Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. pioneertc

    pioneertc Blue Brother

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    7
    Location:
    Romania, adventure land
    Hello, some work on my Givi screen made from another Givi Honda Deauville windscreen, plus some old KTM handguards that fitted pretty well on non-original handlebar.

    Attached Files:

    MrKiwi and greybear like this.
  2. Reverand Hope

    Reverand Hope Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2016
    Oddometer:
    40
    The standard TA risers (on the 600 at least) have rubber bushings, as do the mirror mounts, so it's safe to assume Honda tried hard to keep vibrations down to a minimum . If you are retaining the original risers to mount your extension, there may be a lot of 'lash' or movement in the steering.
    People have used washers to stiffen the rubber bushings so this may not be an issue.
    The new extension should be able to accommodate standard or oversized bars (looks like you've indicated using shims in your draft)
    An additional GPS/phone mounting bracket would be very useful.
    A one-piece top clamp would strengthen the assembly, reduce vibration and provide a platform for brackets, ram mounts, a USB port etc.
    There's always a market for well designed, well made products, provided the cost isn't prohibitive
    Magus and rotorhead511 like this.
  3. Sentinel Frigo

    Sentinel Frigo Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    44
    amazing info :) thx for that , I ll add your points into this concept . any idea about best height of this bracket? is it 3cm , or 5 or 11? what would you wish?

    ds
  4. MyTicketToRide

    MyTicketToRide Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2013
    Oddometer:
    358
    Location:
    Wherever my motorcycle is
    Top end job. It's time...

    IMG_2150.JPG
    [​IMG]

    A few years ago when we considered doing this job, several of you guys warned us off of doing it because my oil consumption, albeit high, was still well within "spec." Thank you: that was great advice. I rode all through Central and South America on her like that, topping up oil here and there, and she was a champ.

    14089301_10103695825218484_4674679596401325271_n.jpg
    [​IMG]

    Now, I'm burning 1 quart of oil per 300 miles. After 94,000 miles and 18 countries together, she deserves a healthy dose of TLC and a bit of a top end job. A compression test we did 3 years ago made obvious that the rings were worn, but what else needs doing will only become apparent when we open her up this week.

    We've spoken to a few people who have recently done top-end rebuilds on the '89 Transalp, including a Honda Engineer. Thanks to these guys and our Honda and Haines manuals, we feel like we're well-armed with knowledge, but any additional recommendations, tips and tricks would be GREATLY appreciated.

    (And side note for those of you who were following our ride report: we apologize for being MIA... we promise to pick it back up, soon... more stories and photos to come!!)
    BoneDigger, ONandOFF, Magus and 2 others like this.
  5. Reverand Hope

    Reverand Hope Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2016
    Oddometer:
    40
    Good Question! I would imagine people who are considering raising their handlebars may be looking to fit over-sized or 'Fat Bars'. OS bars tend to come in lower profiles (less rise) without a brace. Renthal and Pro taper seem to be the bars of choice for upgraders. I doubt Transalp riders are going to be the most radical when it comes to profiles and bends; so nothing too straight, or wide, no huge sweep etc.....

    With this in mind, I'd say a fairly conservative rise of say 40mm would probably put most bars where most riders would want them, assuming they want to upgrade for an improved 'standing' position...
    It's very subjective...you can guarantee you'll do a production run at 40mm and someone will ask for 25....

    The good news is, with the type of 'revolving' riser you're planning, the options for height and reach are much greater
  6. Reverand Hope

    Reverand Hope Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2016
    Oddometer:
    40
    I have no tips or recommendations about the Transalp in particular, but having spent a long time fixing and fettling engines of one sort or another, be prepared to find things you weren't looking for....here in the UK, by the time you've paid for barrels, pistons, rings, wrist pins, bearings, cam chain, cam grind, head skim, valve re grind, gaskets and sundries, you could have bought two complete low mileage engines (one for spares!) and 'dropped and swapped' in a day...are you on a strict budget, or schedule? Are you paying someone to do the rebuild or fancy having a go yourself? This will obviously impact on the total cost in money and time....
    Of course, you've no way of knowing the true history of a secondhand engine but a proper leak down test and stator output reading would tell you a lot....consider also, your own experience with a high mileage engine that uses a fair bit of oil....they're pretty bullet proof as you know, so even a motor with a verifiable mileage of say 50,000 mls should be good to go...and may work out a lot cheaper than a proper top end rebuild using quality OEM parts.

    Whatever you decide, best of luck with your continued adventures
    MyTicketToRide likes this.
  7. R_Rick

    R_Rick Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    514
    Location:
    Halifax, NS
    I did the top end on my 87 two winters ago. It was burning a quart of oil every 300 to 400 miles. This was first time I attempted something like this and I faired quite well. Just take your time and you'll do fine.

    I did find that I had to source the parts from several different suppliers. Some items were still avail from Honda, others I had to get from overseas - got lucky on a few discontinued parts - and my exhaust valves had to be custom machined (very spendy! ). You should have better luck with finding the components for the 89 but you will need to go to the NOS sellers for the base gaskets as they are NLA from Honda.
    MyTicketToRide likes this.
  8. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,400
    Location:
    Arlington, Texas
    I'm 6 ft tall and had 2" Rox risers on my "89 TA with the stock set up and also with the XR650L front end. I'm using the oem bars with modded angles (I bent them horizontal) on the ends of the bars.

    OEM forks
    [​IMG]

    XR650L forks
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  9. Sentinel Frigo

    Sentinel Frigo Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    44

    thank you for your feedback, as it seems 4-6 cm will be the sweet spot. lets do it like this
    ;)

    apprciate your feedback
    MrKiwi likes this.
  10. Sentinel Frigo

    Sentinel Frigo Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    44
    thanks for your feedback , your point will be considered in our concept. WHo knows, maybe one day you will get one for FREE ;) ( maybe just for postal ;) )
    Dutch idiot likes this.
  11. MyTicketToRide

    MyTicketToRide Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2013
    Oddometer:
    358
    Location:
    Wherever my motorcycle is
    Thanks Reverand Hope. We know the rings are worn so we're hoping that the necessary repairs beyond that are minimal. Hoping to do everything ourselves (my partner has assisted on two top end jobs on Africa Twins), except for the boring of that winds up being necessary. We shall see... fingers crossed!

    Thanks for the encouragement, R_Rick. We have the Vesrah gasket kit and a few Honda OEM bits and pieces, but we're waiting to open her up to figure out what else we need to order. Fingers crossed.
  12. DudaRO

    DudaRO Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    153
    Location:
    Romania, Bucharest
    Did anyone tried to fit a CRF rear wheel (with hub) on the Transalp? I seem to remember somone did that awhile ago, was just curious how much work did it require as I want to get a supermoto setup and found a CRF wheel set for a fair price (the front mounts directly as I have a CRF front end on, with a CRF 21" front wheel). I expect having to machine axle spacers to center the wheel inside the swingarm and also take up the slack (22mm axle vs 25mm axle) and then having to center rear disc and sprocket but curious by what amount and if it requires simple spacers or complex, CNC adapters.
  13. plumer1kt

    plumer1kt Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    442
    Location:
    athens,greece
    that's what you are looking for http://advrider.com/index.php?threa...lp-modifications.39170/page-957#post-29193918
    but without a cushdrive on a supermoto?:hmmmmm
  14. DudaRO

    DudaRO Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    153
    Location:
    Romania, Bucharest
    While I would like to have a cush drive, that would mean getting another transalp hub and lacing a new rim with new spokes and that still leaves me without a front wheel, people sell these as a set so I would have to buy new, that would cost too much (it's not a true supermoto bike anyway). Most people run cush-less wheels on their racing sm thumpers, I would just use the bike in sm trim for street and maybe a track day once a year, so it seems more of a luxury. The set I found is talon hubs with excel rims for 350£ so it would be a fair price for this mod. The other option is adapting a set of Honda Hornet mag wheels as they use the same axle diam as my bike (20mm front and 22mm rear) but the rear takes a 180 wide tire and still needs a lot of machinig to align the sprocket and rear disc (the cush drive needs machined like 15-20mm and the rotor side around 3mm out of the hub). A set of Hornet wheels goes around for 100-150£ though.
  15. plumer1kt

    plumer1kt Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    442
    Location:
    athens,greece
    but the setup will be a supermoto one,tires brakes suspension....
    racing bikes also have half the weight,racing tires,racing fuel,racing suspension,serviced after each race and all the setup is based on performance and those riders don't care if any part don't last as long as we want for road use.
    every time you open or close the throttle it will be like a sledgehammer hit in your gearbox.at least use a cush-sprocket.
  16. Duanob

    Duanob Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2015
    Oddometer:
    83
    Location:
    Seattle
    Just in case here are Honda numbers for 0.25" over size piston and ring kits (still available!).

    Honda
    Piston 0.25"
    13102-MM9-305

    Rings 0.25"
    13012-MS6-305


    Valve Guides
    12231-MF5-305
    12241-MF5-315

    Valves Intake (2)
    14711-MV1-000


    valve Exhaust
    14721-MR1-000

    maybe a bit of machine shop work but you should be able to have a completely new top end for not too much money. Then the bike will be ready for the next adventure!
  17. jwb

    jwb Local minimum

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Oddometer:
    287
    Location:
    Oakland
    I did the top end of my '89, also burning about a quart per 300 miles, which is absurd. Diameter and circularity on my cylinders was perfect, so it was just new rings and new exhaust valve guides plus a valve seat cut. Was pretty cheap really.

    I'm trying to imagine what kind of monster you have to be to need the oversize piston kit??

    Anyway one thing I scratched my head about for quite a few minutes was that the new ring kits (from Honda) don't bear the letter codes that the manuals refer to. So if yours don't match, just ignore it.
    MyTicketToRide likes this.
  18. jwb

    jwb Local minimum

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Oddometer:
    287
    Location:
    Oakland
    P.S. those are .25mm oversize, not .25 inches! If you had .25" oversize pistons, you'd be riding a 700cc motor.
    MyTicketToRide likes this.
  19. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,684
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    Be certain to measure the cylinder bore at at least three different depths. Use a high quality tripod type micrometer.

    Many people will just buy the first oversized pistons thinking that this is the next step in the rebuild process.

    About 30% of the time we've seen cylinders that have worn into a "vase" shape with the bore worn larger in the middle or lower third of the cylinder. After compensating for this you may find that the first oversized is now too small.

    Measure accurately first and consult your machinist to find what bore size is necessary make the bores straight and even and then order the appropriate pistons and rings.
  20. Squily

    Squily Squily

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,502
    Location:
    Esperance WA (Down Under)
    JE pistons also do pistons in bigger configurations that suit AT, TA and Hawk. Nice high compression domed jobs. ;-)

    Edit: this is a 2mm oversize piston for the AT:


    IMG_0035Large.jpg

    P1080186Medium.jpg