered out loud for a while...."What the hell is ubication?"

    As we were to learn a week later in Bahia Asuncion that "ubicacion" is Spanish for "the state or quality of being located or situated"....so, it seems it was a good spot we were headed to.
    #60