Shifting while standing

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by SCflyer, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. SCflyer

    SCflyer Long timer

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    Been ridin' for a few years, just getting into the dualsport stuff and with a 12GSA "easing into it" knowing it is less suited to certain terrain, esp. for a noob....so, how do shift while standing? I've watched the Dualsport riding techniques and plan on going for the BMW courses, but don't recall seeing anything on the vid. or read about it here. Is it something that comes more natural once you adjust the controls for standing :ricky and get some time off-road?

    Thanks all
    #1
  2. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

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    It's very easy to shift down. Can be a little trickier to shift up, but then as a noob/amateur you usually don't "have to" shift up right at that moment.
    #2
  3. Hayduke

    Hayduke ///SAFETY THIRD/// Super Moderator

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    I think it just takes practice. Get used to standing and riding and you'll be shifting without thinking about it.
    #3
  4. Crisis management

    Crisis management Latte riders FTW!

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    You should be able to ride the bike in almost any terrain while standing so if you're having trouble shifting it may be because you haven't set the controls up correctly for standing.
    You should have the arch of your feet on the pegs and the brake and gear levers set readily to the feet. Obviously as you need to shift both up and down the gear lever setting is a compromise, I have mine set in the middle position and tilt the foot either up or down to engage the lever.

    Check where your handlebars are set. Are they high enough to comfortably reach when standing? Do they need moving forward or back? Are the hand levers angled down enough to reach easily when standing?
    Set the bars and bar controls correctly and you will find standing easier and hopefully the shifting will feel more comfortable.
    A last thought; when I began standing I spent a lot of time in an empty parking lot practicing slow speed turns, accelerating, braking and stopping. I needed a bit of time to gain the confidence that the bike was controlable at low speed and in this different riding position, that may be worth practicing.

    Good luck!
    #4
  5. PacWestGS

    PacWestGS Life Is The Adventure!

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    Sometimes it just takes a bit more knee bend, other times I shift with the toe or heal of my boot and the foot is clear of the foot peg. It just depends. :D

    If you ride standing a lot or wear MX boots, then adjusting the shift lever up some helps quite a bit.

    There is only the techinque that works for you. :deal
    #5
  6. Hammer

    Hammer Hawlin' aZZ

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    I don't even have to think about it.
    But I don't use the clutch.
    It's in the throttle control, and floating the gears to match.
    #6
  7. Ben-M

    Ben-M Been here awhile

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    I consider myself an offroad noob; usually when I need to stand to ride over a section of road there is little if any gear changing. I do occasionally (rarely?) practice figure 8's and emergency stops in a bumpy gravel carpark though and will do a few gear changes there.

    And maybe it's just me but my eyes play tricks on me making it hard to see the 'f' in this thread title ...
    :hide
    #7
  8. Belgian Waffles

    Belgian Waffles Been here awhile

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    I used to ride trials, and still kinda do, so shifting while standing is really easy. Its just a bit more cramped on the KLR for the shifting foot than on the Scorpa 125...Just takes some getting used to. And +1 for adjusting your controls for upright riding - that is, if you are going to ride a lot standing up as it might compromise your comfort while sitting on the paved roads...

    Belgian Waffles
    #8
  9. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie GS Boxers forever.......

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    Consider switching to a shorter shift lever. Touratech and Wunderlich both make one that is either adjustable or fixed but shorter. I have one of each and like the wunderlich better. I don't reach the shifter tip if my arches are on the pegs and have to slide forward, (size 11 boots). With the shorter lever it's a lot easier. Both of thes have folding, spring loaded front ends that dont break or bend if you hit something. You can rotate them down in front a little on the splines and that also helps.
    #9
  10. SCflyer

    SCflyer Long timer

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    Great! thanks for the insight. At the moment most ridin' is paved with the odd dirt road I may come across while traveling. I"ve tried the body positioning mentioned in the DSRTs video and was a bit cramped. I guess I've just got to find the happy medium on control postitioning and practice, practice, practice.

    Thanks again - :D

    For Ben-M (ShiFting while standing) Better?
    #10
  11. Ben-M

    Ben-M Been here awhile

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    :lol3 What can I say, I'm just a bit twisted.
    #11
  12. TheDudeAbides

    TheDudeAbides Sarcasm free11/11/10

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    I don't use the cluthc while standing/trail riding. Just get used to shifting cluthcless and it makes it sooo much easier
    #12
  13. kYLEMtnCRUZr

    kYLEMtnCRUZr Got Singletrack?

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    Ride a trials bike, you have to learn to shift while standing!

    stand, place weight on right foot, shift with left, receive cookie lol.
    #13
  14. motorradfahrer

    motorradfahrer leichtmetallpferdereiter

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    Put some grip stuff on the sides of your tank where your knees go, and get used to clamping onto the tank with your thighs/knees. Once you've got that down it's much easier to adjust your foot while standing, because you can transfer weight to your knee, and then move your foot to shift up or down. I recommend Tech Spec Ice Grip if you want to kinda maintain the look of the bike, otherwise they make other ones that are more obvious, and Stomp Grip has been recommended as well.
    #14
  15. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    You also have to learn how to move your foot way off the peg to do so... Most trials bikes have the shifter far enough away from the peg to not be hit by accident in a section. In addition, most riders move the shifter up at about a 45-60° angle to avoid having it hit or come into contact with something while riding a section. A lot of riders will use their heel to upshift too.
    #15
  16. Charla

    Charla Tamalamian

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    :nod

    I still have to think about it. I usually wind up picking my whole foot up off the peg to catch the shifter with my toe.
    #16
  17. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    Other than some concious thought about it at the moment, you have it down pat. Moving your foot is reasonable. The last thing you want to do is have your foot bump the shifter to either another gear or neutral, so having the shifter away from your foot is reasonable. You just need to ride more shifting more to get it to be a natural motion without forethought.

    As for moving your foot on the pegs, in a side note: I have size 7 (men) feet and have to lift and even move my foot forward to shift while standing... pretty much always have over the past 35 years. Of course starting out on the trials bike, it became a natural thing since one would have had to have size 24 feet to shift while on the peg.

    Unless I cut the shifter down I have always had to position my foot with my heel partly on the peg to shift most any bike. I cut an inch out of both my old Bultaco flat tracker and Suzuki MX shift levers, to suit my feet. Bikes aren't built for people with small feet.
    #17
  18. Charla

    Charla Tamalamian

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    I wear a size 7 as well and my Tech6's don't allow for much ankle flex even if I could reach the lever. :lol3
    #18
  19. AnnieGS

    AnnieGS Namasté, bitches!

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    caveat: this may make it easier to unintentionally knock the bike out of gear. :baldy
    #19
  20. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

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    This shifting while standing business is something I need to work on. I end up taking my weight off the peg to move my foot under the shifter which affects my steering.
    #20