Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. tgeliot

    tgeliot Topher

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    I'd say right here is best, but there is also http://www.transalp.org/
  2. KrankenWagen

    KrankenWagen n00b

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    Thanks, its own-made colorsscheme. :1drink


    Thanks!
    Rear wheel and caliper is original, swingarm from Africa Twin, linkage original, rear shock is zx1100 84m, fork is from Z1000J, calipers from zx1100 84m, front wheel from Tiger 800.
    All engine covers and caliper paint is GunKote. Rest is 2K.
    Thinks the twin engine suits this kind of style.... Also the plan is GPS speedometer with own style and logo, from http://www.speedhut.com/
  3. Aiks

    Aiks n00b

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    Cut to reduce wind on face:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  4. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Welcome to the Mod insanity.You definitely have vision, skills, energy, and ambitions beyond most of us inmates. Please keep us "posted" on your progress.:lurk
  5. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Here is a wear/stretch comparison of an oil pump chain with approximately 18k miles compared to a new one. I put a brass brazing rod next to the chain/sprockets to illustrate the difference. My impression is: the old one is stretched more than I expected, and the new one is pretty tight. So once again, If you need a new clutch you probably need a new oil pump drive chain also.

    [​IMG]

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  6. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Nicely done,

    Thanks for the photos
  7. Motology

    Motology Young and Restless

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    Hey everyone! First Post! Here's my TransAlp:evil:
    [​IMG][/IMG]

    Farkle List Upon Request
  8. dfc

    dfc Reluctant Cannonball

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    You obviously were the one that bought Mark's

    Welcome to the Asylum
  9. kyjenkin

    kyjenkin Squatchy

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    cornfield, Indiana
    Welcome to the site and one of the largest threads on it! Have fun with your beast!
  10. Motology

    Motology Young and Restless

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    Indeed I am. It's a great bike and he really kept it in good shape. I was really close to not getting it either. I'd seen his add on CL awhile back and wasn't sure if I wanted to dump my Ford Stock yet. Went to the Moon Motorsports Spring thing and saw it there with the for sale sign and it was all over. Dumped my Ford stock at $12.95 a share to buy the bike, and couldn't be happier. I love my TA and Ford crashed to the mid 11s:clap
  11. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    Before we jump to the conclusion oil pump chains need to replaced at low mileage..................:D...we need you to pull the clutch cover in let say 5000 in miles and measure the wear on the new chain.:evil:evil

    My guess we might find the new chain will wear or stretch to a certain point and remain close to the that point for more than 50,000 (as long a normal maintenance is performed (oil changes).

    PS A clutch at 18,000 is a very very rare wear item on a TA.
  12. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    I may never get 5Kmi on this one. It's kind of a hobby bike for me (see post#12772 pg 852). I won't live long enough to get 50k on it,( got other bikes) so, you'll have to talk to the next owner. I changed the clutch because it felt funny( had a little hitch in it when it was released), and the PO( learman60 said he thought it was slipping). After reading Ray's clutch changing procedure, I checked the pump chain and it was looser than I expected. Mark asked for the new and old comparison, so I posted the pics. For $62 it wasn't worth taking a chance. Glad I did it.:D --- Got a new ti muffler off some 600 sport bike, and built a new mid pipe,so had the exhaust off anyway to get it ceramic coated. Hobby bike!!!
  13. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    I have no problem with your improved comfort level.........just bring up there might not be the need to replace a rare part.

    I was kidding about the 5000 mile inspection.

    I don't beleive slipping is possible with the chain pictured. Pulling the chain away from the sprocket at the high full contact point is the correct way to check the true wear or slack.

    If this minor amount of slack was a concern this chain would have a chain tensioner from the factory....because they are all like the one pictured. This chain is used on over 25 bikes over a 30 year a period with no failures. The oil pump chain might be compared to the water pump that also has been replaced as a precaution with no data points. On a higher mileage bikes (+80,000-100,000) the cam chain and tension is the area that could benefit from inspection.
  14. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    I agree. Concidering the thing runs in oil all the time and has little resistance on it( except, maybe in the north where the oil is thick when it's cold), I was just surprised it had stretched that much. I've had thousands of engines apart and only seen one oil pump fail( although never worked on one chain driven) and that was from FOD. Even in extreme cases they're still running in oil. If you want my old chain, just pay the postage and I'll send it to ya. Save ya $62. And if anyone needs a drain plug sealing washer, I ordered one and they sent one package ( of 50 ).
  15. layzrider

    layzrider Layzrider

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    [​IMG][​IMG]
    I have wanted to modify a twin cylinder bike, especially a Transalp, for a long time. I got one that had been stolen, plastic wrecked, abandoned for five years, recovered and returned to the original owner. I was thinking it was going to be a shame to hack apart a good TA, so this bike was perfect for me. It is coming along fine and I am having a good time with this project. Looking on the web I am impressed with some of the work being done on bikes. Some of it, way beyond what I could or want to do.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    I don't ride very far, so I don't need all the adventure features on some bikes. The bike is intended for the street and Forest backroads. No dualsporting on trails. I have a Suzuki DRZ 400 for that. I am retired and like to ride at a casual pace, so the limited horsepower should not be a problem. I don't want to spend a great deal of money or time on this, so my changes are limited. Due to the bike being left out for so long, there are some rust problems, mainly in the gas tank, so I will do a coating job in it. Here are some photos of the project so far. More when I get it done.<o:p></o:p>
  16. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Welcome,

    We'll happily assist you spending your money on the TA..

    How about putting the air box where the tank is and building a tank under the seat, then building nice Dakar styled fairing around the whole thing with molds so you can sell copies to the rest of us.

    ....just as a start.

    Retired guys need projects.........also don't hide your other bikes.
  17. layzrider

    layzrider Layzrider

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    Doing anytime really advanced is not possible. I had a bunch of ideas before I got the bike but once I did, reallity steped in. I am struggling just to get the bike into running condition. I do have a target date of 3 weeks from now. There is a ride coming up. I am truly impressed by the work being done by others, way more than I can do. I bought some aluminum for side covers and radiator guards. Forming these could be a real challange.
  18. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Yep.

    Sally forth....we're right behind you.
  19. Douf

    Douf Limey Bitch

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    One week of ownership, it's getting stripped down and cleaned/serviced. After reading through the first 100 pages of this thread, the only 'must-do' alteration - from a reliability standpoint - appears to be the CDI box re-orient. Before reassembly, it's probably worth asking if there are any other Transalp doo-hickey's that need attention?

    [​IMG]

    First night home - meet the family.

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    Pampered.

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    Needs changing - right?

    [​IMG]

    Prep'd and ready for surgery

    Thanks,

    Douf
  20. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Hi Douf,

    Oh you're going to fit right in. Buy a bike....first thing...take it apart. :thumb

    Drives my wife nuts. I even do it with a (very rare for me) showroom new bike.

    What color is it? Hard to tell from your first photo.

    The CDI boxes ARE the "do-hickey" for the TA and at least you don't have to take half the engine apart to fix them. Changing the position can help but they seem to have about a 25000 mile life before they get cranky.

    Rule is...carry a spare. If you're on a long trip, carry two. Anytime the bike starts running on one cylinder or miss-firing look there first. Good thing is, they are easy to change and only as big as a pack of Camels (that's cigarettes not dromedaries for you younger guys).

    Careful with the tank mounting rubber doughnuts on the frame. They seem like then want to stay there but then disappear like magic when your standing there with the tank in your hands fitting it back onto the frame and are certain to be found in the most inaccessible part of your shop.

    The little brass "nut-certs" in the front fairing get real friendly with the screws and will spin inside the plastic when removing the screws. Since you've already fought this battle, you just have to be careful to secure them back inside the plasic fairing before reattaching the front. Go easy on the torque here and a dab of "anti-seize" on the screws helps a bunch later on.

    Take a very close look at the air tube going from the airbox to the carbs. The rear tube is attached to the main tube between the frame with a sealant that sometimes cracks due to age and heat and lets air bypass the system. Slathering more silicone on it seem to work pretty well. Also every PO is not too skilled at getting that rear tube to seal well onto the carb and you may find an air leak or gap at that point it they have removed this tube in the past. If you yank the tube and getting it back together is driving you nuts, repost here and we can talk you through the "procedure" for doing this easily. This post is getting too long already.

    Carb syncing is done with the tank off. The adjustment screw (#2 phillips) is found by looking through the hole in the middle of the air tube. You need a balancing manometer and an aux. fuel source. The screw is veeerrrry sensitive to changes so don't start randomly turning it a bunch.

    You've already got the larger front brake but a braided line will help a bit more. Watch the rear spring depending on your weight and the load you want to carry. If your rear sag (with you on the bike - loaded) gets to be more than 2.5 inches or so you may get a slow wobble above 70 or 75. The rear springs get tired after 20 years. From the photos, it looks like there is a lot of rear sag even with all the plastic taken off. Serious off-roading will lead you to a progression of suspension mods and a replacement rear shock is the only thing that will get the TA close to the handling of that big orange bike in your garage. The bars are rubber mounted in the top triple.....some guys like it, some find the response too vague and replace the rubber with aluminium cones (See Jim Rowley).

    Watch chain tension. Lots of people set this up way too tight. There's about 7 in of travel in the rear so tension has to be more like a dirt bike than a street bike. Too tight and the transmission output splines at the CS sprocket get hammered. Give this a quick look and a clean and dab of grease before final assembly.

    The rest is just details to give the bike a personalized fit