Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Hmmmmm............

    Ship the bike there...then ride back to the left coast afterward :hmmmmm:hmmmmm
  2. locorider

    locorider Loco, pero no estúpido!

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    do it!
  3. R_Rick

    R_Rick Been here awhile

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    Location:
    Halifax, NS
    After messing around for an hour here and there for past few weeks my TA is back to life.

    Few pages back I mentioned that I discovered an enrichment plunger/plug/cylinder (what ever it is called) that had the rubber boot separated from the plastic nut. the cable was full of crap that wasn't allowing it to open and close smoothly.

    [​IMG]

    I scrubbed, cleaned, and lube'd the cable so it now moves freely.

    I put carbs back in, hooked everything up, hit the starter, and ..... nothing! Engine was trying to turn over but wasn't catching. Pulled the front plugs and they were wet. Damn I thought - seems to be flooding. Pulled carbs back out, checked them over, measured float heights, etc. Everything looked fine so put back in, hooked up, hit starter, and .... nothing, except wet plugs again.

    Decided it couldn't be the carbs ... almost like I'm getting no spark. Pull the rear cyl plug, check for spark - nothing. Pull the front cyl plug ... nothing. Kill switch perhaps.

    Removed the switch assembly harness and check the switch, which was making proper contact. Check wire continuity and find nothing through one wire (the black with white stripe which loops to the cdi). Checked for continuity inside the switch and at the outside solder tab - still nothing. About half way down the wire harness was ~4 inch of electrical tape. I peeled the tape off and saw three wires that had heat shrink on them. Sometime in the past 25 years these wire were cut and "repaired".

    I cut the shrink off the kill switch wire and see the following:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Pics are a bit blurry, but there is not a drop of solder on the splice. If it was there it had long since deteriorated. the wires had a very loose single wrap to them and was barely making contact.

    Cut the shrink off the other two wires. Here is the best join of the three.

    [​IMG]

    Tracked down some 18ga wire in a few close colours, cut section out of wire, scrubbed off the oxidation, soldered a few inline splices, new heat shrink, new section of cable covering.

    Went out to shed this morning, plugged everything in, turn on key, barely move the choke cable (out about 1/8th), hit the start button .... instantly started and idled along. Gave a bit of throttle, rev'd up without issue. :clap:clap

    Needless to say I am very happy this morning. Unfortunately in middle of a storm right now so am going to wait to put everything back together and go for a test run.

    I've had the carbs in and out so many times in the past 3 weeks that I'm sure I can do it blindfolded now. I ordered a couple of #40 slow jets which ended up on back order. After getting carbs back in last weekend for the 10th time, I get a call on Tuesday that they were ready for pick up .... I think this will be a fall project now.

    Just wanted to say thanks to everyone who helped me along directly with ideas of things to check (as well as all those providing tidbits of info in the previous 890 pages).

    Cheers

    Rick
  4. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Nice bit of dectective work. Glad the bike is up and running.

    Maybe a good time for going over the wiring harness to look for other signs of "repair" from previous owner(s).

    Since your playing with electrons, it's also a good time to check the first 3-prong connection between the stator and rectifier. Keeping those contacts clean is a very good idea.

    The bike should run just fine with the 38 pilots....the 40 just add a bit of help at the low end for some bikes.
  5. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Thanks, That's just what I needed. Now, anyone have a RD03/RD04 triangle link they don't need ? Thanks again. PM please.
  6. gskelton

    gskelton n00b

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  7. ravelv

    ravelv from Baltic side of river

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    RD03 arm have same axle sealings like TA's swing. And as a bit longer that TA's stock swingarm.

    RD04 arm have small sealings inside swing's body besides bearing. Longer than RD03 arm.

    RD07 arm have additional ball bearing in chainside along with needle one. Will need little adaption to fit in TA's frame.

  8. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Then, the swing arm I have is from RD04. Should probably use RD04 triangle link and mounting bolts. I will try to find one. Thanks.
  9. wide

    wide Been here awhile

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    391
    Would like to see what you guys on here think.
    Did a day on some Welsh lanes, it was pretty rocky stuff. Obviously the speed is much lower than it would be on a smaller enduro bike like my DR, but the suspension height causes the need to go even slower than I expected. This in turn causes stability to be rubbish as sometimes speed is better to get over a rock.
    Wrong terrain for an Alp??? Or expecting too much from it?? Mate was on an old Tenere which faired much better
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Maybe time for a new Tenere
  10. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    My Opinion, a paved road and your photos of that Welsh trail are probably the two extreme ends of what you want your suspension to do.

    First one is smooth and most people don't like a lot of brake dive and softness up front when strafing apexes on the pavement.

    The trail is filled with repeated rather high, sharp edged bumps that makes it necessary for the suspension to be soft enough to both soak up the edge and react quickly enough to recover for the next one.

    With 20 year old suspension (likely standard stuff rather than modded or improved) you are just not going to get it to work well in both worlds. Modern cartridge forks and shocks with high and low speed circuits (not standard TA stuff) will be much better handling these two conditions.

    If most of your riding will be done like this, spending some money on suspension improvements will work wonders....or you could buy a more modern bike. That's even more dear.

    Beautiful ride though....wish I were there.

    It's about deciding what you want the machine to do best or what compromises you can live with.
  11. wide

    wide Been here awhile

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    Someone did suggest a Wilbers rear shock... not sure if they can come with a little longer travel and better springs up front. The last thing I would want to start is bodging on suspension from another bike
  12. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Those are the decisions that only you can make. My point was that improving suspension is much less expensive than buying a whole new bike. Particularly if the TA offers things or has traits that you really appreciate. Probably the best thing to do is to talk to local riders and find a shop the specializes in suspension work. Take the bike there and ask what they recommend.

    Wilbers here in the States can be ordered with different lengths and will build to suit your riding style for damping adjustments. They also offer springs for the front forks.

    A while back I was fortunate to work with Ricors here in Nevada to help develop their suspension mod for the TA forks. I'm not paid by them or anything but I do think that they offer the best solution for updating the TA forks to "emulate" the action of modern cartridge forks. Race Tech also has a very good product that does most of the same thing for the forks.

    The standard TA rear shock does almost nothing except keep the rear wheel from hitting the inside of the rear fender. If you're half-way serious about riding off-road, the only solution is to replace it with a quality unit....yes, it's expensive.

    That being said, the only way you are truly going to have modern suspension is to "bodge" it onto your bike. Everything else is just a "bodge" itself.

    So......if you want to make a large improvement you have to decide if it's worth the expense. It will be much less dear than buying a new bike. You have other bikes with better legs so you know how a well set-up bike can act. The TA is big and heavy and (IMHO) the rubber mounted bars go a long way to hurt it's off-road performance....it will never be as good as the little KTM in that stuff.....but then you wouldn't ride the KTM to Scotland.

    Also be aware that even new bikes don't have the best boingers as supplied by the factory. Great suspension is EXPENSIVE and it's an area where most manufacturers look to cut cost. Why else to you only see Ohlins on the Factory Special models.

    And even the most expensive suspension is junk if it's tuned incorrectly.
  13. wide

    wide Been here awhile

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    Sound advice ladder106 and something for me to pontificate over hey:clap
    All being said I am loving the Transalp, and maybe some minor tweaks will help it along
    Although I did look at a new Tenere660Z today in a bike shop, but finances wont allow:D
  14. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

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    Fitted heavier springs and Race Tech valves to my forks care of Dan and they make a noticeable improvement.

    The 660 Tenere has crappier suspension than my 25 year old oem Tranny.:eek1
  15. Backonthebike

    Backonthebike Giddy up

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    When I was putting my bike together for the first time I think I found a "bodge" solution to the rubber bushes; I put 1" washers above and below the rubber bushings, wound a heap of tension on the lower nuts and the front end feels virtually rigid....FWIW

    Cheers
    Tim
  16. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    Has anyone tried to graft a XR650L disc brake swingarm rear end assembly to TA?
  17. ric678

    ric678 Been here awhile

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    Location:
    WNY, where it no longer snows
    I'm willing to try is someone has a spare swingarm :D
  18. locorider

    locorider Loco, pero no estúpido!

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    I havent seen any comment on this thread about the NC700X. I tried searching but nada came up. Just want know the opinion of Transalpers. I'm looking forward to see and try one...just for fun...you never know...
  19. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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  20. MookieBlaylock

    MookieBlaylock Long timer

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    you know i bet it's a good bike but honda is dead to me until they actually make a competitive dualsport