Should cell phone stay on the rider in case of a wreck?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by yeoman, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    Well isn't that a special contribution to a cell phone thread?

    Quite the contrarian you are, are you not? Bully for you. :clap

    Don't call us ... we'll call you. (or not) :lol3

    Back to the regularly scheduled topic.
    #41
  2. txwanderer

    txwanderer Been here awhile

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    It is called "cradar" if you are looking. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=actionxl.mandown&hl=en

    It works pretty well. i've played with it and it worked as stated. Make sure you mess with it and set the sensitivity, I think to medium. Make sure you tell your contact you are testing though, and not a couple minutes after the fact because you think you can beat the message. Don't ask. :becca LOL
    #42
  3. orangebear

    orangebear Long timer

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    Mine is in my jacket pocket so it's with me .Uk medics won't look at you phone just cut of your gear and get you to A&E to be fixed. It be police who run you reg number then fined were you live if you can't talk. Or just tape your emergency contract to the back of,your phone.
    #43
  4. mac10

    mac10 Adventurer

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    Good ideas here!

    I keep my phone in my inner jacket pocket,sealed at the top with Velcro to keep it there. it lives in a waterproof Lifeproof case. I keep the GPS feature on to aid in finding me. I always carry ID, and leave a note with my ride plan with my wife or somewhere findable at home. Around here emergency services will track down all 911 calls, even silent ones or hang ups. I programmed the phone to dial 911 if I hit the 9 key. They will come looking, and a phone with gps activated helps. Voice dialling could help too.

    I wear a hi vis jacket, and on the zipper tab is small waterproof strobe type light, which can be activated by pushing a button. And a fox 40 whistle- a ditch whistle- wired on a six inch loop. So I can get to it lying in the ditch. Something useful to do to attract attention. Cell coverage is spotty, but something like a Spot tracker could be next once I do my homework. Bike and gear all have bright reflective material,Solas grade.

    This way I am covered electronically,visually, acoustically and in the dark. Provided I am conscious,one hand functions, and I am not otherwise out of service.
    #44
  5. HAYVIATOR

    HAYVIATOR Don't be me dude.

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    I keep an expired ELT in my Pannier, if I come to an abrupt stop the Feds will come looking for me.
    #45
  6. bracky72

    bracky72 Long timer

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    It can't transmit through the metal of your pannier if that's what you have. If plastic then you are ok.
    #46
  7. Twoupfront

    Twoupfront Been here awhile

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    It won't do it through carbon fiber either (epoxy is a plastics), because the CF will act as a faraday cage just as well as the metal panniers.
    #47
  8. steelerider

    steelerider Southafricanamerican

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    After this last encounter with a suicidal kamikaze deer, I am definetley investing in a spot tracker. I mean, my cell phone worked, but if it had been broken it would have meant a long walk to help with a fractured collar bone, ribs, and scapula, plus I was disoriented from the crash. I hope I never have to use it. Plus I'm buying a damn Glock .40 cal and mounting it on my handlebars, so that if I see a deer I will willingly bust a cap in its ass before it has a chance to run out in front of me. Thoughts?
    #48
  9. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    You may want to work on an automatic tracking and firing system for the Glock, so you don't have to take the hands off the bars. :D

    FLIR might also be helpful.
    #49
  10. Falconx84

    Falconx84 Lurker

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    Not sure if you're serious or not, but in the event that it actually triggers it can take 2 hours before SAR teams have the information. If I recall correctly, it takes a pretty good jolt to make them go off. Not catastrophic, as most of my "finds" were just from hard landings. But in the event the bike slides down the pavement there may not be enough g load to set it off.


    Side note: the 2 hour response time is significantly better than the old style that was common when I was still active in SAR. The old units sent no identifying information and took around 6 hours before a satellite went overhead... And there were so many accidental triggers that they often waited for a second satellite to confirm it.

    Not the best source, but acceptable: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distress_radiobeacon
    #50
  11. steelerider

    steelerider Southafricanamerican

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    Hmmm....
    That, or figure out how to mount a frikkin laser beam. *points pinkie fingernail to corner of mouth*
    #51
  12. txwanderer

    txwanderer Been here awhile

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    Forward and aft facing .30 Cal Mini-gun. this should solve all sorts of problems. triggers on handlebars in reach of the grips.
    :gun2
    #52
  13. RTLover

    RTLover Long timer

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    I read a couple times that it's not good to put anything like a phone in the jacket pocket over your heart because it could concentrate the impact in a crash, or something like that. Seems logical so I carry my phone in a lower pocket. Just sayin'.
    #53
  14. farqhuar

    farqhuar Human guinea pig

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    ... and here's my luddite response.

    Rode across the Sahara in the mid '70s - no such thing as a Spot, EPIRB, cell or SAT phone, or GPS - on a 2 stroke road bike back before we had specialised offroad machines... and I'd do it again at a moments notice. Comms in those days meant 6 weeks to get a letter home and another 6 weeks for a reply.

    ... kinda puts put the whole question of "where the fuck do I carry my phone" into perspective doesn't it. :wink:
    #54
  15. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    The perspective is fine and all, but, if you rode across the Sahara and didn't have a flat would you leave the tubes and patches home next time?

    Granted, "be prepared" can lead to carrying too much stuff, and the "too much" can be a significant burden for a motorcycle traveler. The question is what criteria is used to determine where to draw the line between

    "better to have and not need,
    _____________________________________________________
    than to need and not have."

    Where most folks are riding these days the cell phone they already own and carry could be what makes the difference for them. It is small, light, and the usefulness far outweighs the burden. Cell service might not be so great in the Sahara, but it is available in many places more frequently visited by cyclists.

    This wouldn't necessarily apply to the most faithful of followers of brother Ned Ludd. :D
    #55
  16. Dan-M

    Dan-M Long timer

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    I always have it in a pocket. Better to have it on you with the slight possibility of it causing more harm than having it on the bike and not be able to get to it.
    #56
  17. Mike Garner

    Mike Garner Been here awhile

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    #57
  18. steelerider

    steelerider Southafricanamerican

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    Four years ago we lost a friend who went for a walk on a chilly spring evening. She was walking alone on a well marked, well known hiking trail by the Susquehanna river, in PA. She slipped down a small embankment, broke her hip, and was unable to get herself up and out for help. She passed away early in the morning from exposure. She was found 2 days later. Her cell phone was not in her person, but in her car. Very sad. Take your cell phone with you gents. Charge it before you leave, and keep it close by. For me, I was able to call for help while sitting on a rural road, all busted up from a deer strike. I can't honestly say how long it would have been before help arrived. The half hour waiting was painful enough. Not one vehicle passed me in that time. The GPS coordinates on the compass app helped me to guide the rescue squad in as well.

    Cheers.
    #58
  19. Y E T I

    Y E T I Unpossible

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    Interesting thoughts in here. My cell phone usually lives in a mount on my bars because I use it as a GPS. I may start carrying it on my person when I'm not commuting on major roads in case of an unwitnessed crash. :hmmmmm


    I definitely carry my SPOT on my person every time I ride off-road. That's a given.
    #59