Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. Bummer

    Bummer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    975
    Location:
    On The edge of Denmark
    Hi Guy´s

    I´ve said it before there is this guy in CZ, he does gear for the Transalp.

    Price 150 Euro.. + posting, seems fair.. nothing wrong with quality you can allways discuss stile..
  2. Bummer

    Bummer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    975
    Location:
    On The edge of Denmark
    Panniers..

    40 L. 236 EURO + posting...
  3. Bummer

    Bummer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    975
    Location:
    On The edge of Denmark
  4. Meli

    Meli EnTourist

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Oddometer:
    24
    Location:
    Czech Republic
    I have more of their accessories

    Attached Files:

  5. motomonte

    motomonte Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    40
    Location:
    PUERTO RICO
    I'm looking for a dual pipe transalp exhaust.Is there a place where I can see a full picture of it (off the bike) .I really like those pipes and I would like to graft them into an XR650L.
  6. Adh007

    Adh007 Needs to get back to work

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    771
    Location:
    Shreveport, Louisiana
    It's not really a dual pipe. It's just a single can with 2 exhaust tips. For an XRL, I'd think you could do lots better than a stock transalp exhaust, but it you want to go for it, I'm sure an exhaust shop would get it on there for you.
  7. newreartire

    newreartire Git Sum

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    60
    Location:
    Idaho Falls, ID
    You know, this thread REALLY REALLY sucks! Last year I had two transalps and now I'm down to none! Checking out all your cool scooters is making one sad lad. :cry :tbI jumped ship and am trying a VStrom. It warms my heart to see that there is still a bunch of 'Alp freaks out there. Even though I've cast myself out of the mix, I'll always feel like one of you guys. Rock on Brethren!:super
  8. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,120
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    Motomonte,

    The dual exhaust from the euro Dominator would probably be a close "bolt-up" for your L model.

    Both these pipes and the Transalp exhaust are real boat anchors. You'd probably do better finding a shop that could build you the system that you want.

    As least in California, I've found that the muffler shops that are frequented by the Mexican cruiser guys are generally good at building you something "custom" and are usually willing to work on a motorcycle. A Midas shop will just look at you funny. Building pipes for a bike with all the bends, twists and tight fits between the frame etc will take some time so be willing to pay the guys....oh....it's also good to remember that the pipes have to come off the bike with a wrench

    Ray Stedronsky
    Davis, CA
  9. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,120
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    A beautiful Saturday and a day of modding.

    My suspension linkage and shock arrived from Germany last week so today the AfricaAlp got the AT rear swingarm and suspension. Here's how it went.

    The swingarm is a straight "bolt-up" proposition so no problems here (see Jeff's posts about #880 for photos)

    Once the swingarm was on the AT shock and suspension linkage was added. The AT triangular link piece has different dimensions from the Transalp piece. I wanted to keep the rising-rate geometry the same as Honda designed it and I also think this will let me add a Wilbers later without the interference problems others have overcome.

    Here's the link piece:
    [​IMG]
    You can see that the dimensions are different from the Transalp piece:
    [​IMG]
    For anyone else attempting this, the upper link bolt (the one with the allen key) that mounts the link to the swingarm is important to get. The Transalp uses a normal nut and bolt arrangement here but the AT swingarm has the large hole for the round head of the special bolt to fit into. This bolt may be the same used on an XR600 or 650 or 400 (many Honda parts are interchangable) but I didn't want to have to hunt one down at the local salvage yard. Happily the rider I got the AT parts from included this bolt in the package.....whew!

    The AT shock has a remote reservior and a short hose that limits where you can mount it. My solution was to remove the Transalp coolant tank to make room for the reservoir:
    [​IMG]

    ....and remount a coolant tank in the space just in back of the airbox on the right hand side. This required removal of the airbox snorkel. The bike does not seem to run any different with the snorkel removed and since water would have to be about 3 feet high to get into the airbox now, it should not be a problem. The coolant tank is courtesy of Rubbermaid with help from the Dremel tool and some plastic fittings from the local friendly hardware store....looks a bit "Good Housekeeping" but works and you don't see it normally:
    [​IMG]

    With all this completed, it was time to mount the rear wheel. This required the most time. The Transalp left hand wheel spacer is about 4mm thinner than the Africa Twin spacer. Using the TA spacer made mounting the rear wheel easier because it all just fit with minor trimming on the brake backing plate (see Jeff's photos).

    The problem was that the chain-line was off, the chain rubbed the inside of the chainguard, the sprocket protector under the swingarm and the inside of the frame at the swingarm pivot. I measured the front/rear wheel alignment with stringlines and didn't find any great problem but the stringlines aren't incredibly accurate so maybe the 4mm didn't show.

    Anyway.....I decided to use the left side spacer that came with the Africa Twin parts. This solved the chainline problems but made the rear wheel (with spacer and brake installed) too wide for the swingarm. Using a bench mounted disc sander, I removed material from the outside of the brake backing plate where the axle comes through until the unit slipped into the swingarm. Here's a photo showing the additional space(between the red arrow) on the left side and a totally straight chainline (green) arrow. Unfortunately, my camera didn't show the CS sprocket very well. It's there and right in front of the rear sprocket....sweet!
    [​IMG]
    Now the fun began......the rear brake backing plate stay (the part the keeps the backing plate from spinning when the brake is applied) had to be carefully carved up so it would fit into the AT swingarm. Material was removed with a file until the unit fit well and didn't bind. Take this slowly. If you don't remove enough material the brake will make the wheel try to cock sideways in the swingarm and you'll have to push the wheel straight to get the wheel into alignment. I didn't want this so the majority of the afternoon was spend filing away until the wheel went into the arm and could move through the entire chain adjusting range with no binding or cocking. I got real good at installing the removing the rear wheel....musta done it 50 times....install, bind, find the tight place, mark, file, repeat....... Here's what is looks like:
    [​IMG]

    This made it all fit together. Like Jeff, I'd like to eventually find a AT rear wheel and disc brake set-up but that will have to come later.

    To complete this project, you'll need a new chain. I got a 130 link RK-Xring and trimmed off about 5 links.

    Here's a photo of the finished rear end:
    [​IMG]

    So now I've got an honest 8 (plus just a bit) inches of rear wheel travel in the rear. Next I'm going to fit a pair of XR250 forks up front. They are the same diameter as the Transalp forks so the triple clamps can stay. It will take a bit of modding to get the front brake to work. I think 9.5 inches in front and 8+ in the back will work well on the bike since (in all honesty) I'm doing about 90 percent road and 10 percent dirt....hell thats still 3 more inches of travel than my first MX bike had.

    ....oh yeah, at some point the welder will have to come out so the kickstand can be enlongated. Carrying the 4X4 piece in the tank bag might not be too bad of an idea. It'll give me something to throw at our cellphone talking,radio blasting,make-up applying,no-one-else-is-on-the-road-but-me, drivers we have round these parts....should make a satisfying CLUNK against the side window....and if the widow is open.....OH WELL !

    That's is for now,

    Ray Stedronsky
    Davis, CA
  10. motomonte

    motomonte Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    40
    Location:
    PUERTO RICO
    Thanks Adh007 and Ladd,regarding the pipes I think that I'll keep the stock anchor tough they still look cool.Sorry but I'm by no means a Mexican cruiser...
  11. Adh007

    Adh007 Needs to get back to work

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    771
    Location:
    Shreveport, Louisiana
    OK, OK, You guilted me into finally uploading a few of my pics.
    I put 500 commuting miles on this setup this week, no problems.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Serious suspension travel.. and serious ground clearance. I still need to get my kickstand extended, and I'm thinking I may need to consider a chain guide now, it's pretty loose at full droop... And that Africa twin rear suspension and disc brake is seriously calling my name. That think looks awesome Ray!
  12. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,120
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    I hope you didn't take that in a negative sense.

    I've had nothing but good experiences with these guys. One shop let me look through their scraps for a piece of pipe when I was putting the DRZ pipe on the Transalp...no charge.

    The other one fabricated a custom exhaust for a friends XR250. They built it on the bike and the only problem was he discovered he needed a torch to take it off. A quick return trip, some additional welding and a few clamps fixed that problem....it was funny though. None of us ever thought of it when the pipe was being built.

    Most of the "name" brand shops won't even let you cross the magic yellow "insurance" line in their places let alone have you help with suggestions and pipe building.

    Yay!! finaly photos of the long-legged Transalp.....Looks great! The chain is certainly slack at full droop. Hard to tell from the photos but it looks like the bike is higher in the rear then in the front. Have you measured your rear sag with you on the bike? You might be able to drop the rear down a bit and improve the chain issue. What kind of total travel figures did you end up with? Thanks for posting.

    Ray Stedronsky
    Davis, CA
  13. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,120
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    .....and it also looks like time to fabricate an inner fender extension to protect that expensive new Wilbers.

    FWIW I've found that old rubber mouse pads work well for this. They are about the right weight, can be cut with scissors and are practically free at computer stores since everyone is using the opitcal mice (interesting image) now.

    Ray Stedronsky
    Davis, CA
  14. davidmc

    davidmc Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    Oddometer:
    294
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA USA
    Ray, congratulations, that AfricaAlp looks amazing.....Wow! :clap
  15. O'Hooligan

    O'Hooligan Ken Dodd's dads dogs dead

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2003
    Oddometer:
    642
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Thought it was time to upgrade from my ratty old Corbin as it was making the bike look well worn. So I heard tha Rick Mayer Custom Saddles does a good job on stock seats so I went to his shop and had mine stock seat revamped reshaped and recovered. Excellent job, more comfortable than the Corbin, and a lot lighter. Must say the only problem I have is that the seat looks so good that now I have to keep the bike clean:evil

    Attached Files:

  16. PacificPT

    PacificPT Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2006
    Oddometer:
    984
    Location:
    Monterey, CA
    Did the Rick Mayer saddle use your existing seat pan? It looks great.
  17. O'Hooligan

    O'Hooligan Ken Dodd's dads dogs dead

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2003
    Oddometer:
    642
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Yes its on the stock seat pan, which is much lighter than the Corbin. I also had him revamp my stock DRZ pan and now its a much more bearable seat for rides to get to the dirt.
  18. FrenchOnionSoup

    FrenchOnionSoup Confirmed lunatic

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    64
    Location:
    Daytona Beach/Deltona
    I have a guy in my area (West Florida) that wants 4700 dollars for a 89 transalp that has never the dirt, is pristine, and only has 5000 miles on the clock. KBB gives me 2320, so I was going to go for 3000 max if the bike really is immaculate. I'm from France where these bike are common and good value (read cheap).
    My first pic is an Africa Twin (my Italian cousin raced Paris-Dakar 5 times on those) but I couldn't find them anywhere oin the USA and neither Canada.
    If you know how to get an Africa Twin, please drop a line.
  19. davidmc

    davidmc Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    Oddometer:
    294
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA USA
    The Africa Twin was never imported into the US or Canada, so your chances of finding one are near impossible. Every once in a while one comes up for sale that was imported to North America and these will sell for far more than the Transalp, which was imported into the US legally for 1989 and 1990.

    That pristine TA should sell for no less than $3500-4000, most likely even more. He would be crazy or extremely desparate to only take $3k. Keep in mind that KBB is typically only accurate for newer vehicles and is typically used for insurance companies to value a loss and dealers valuing a trade in. Values in the KBB and NADA are calculated using a standard depreciation formula. The KBB was develped for the their benefit, not for the consumer. For a 17 year old Transalp, the KBB will have no relation whatsoever to the current market value.

    To get an idea of what a Transalp is worth here in the US, check out the ads in the "Flea Market" after searching for "Transalp". In the US, Transalps are becoming more desirable every year and spring is nearly here, so I wouldn't expect prices to go down.

    Yes, the Transalp is worth much more in North America than in Europe.
  20. Road Wanderer

    Road Wanderer Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Oddometer:
    26
    Location:
    Tehachapi, CA
    What was the damage to your wallet for that seat??