Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. gigikoln3

    gigikoln3 n00b

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  2. gigikoln3

    gigikoln3 n00b

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  3. Rob 110

    Rob 110 Adventurer

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    UK, OK?
  4. gigikoln3

    gigikoln3 n00b

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    They don´t say in the package... Just say 12V Super bright led.

    I bought in a local store in Lisbon, for 20€ , and i have made the support´s by myself...
  5. Rob 110

    Rob 110 Adventurer

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    some progress:

    CR500 forks in with Transalp springs
    brake calipers rebuilt
    '82 CR250 shock in, with Transalp spring ground out a bit
    added 4.5" to stand
    [​IMG]

    GSXR pipe and DIY linkpipe and guard (bit cr@p)
    Husky 250 tail
    wide pegs
    [​IMG]

    seat butchered
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    recovered
    [​IMG]

    DIY forkbrace
    [​IMG]

    next:
    headlamp
    fairing
    bashplate
    front fender
    etc etc:D
  6. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    OK, got some more work done between the games today and a chance to grab some pics of a couple of items. Given that the bike is still in a bunch of pieces I will hit some high lights for now.

    Before the pictures a quick story, when I pulled the crash bars off, I was not planning on painting them or having to do anything to them. Well, as I was moving some parts, I kicked them and notice something chipped off???? Chipped of metal? Well, I dug a little deeper and found out the PO had used BONDO to fill in where he had not welded! Yes, bondo instead of welding on crash bars. After looking at this some more, I figured out that he tacked it in place and never did anything to finish it off except to farkle it instead of finishing the job right. So, 20 minutes of sanding four sections, quick weld job and they were as they should have been.. I tell you, when going through a previously owned bike, you have to check everything and not take anything at face value. Now to the pictures.

    This is the rebuilt 83' XR250 shock and spring installled

    [​IMG]


    Here is an overview which shows the swing arm. The dark area has been covered in heavy duty bed liner to prevent the chipping I had to clean up.

    [​IMG]

    This is the XR450 rear fender grafted onto the TA's previously shortened fender. I was really impressed with how easy it was able to bolt up. I did use a solid layer of adhesive which has bonded like concrete. Otherwise I was able to use the main tail light bracket to blend and hold the sections together.

    [​IMG]

    16T front sprocket:

    [​IMG]

    The Corbin seat with her new skin. The main seat section has a non slip material (including wet conditions):

    [​IMG]

    There has been some debate about tire fitment and whether or not a 150 will fit...nothing like jumping in and trying. It does fit and yes, it is a little crooked as I have not tightened anything down:

    [​IMG]

    Here is a side view with the inverted brake set up (that was so easy even a caveman can do it)!

    [​IMG]

    With the new suspension in and wheels on, she sits a good 5" higher then before...oh this is so nice now!

    [​IMG]
  7. gkam

    gkam Adventurer

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    Nice Transalps, Dr E and Rob 110!:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap

    But what is Ladder 106 engine mount upgrade?
  8. orso

    orso Adventurer

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    gallarate italia
    :D:D che marca di gomme hai montato ?????
  9. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Dr E, nice work, And +1 on not taking any previous work for granted. You must have a very understanding wife. :thumbup
  10. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Thanks for the photos, DrE.

    Body filler on the crashbars :huh That's a new one. Seems like it would be more trouble than just finishing the welds....How odd.

    Here's a few extra things I thought of as a reward for updating us "visual learners"

    ....You can extend the forward part of the rear fender (down at the swingarm) by using a flap to continue the fender down past the swingarm brace section. I used some heavy rubber from a computer mouse pad....you can get them cheap and in all kinds of colors or logos.

    ....There has been lots of discussion on the CS sprocket. Personally, I've decided to only use the official Honda part here. The 16T CS sprocket from the Honda Hawk will fit perfectly on the TA here. It is a bit more expensive than the JT product...but...as a bonus comes with a nice rubber "noise damper" bit molded to the outside that contacts the side links of the chain.

    But the real reason for using this is because we as a group have never scientifically determined the real reason for the sever output shaft spline wear that is seen on some TAs.

    My personal opinion is that this wear comes from running the chain tension set to "street bike" standards by inexperienced owners or even shop techs.

    But the real reason I use the Honda part is that I've not paid a lab to do "Rockwell" hardness testing on (a) the output shaft (b) the Honda CS sprocket and (c) the JT or other oftermarket sprockets that advertise that they are "hardened".

    So...while a "hardened" CS sprocket would sound - at face value - to be a good thing. It is decidedly NOT a good thing if the sprocket is harder than the output shaft. If it is....wear occurs on the shaft and not on the sprocket.

    Obviously it is much easier and less expensive to replace the CS sprocket than the output shaft.

    .......so......that's why the official HONDA part at this particular location. I happily use the JT stuff on my other bikes and at the rear wheel sprocket.

    One more tidbit, E. The CR shock reservoir MAY interfere with the standard TA coolant tank. If it does (it did when I used the AT shock and it does with my Ricor unit too) the coolant tank can be relocated almost anywhere. Small tanks can be found at auto wreckers in may different configurations. I'm still playing with the best one for the AT nose fairing. I figure that mounting it where the pilot can see it is a good idea.

    Right now my DR750 is more torn down than your TA...but I'm working on it . Well see who has a running machine first.

    .......Thanks for the photos....:clap
  11. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    Ray's (ladder106's) engine mounting upgrade is drilling out the existing front bolt holes and installing Grade 8 bolts. The factory Honda bolts are very soft and while this is not a problem of motors shearing them off, with engine guards they could run the risk of snapping if you happen to test gravity on the side of the bike.

    Estoy corriendo el Shinko 705 como un experimento. Hay mucha discusión neumático en la pizarra y varios amigos los están utilizando aquí y me gustaron mucho. Así que veremos cómo estas dos.

    This is my art studio/guest home next door to our main home. I have been building bikes in there for years and what makes it nice is its warm in the winter, cool in the summer and I can have the games playing on the TV and food/beer stock in the kitchen. Really works our as a win/win all the way around. When I am not working on bikes, that space is used for painting, pottery or anyone of the mediums I enjoy working in.

    Yeah, the bondo really got me on that one as well, but you never know what is running through someones head when they do something. As for the extention, I already have that one worked out and its sitting on the pool table with the rear fender. I saw you had done this earlier in the thread and liked it. No sense fighting mud and gunk in the shock if I don't need to. That was a nice mod you did so I am copying this and many things you have done.

    I need to go back and revisit this and see about ordering the OEM sprocket on this. I like the idea of the rubber dampener. Fortunately the spline on mine looks as good as the day it rolled out the factory as there no noticeable wear and the chain (while in bad shape) had enough slack to tell me someone did it right. Thanks for pointing out the differences between them, to much work into the bike to let something like this screw it up down the road.

    I saw what you were doing with yours and noticed the different coolant bottle. I have not worked out if I am going to used a alternate location and different bottle or what...but I did position my shock with the reservoir leading away from the bottle. We will see shortly what the final configuration I end up with and location.

    I am not going to race you on this as you know have a tad bit more disposable time on your hands for fun stuff then I do. I bet you could have two bikes done by the time I finally get this wrapped up...so I concede victory to you right now. :freaky
  12. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Wow, what a nice set up. Congrats. Would love to see some of your other work, maybe here http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=523072 :clap :freaky
  13. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    E,

    Not really a competition :evil

    Just a comment meant more to keep me motivated to foray out into a chilly garage and keep working.

    Painting and ceramics, huh....You renaissance men are a bit scary :0-0

    Just finished service on the steering head and suspension link bearings. Thankfully Suzuki uses caged needles rather than the loose ones on the TA. No chasing tiny bits of metal across the floor.

    Today the suspension gets reassembled and some electrical connections get cleaned up.


    You're making good progress so long as you're not distracted by a lump of wet clay.
  14. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    Cool beans...that's what I love about this site so much is the diversity of everyone and the cordial nature. I had not found that thread before...now I have to go pull some of my images for things into there.

    Hey, I am not a wet lump of clay...you been talking with Robin again!:D

    Oh yeah, those needle bearings. I did not use air to clean those out, but they are like herding cats when they come loose! I was grateful when that task was over.

    There has been a reason I have enjoyed building Suzuki's all these years, so many of their components are mated with other bikes and their subsystems and components are easy (in my mind) to work with.

    Enough lolly gagging on my part, got to go save the world for another day!:clap
  15. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Yup, here's another one I really like. Not good at it, but I like it. :D http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=529412
  16. Rob 110

    Rob 110 Adventurer

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    nice clean job Dr E 8)

    just a quick observation that Ladder raised about changing the coolant bottle to accommodate the shock reservoir:
    In the pic above, you have the remote going to the right side which saves changing the coolant bottle, thats what i did with my '83 CR250 shock :)

    BUT: you have the banjo on the shock at the back, this won't work because the airbox will foul it!
    I tried it this way but it won't go.
    Luckily the guy who serviced my shock put the banjo back on the other way, so it exits the shock front to the right and i mounted the reservoir on the rightside frame (Monster can in my pics)

    Hope this saves you a headache later DrE, or maybe you can use a heatgun to warm the airbox plastic and push it in to clear the banjo

    hth
  17. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Rob,

    Having the shock res. on the right solve some problems

    BUT

    How warm/hot does it get there?? It would seem that having the exhaust warming the shock oil is not the best thing to do.
  18. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    I will be keeping the reservoir above the exhaust so as to avoid heating issues. Also, Rob thank you for the input about right side placement and the air box issue. I already plan on modifying the air box to account for any spacing issues. As the bike draws into the final phase, fitment of pieces will be the final aspect.
  19. Rob 110

    Rob 110 Adventurer

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    fair point but theres a couple of inches clearance between my can/pipe and the reservoir, i'll see how it goes when i'm riding
    top of the shock is only a couple of inches from rear cylinder and exhaust manifold anyway

    hopefully the reservoir is filled with nitrogen too, not oil:D
  20. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Rob,

    Not suggesting you did anything wrong.....just one of those

    "Have you thought of this" kinda responses.

    Your observation about the entire shock being located near the hottest part of the engine is certainly valid.

    I've often thought about building a "lightweight" Transalp and will watch your build with interest.