Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. potski

    potski Wiley Wanderer

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    Sep 24, 2007
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    565
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    In the mountains
  2. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    Mar 20, 2010
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    143
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    Pacific Northwest
    Good morning Potski,

    It is a padded seat cover that is riding on top of the Corbin seat. It is very comfortable to sit on and I may include it into the recovered seat when I get to the upholstery work of this project. If I can find a name on it I will post it up!

    Eric
  3. wdeTA

    wdeTA TransAlp Adv

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    Jan 13, 2006
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    477
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    Boulder, CO
    Looks suspiciously like the ATV seat from Walmart that gets touted quite often.
  4. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    1,978
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    Piedmont region NC
    That's what I was thinking, Stetson or Sterns brand I think then later re-labeled Walmart or maybe left plan with no brand?.

    I tried one once for one ride, that was enough, not enough natural padding on me I guess, I felt the channels.
  5. Belgian Waffles

    Belgian Waffles Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Oddometer:
    874
    Location:
    Green. Wet. Oregon.
    Been looking at upgrading the front suspension a bit. Comparing the progressive springs (~$100) to the intiminators (~$200). What do you guys think makes the most difference / is the best investment for trail riding considering the relatively cheap price of each. If the Ricors are that much better, maybe I'll just go straight to those instead of going with the springs only to want the ricors after all if they perform better.

    Thanks.

    BW
  6. Transalp1999

    Transalp1999 Adventurer

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    Nov 4, 2012
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    13
    Location:
    SVG, EWR
    Where did you pick up that light bar? What year is your TA? I have a 1999 and looking for something jut like that for some Ridge Industires LED lights!

    Thanks!
  7. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    BW, I have used the Progressive Suspension springs and they are a huge improvement over the original oem springs, they greatly reduced the front end dive.

    I have not used the Ricors but our resident suspension expert ( Ladder ) has and I think he is more than pleased with them, I think Ray is also running them with NX650 Forks.

    If most of your riding is on the road then I am not sure just how much benefit you would get out of the Ricors.
  8. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Davis, CA
    Good boingers are never inexpensive.
    I'd start by measuring your front sag with you and your "normal" riding items, full gear etc on the bike.

    The TA has about 7 in of travel in front as standard. If your sag is over 2 in. new springs are in order. Get a helper, hold the front brake, bounce up and down a bit then have someone hold the bike vertical while you put your feet up on the pegs. Forks can be measured by pulling one of the boots up and wrapping a zip tie around the leg. Push the tie all the way down on top of the seals after bouncing on the seat, then put the bike on a stand and measure the distance between the zip tie and the seal.

    If your sag is still OK, then just the Ricors will make a big difference. However, if springs are needed, the Ricors will still make a big improvement particularly off-road.

    Then, just when you think you've got it, you'll remember that you're running around on a 20+ year old shock.

    Even after making the forks the best you can (without a total fork change) installing a Wilbers or some other good shock will make (forgive me) shocking improvements to the whole bike.

    In the end, it really is worth it. I truly think that the reason some people go to a new bike is because their suspension is so tired or out of balance. Problem is, suspension is the first place builders cut corners so new bikes while having more modern legs still do not have quality stuff and the cycle repeats itself.
  9. Hogberg

    Hogberg Adventurer

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    Jun 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    13
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    Sweden
    Hello,
    I have been following the Transalp thread for a long time and step by step my Transalp -88 is transforming towards a more off road worthy tourer.

    In the front I have a set of XR650L forks and recently I got my hands on a RD03 swing and triangle.

    I am planning to keep the original drum brake rear wheel and spend my money on gasoline instead :wink:.
    So a question to you who have done this modification:
    • Have you only removed material from the drum brake side?
    • Will the chain line be straight with the original bushing on the chain side?

    Reason for asking, when I measure the swing arms the inner plane on which the bushing is resting on the TA it is about 1,5 mm closer to the wheel centre than on the AT swing arm.
    My thought then was to compensate this on the bushing. Perhaps I am only thinking too much...

    Thanks alot for all the inspiration in this thread :clap

    Best regards

    Anders
    Sweden
  10. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    I don't remember checking chain-line when I had the drum brake on my RD03 arm. I should have done this and likely would have if I had kept that drum on.

    I was able to switch to the disc quickly.

    I don't think you're over-thinking it. After you remove the material to get the drum backing plate to fit to the aluminium arm, I'd certainly take the time to get the chain-line correct. Use spacers as necessary to accomplish this but also keep in mind that you do not want to move the wheel center line too much away from the center of the bike.

    You may have to adjust chain-line by spacing just the rear sprocket a bit.

    Only trial and error will prove how this should go. Sorry not to provide more exact data.
  11. ravelv

    ravelv from Baltic side of river

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    May 13, 2008
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    444
    No, it will not. You have to use RD03 bushing. AT's bushings are different for each RD model.
    I don't remember lenght, I think, I posted that measurment along with my detailed description how to use RD03 arm in TA some few hundreds posts back...
    I actually shortened RD07 bushing on lathe when did conversation.

  12. Hogberg

    Hogberg Adventurer

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    Thank's alot for your helpfulness.
    Ravelv: I have read your posts. Looks like I have to get my hands on a new bushing.

    Anders
  13. Hogberg

    Hogberg Adventurer

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    ...or just machine down the original TA bushing (which is 19 mm wide).
    The post from ravelv describing the RD03 bushing says it is 15,8 mm wide. :)

    Anders
  14. Belgian Waffles

    Belgian Waffles Been here awhile

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    Jan 25, 2008
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    874
    Location:
    Green. Wet. Oregon.
    Thanks Ray, I'll check my sag when I'm back home next week.
  15. dfc

    dfc Reluctant Cannonball

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    Its an '89. I built the bracket, not sure it would fit on a '99. I think I have a print somewhere for it, or could make one if anyone is interested.
  16. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    143
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    Question about the rear suspension upgrade/setup:
    I currently have a stock swing arm and shock (89 TA) and one goal I want to achieve is an increase in ride height and suspension travel. Assuming no change to the existing rear brake, wheel and swing arm, can you go with the following: XL600 or XL650 front forks (with progressive springs) and a new Wilber rear shock with the 30mm riser?

    I ask, not as I am trying to cut corners on my build, but trying to understand acceptable alternatives that achieve a similar setup. I understand that if you raise height, you decrease center to center geometry on the bike, which in turn can make the bike twitchier in corners, and I am OK with that issue.

    Thanks...
  17. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    As the swingarm angle becomes greater, the changes in the geometry of the rod operated brake also become more acute.

    Coming from your background with the Hayabusas, you may not use the rear brake much in your street riding but you'll find you do use is quite a bit off-road.

    The best solution would be to mod the brake rod pivot to be on the same center-line as the swingarm but this is not that easy to do on the TA. I thought about it for a bit but switched to the AT arm and rear disc soon afterward where it wasn't a problem.

    If I remember right, increasing the rear height makes it necessary to run more slack in the rear brake giving more pedal travel before engagement or strong braking.

    Carlos has kept his rear brake on his TA and might have more opinions or solutions than I can provide.
  18. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

    Joined:
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    Pacific Northwest
    ...good points for me to look at and they need to be added into the equation for upgrades. The issue of the rear brake is one I am cautiously aware of in that there is a translation from street to dirt and braking switches primary braking. I have been reading a number of posts wherein the utilitarian value between drum and disk has been debated and a few folks make an argument for keeping the drum over disk setup. I would base their differences are seated in their personal riding style.

    My style will only cover minimal single track riding as my intention is primary logging roads, dirt access routes and two up exploring (minimal need for excessive braking capability as highway speed is not a huge consideration).

    So in looking at alternatives, I may need to consider a structural modification to the stock swing arm (based on parts availability of a AT or RD03) and increase the length of the stock swing arm back to the OEM position if I go with the upgraded Wilber shock and raise the bike. This has not been an issue in the past with other swing arm mods I have done on bikes. Replacement would be the easier of the alternatives, and sourcing parts CONUS would be the most advantageous. I will interested in Carlos input and suggestions.

    Thank you.

  19. Iron_Floyd

    Iron_Floyd BIG ENDURO FREAK

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2011
    Oddometer:
    22
    Location:
    Serbia, Novi Sad
    Greetings from Serbia to all transalp dual-sport beasts worshipers :wave

    This is my first post to this forum. I've been watching this thread for a long time, and enjoyed in pictures of your moded machines. I'll post some of mine later, but right now, I'm facing with some very high pitch sound that is getting from the front cylinder of my brother's TA.

    I've recorded it, here is the link View My Video

    Just have to mention that the valves clearances ware checked, and everything is sett by specification. In and exhaust valves are set to 0.10 mm ( this transalp is 1987 )

    Can someone give me a help what this frustrating noise could be? Overall, the engine is working fine, no backfire, no overheat, no lack of power..
  20. wayne_l

    wayne_l Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    185
    Location:
    meadow lakes
    Is this the same one for sale on CL in the springs here ? very nice by the way i always thought it would be a great fire road bike with more suspension ..

    Sorry refering to the dakar black version ...