Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. Bossit

    Bossit n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    8
    Hi there,

    I'm rebuilding a Transalp 600. Already putted a nice WP USD front in but can't find anything to put in the back. As i want the bike higher then original. I also look for another rear mudguard. Can anyone help me out? Especialy with the rear shock absorber.
    @Blackbert: I see you've changed some stuff as well. Did you put another rear shock? And what kind of mudguard didi you use there?

    Thanks!

    Bossit. :-)
  2. Blackbert

    Blackbert Factory Rambler

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,061
    Location:
    Belgium, wrong side of the river
    Bossit,

    Front is a XR600 fork, with stiffer Wilbers-springs, the rear end is supported by a Wilbers shock, longer than stock to level the bike out. All inspired by the guys here.
    The rear mudguard, like the rad shrouds and headlight housing, is home-made from a 3mm sheet of Kydex.
  3. Daveski

    Daveski n00b

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Oddometer:
    6
    Location:
    Bonnie Scotland
    Bossit,

    I also fitted WP forks to mine - P.889. I was deciding on what to do to balance up the geometry as the WP fork legs from a 640 Adv were just over 50mm longer than the standard TA ones. There are 3 good options:

    - Spacer on standard TA shock - quite a few folk have done this on here using 30mm I think - you can find it looking back the ways
    - Wilbers rear shock is a good suggestion, as they are made to measure to you could get the 30mm (or whatever) built into a new shock over the standard length (375mm eye to eye on standard PD10)
    - Fit an Africa Twin complete rear end and shock from a RD03 or RD04 - both raise the back of the TA as they have longer swingarms and I think different leaverage ratios to the TA. I fitted the RD04 to mine as the swing arm is the longest and raises the rear 1.5 inches (ah, metric or imperial - I use both! about 38mm) from memory. The RD04 shock is also 375mm. Given the headangle - this seems to balance up the WP fork very well, and the bike rides great.

    I like the idea that fitting the AT rear gives more travel and increases rear ride height, rather than just increasing height by using a spacer. A longer wilbers shock should also give more travel to complement the front presuming the extra length is built into the stroke. I'm not sure if there are any issues with the chain tension by using longer rear shock or spacer on a standard TA swingarm - but I'm sure someone on here will know!

    Anyhow, you have options...

    Best of luck!

  4. csustewy

    csustewy Motojero

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    551
    Location:
    back in Denver
    +1 Distanzia's are great.

    I ran a Kenda 761 rear after the Distanzia's - very affordable and good life (~6500 miles of 2up touring), but not great in rain/wet. The Shinko 705 front was even worse (but some people are fine with it, I never found confidence in it). I would fork out for the Distanzia's.

    Also, Metzeler Sahara 3 front has great traction on and off road, tons of confidence, but very short life (~7500 miles to scary limit).
  5. Blackbert

    Blackbert Factory Rambler

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,061
    Location:
    Belgium, wrong side of the river
    I don't remember the numbers, but the maximum with stock TA swingarm and linkage is dictated by the space where the shock goes between the swingarm and the linkage (hope that makes any sense). At a certain angle, the swingarm 'bridge' touches the spring. You can't raise the rear more than that. My wilbers shock has the extra lenght in travel, not just as a 'spacer' at the bottom. The only thing you need to watch is the wear of the chainguide on top of the swingarm. If the chain is set correctly with stock suspension, it will have a little more slack when the bike sits higher. No problems there.
  6. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,142
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    FWIW, I didn't like the Sarhara 3 front.

    It followed every rut and crack in both pavement and dirt and didn't want to climb up out of ruts at all.
  7. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,987
    Location:
    Piedmont region NC

    That is what I did not like about the Metzler Tourance, on pavement is followed every road imperfection, I found it annoying and they did not ride as smooth or a quiet as the Distanzia's. The Avon's do pretty good off road unless it is wet.
  8. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6,419
    Location:
    Northside Brisbane, Qld Australia
    I found the same thing with the Sahara 3 front. The E07 front was a lot better on and off road.
  9. Bossit

    Bossit n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    8
    Hey guys,

    Thanks for the quick replies!
    @Blackbert: What did you pay for the Wilbers shock? Was that one made by your demands? Where do live in Belgium? Maybe it's interesting to meet? :-)
    @Daveski: The point is that i putted a AT RD03 swingarm already in my bike(PD06). And i've got a rear shock from an AT from a friend( i guess RD06 or RD07). The gas tube comes out in the front of the shock. This way i can't use it as it's in the way for the water reservoir from the cooling system. I guess what you're saying is that maybe your set up on the bike is different then mine. Or the rear shock from an AT RD03 is different then the one i've got.
    I'll have a look into it.
    Hope top hear from you guys again!

    Thanks a lot! :-)
  10. Daveski

    Daveski n00b

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Oddometer:
    6
    Location:
    Bonnie Scotland
    You are right, that tube is a pain - and needs lengthing. Another inmate pointed this out to me that a chap on here looked like he'd already done this (Santa?), and lengthened the tube alot. I think it probably also needs a right angle bend where it exits the shock body to completely stop it interfering with the coolant reservoir. I'm interested to see how you get on with a Wilbers shock if that's the way you go, as it looks like a great aftermarket option. Cheers.
  11. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,142
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    Just

    Move

    The

    Coolant

    Tank


    It's much easier than getting a longer high pressure hose for the rear shock. Plus....IMHO, the AT rear shock is no better than the standard TA unit...just fancier.

    Believe me, once you put a decent rear shock on this bike you'll wonder why you didn't do it much sooner.

    The coolant tank connection is only a bit of tubing. The tank can be any shape and located almost anywhere on the bike. You can find many different tanks, shapes and sizes from auto parts stores.
  12. locorider

    locorider Loco, pero no estúpido!

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,724
    Location:
    Puerto Rico, U.S.A.
    Agree 100%

    I'm keeping mine!



  13. Dudley

    Dudley Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Oddometer:
    880
    Location:
    Chaska, Minnesota, Palm Desert, California

    I run Avon Gripsters on my Transalp. Outstanding grip on dry and wet as well. I can drag the pegs and have scraped the aluminum bags. Decent offroad and superior mileage before changing them out. Its an older tire but they are suburb and priced right. Do not overlook them. With the low horsepower Transalps they don't get chewed up.

    Dudley
  14. showkey

    showkey Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,018
    Location:
    Wausau

    + 2 on the Gripsters :thumb:thumb
  15. Crash48

    Crash48 Secular Lord

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    92
    Location:
    44.6812° N, 63.5300° W
    Just bought this a couple of days ago.
    Chain, sprockets and steering head bearings are all it seems to need right now.
    Rear Kenda and front Trailwing should suffice.
    Appears to be an OEM rear shock but probably not the original as the bike with 83k kms runs very smooth over rough roads.
    Not sure what handle bars they are but ergos suit my 5'10" 185lb 31" inseam frame... stock screen works well with my full face but produces noise and buffeting with my 3/4 - suspect a spoiler may help.
    Wheels are a little pitted and spokes have lost their sheen but rust seems minimal so I hope they hold out.
    I won't be taking it off road... mostly got it for bumpy/pot holed pavement and gravel - so may not opt for the crash bars yet.
    Comments and / or suggestions greatly appreciated:ear
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  16. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,142
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    All our spokes look like that....well...probably not Marks.....no worries there I'd put a drop of oil on each nipple overnight and then just give the nipple a wiggle with a spoke wrench to make certain none of them are frozen.

    The bad spots on the wheel OUTSIDE aren't too bad. Most importantly...pull the tire and tube and look INSIDE. That bike has seen some salt air or a lot of moisture. Water gets between the tube and rim at the schrader valve and causes unseen corrosion at that point. I've seen a few rims that look "OK" from the outside but are badly eaten up on the inside....safety issue.

    Your chain and sprockets look like they should be replaced. Don't run the chain too tight. It should look more like a MX bike than a street bike. 1.75 to 2 in of play in the middle of the run is about right.
  17. Crash48

    Crash48 Secular Lord

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    92
    Location:
    44.6812° N, 63.5300° W
    Thanks for the reply and advice Ladder - chain and sprockets should arrive Wednesday.
  18. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6,419
    Location:
    Northside Brisbane, Qld Australia
    So, what is a good, light replacement front disc rotor to fit to a 1987 600.
    Didn't realise how heavy the oem disc is.
  19. R_Rick

    R_Rick Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    424
    Location:
    Halifax, NS
    Hey Crash,

    Nice to see another Bluenoser with an 87. If you're in need of shop manuals (honda and haynes) let me know and I'll drop a copy onto cd/flash drive for you.
    cheers,

    Rick
  20. Ruan

    Ruan Adventurer to be

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Oddometer:
    81
    Location:
    Portugal
    Bought mine like this in may 2012:

    [​IMG]

    Now it has crash bars and adventure lights:

    [​IMG]

    Adventure lights on:

    [​IMG]

    Gps and camera bracket:

    [​IMG]

    Side cases bracket (with friend's cases)

    [​IMG]