Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. Hogberg

    Hogberg Adventurer

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    18
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    Sweden
    Thank's alot for your helpfulness.
    Ravelv: I have read your posts. Looks like I have to get my hands on a new bushing.

    Anders
  2. Hogberg

    Hogberg Adventurer

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    ...or just machine down the original TA bushing (which is 19 mm wide).
    The post from ravelv describing the RD03 bushing says it is 15,8 mm wide. :)

    Anders
  3. Belgian Waffles

    Belgian Waffles Been here awhile

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    Jan 25, 2008
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    875
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    Green. Wet. Oregon.
    Thanks Ray, I'll check my sag when I'm back home next week.
  4. dfc

    dfc Reluctant Cannonball

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    Jun 28, 2006
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    FunkyTown
    Its an '89. I built the bracket, not sure it would fit on a '99. I think I have a print somewhere for it, or could make one if anyone is interested.
  5. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    Mar 20, 2010
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    Pacific Northwest
    Question about the rear suspension upgrade/setup:
    I currently have a stock swing arm and shock (89 TA) and one goal I want to achieve is an increase in ride height and suspension travel. Assuming no change to the existing rear brake, wheel and swing arm, can you go with the following: XL600 or XL650 front forks (with progressive springs) and a new Wilber rear shock with the 30mm riser?

    I ask, not as I am trying to cut corners on my build, but trying to understand acceptable alternatives that achieve a similar setup. I understand that if you raise height, you decrease center to center geometry on the bike, which in turn can make the bike twitchier in corners, and I am OK with that issue.

    Thanks...
  6. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    As the swingarm angle becomes greater, the changes in the geometry of the rod operated brake also become more acute.

    Coming from your background with the Hayabusas, you may not use the rear brake much in your street riding but you'll find you do use is quite a bit off-road.

    The best solution would be to mod the brake rod pivot to be on the same center-line as the swingarm but this is not that easy to do on the TA. I thought about it for a bit but switched to the AT arm and rear disc soon afterward where it wasn't a problem.

    If I remember right, increasing the rear height makes it necessary to run more slack in the rear brake giving more pedal travel before engagement or strong braking.

    Carlos has kept his rear brake on his TA and might have more opinions or solutions than I can provide.
  7. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    ...good points for me to look at and they need to be added into the equation for upgrades. The issue of the rear brake is one I am cautiously aware of in that there is a translation from street to dirt and braking switches primary braking. I have been reading a number of posts wherein the utilitarian value between drum and disk has been debated and a few folks make an argument for keeping the drum over disk setup. I would base their differences are seated in their personal riding style.

    My style will only cover minimal single track riding as my intention is primary logging roads, dirt access routes and two up exploring (minimal need for excessive braking capability as highway speed is not a huge consideration).

    So in looking at alternatives, I may need to consider a structural modification to the stock swing arm (based on parts availability of a AT or RD03) and increase the length of the stock swing arm back to the OEM position if I go with the upgraded Wilber shock and raise the bike. This has not been an issue in the past with other swing arm mods I have done on bikes. Replacement would be the easier of the alternatives, and sourcing parts CONUS would be the most advantageous. I will interested in Carlos input and suggestions.

    Thank you.

  8. Iron_Floyd

    Iron_Floyd BIG ENDURO FREAK

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2011
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Serbia, Novi Sad
    Greetings from Serbia to all transalp dual-sport beasts worshipers :wave

    This is my first post to this forum. I've been watching this thread for a long time, and enjoyed in pictures of your moded machines. I'll post some of mine later, but right now, I'm facing with some very high pitch sound that is getting from the front cylinder of my brother's TA.

    I've recorded it, here is the link View My Video

    Just have to mention that the valves clearances ware checked, and everything is sett by specification. In and exhaust valves are set to 0.10 mm ( this transalp is 1987 )

    Can someone give me a help what this frustrating noise could be? Overall, the engine is working fine, no backfire, no overheat, no lack of power..
  9. wayne_l

    wayne_l Been here awhile

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    Aug 30, 2012
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    meadow lakes
    Is this the same one for sale on CL in the springs here ? very nice by the way i always thought it would be a great fire road bike with more suspension ..

    Sorry refering to the dakar black version ...
  10. Clockwatcher

    Clockwatcher Been here awhile

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    If the valves are set correctly...........and cylinder compression is good.....maybe an exhaust leak or a head gasket leak..........just a guess. Let us know what you find......
    Good luck on resolving your problem............:ear
  11. Clockwatcher

    Clockwatcher Been here awhile

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    I think you are on the right track............contact Rick at Cogent Dynamics.....he knows suspension, set mine up with xr600 forks with racetech valves and built me a long travel Moab shock for my TA...........makes a miraculous difference.
    I think his website is motocd.com...........:wink:
  12. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    Clockwatcher thank you! I have the front end covered thanks to a member on the site (just need to work out the final details) so your input is fantastic. I will contact him tomorrow and see if we can start a dialog on developing an option for what I am trying to accomplish. The fun thing and curse about building bikes is there are a million and one options you can use. I learned a long time ago, when you find something that works or meets your needs, go with it! Analyzing something to death can lead to vapor lock on a project and while I have some time to work on this, I want to spend more time riding than building. .
  13. ravelv

    ravelv from Baltic side of river

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    May 13, 2008
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    456
    Reading a bit old posts... RD03 swing with stock TA shock (also 375mm) gave me 45mm more height in rear. I think, with RD04 arm should be even a bit more as it is longer than RD03 swing.

  14. danyila

    danyila Adventurer

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  15. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    Pacific Northwest
    Spent the better part of Sunday afternoon reading this thread. I had hoped to be to the end by Thanksgiving...(Currently at post 4100). I am finding that this build of mine is taking on a life on of its own because of this thread and all of you.

    Most bikes I work on are newer in nature so there is not a lot of information on what you can/can't do to them. Yet with the TA, the Mod thread is like going through a history book seeing all the work that people have done. But it does not stop there, the human factor is incredible and the trials and tribulations and even the passing of some members draws you into a very extended and wide family history. So many times I am tempted to respond to a question or comment but I have to stop myself as they were asked and answered 7 years ago. So as I work my way to the present day section of the thread I find that I am beginning to weave myself into a very long linage of riders and builders who are really paving the way for the new owners like myself. I hope my efforts to copy the work they have done, does them justice. Thank you all for what you have done, I look forward to what will be down the road.

    Here is where we ended yesterday, the Givi bags are off and the few parts that are in are being laid out.

    [​IMG]
  16. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    I did the same thing when I got my TA. For thoes of us into this stuff, it's like a good book you can't put down. It was interesting to trace the migration of individual bikes from new owner to new owner and the changes they made. Also the coming and going of owners as their needs/wants change. Some members have greater knowledge/experience in one area and others in different areas, most are very helpful with answering questions even if they have been answered many times before. It's unfortunate that many of the the early pictures have been "dropped" , and there is no assurance that recent pictures will endure. I have a very disorganized set of notes/references, and save or print things I want to keep. Looking forward to watching yours and others continuing interpretations.
  17. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    Having gotten to know Dr. E through several emails I can tell you he's the right guy for such an undertaking. His mechanical experience and attitude will make this a fun project for all of us to enjoy and learn from.

    There is a wealth of knowledge in everyone here so feel free to ask any questions.
  18. Crash48

    Crash48 Secular Lord

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    Jun 21, 2011
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    I can't seem to find a vendor with any Givi engine guards in stock... Motorcycle Superstore showed on-line inventory available but none in reaity - and they are saying Givi won't give them a date on when they'll have any ready for shipping. I've just put a request in the flea market in case anyone has a set for sale or knows of someone who does.
  19. AppFan

    AppFan Been here awhile

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    Concord NC
    I'd be surprised if anyone really stocks them anymore. I ordered from sporttour under the same deal (they didn't know how long it would take Givi to get them made) and got them in two weeks. This was just a couple months ago.
  20. JBMorse

    JBMorse Been here awhile

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    Jan 2, 2009
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    NH
    I got mine here:
    http://www.happy-trail.com/Products/Engine-GuardbrHonda-Transalp__GIVTN363.aspx

    They mention a modification needed to mount this guard. You may already know but the only modification really is that you need a longer bolt for the front engine mount than the one they include. It seems like the length needed isn't easy to find in the right metric size so most folks, including me, use a 5/16" bolt in the correct length instead, which works just fine.